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Archive for November 16th, 2008

Rapper Terrance “Bump J” Boykin Indicted For Bank Robbery

Rapper "Bump J"

Rapper

In the recording world, there’s more than one way to get attention. Bump J has found another way.

By Associated Press
CHICAGO – Chicago area rapper Bump J has been arrested in Southern Illinois on bank robbery charges.
The man, whose real name is Terrance Boykin, was arrested in Carbondale after a traffic stop this week.
Boykin is accused of robbing an Oak Park bank with another man last January, with the FBI saying they made off with $100,000.
Authorities around the nation were searching for Boykin after he was indicted by a grand jury in September.
If convicted, he faces a maximum prison sentence of 20 years.
For Full Story

Read Indictment

Sen. Stevens Harmed Himself in Trial by Testifying

Like every egocentric politician in this town, Sen. Ted Stevens may have given himself too much credit when testifying on his own behalf in a public corruption case.

Sen. Stevens During the Campaign/official photo

Sen. Stevens During the Campaign/official photo

By Del Quentin Wilber
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — The jurors had spent the better part of two days battling one of their own, Juror No. 9, who had refused to participate in deliberations. Several feared that they were headed for a hung jury, an ignominious end to the month-long corruption trial of Sen. Ted Stevens, one of the most powerful Republicans in Congress.
But when the jurors reconvened a few days later, it took them just hours to find Stevens guilty on all seven counts of lying on financial disclosure forms to hide more than $250,000 in gifts and renovations to his Girdwood, Alaska, house.
The jurors said they went from near-disaster to a quick verdict after they put their bickering aside and realized that prosecutors had presented an overwhelming case. Stevens, they said, did himself no favors by taking the stand, where he destroyed the grandfatherly image his lawyers had carefully crafted.
For Full Story