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Archive for December 13th, 2008

Justice Dept. Attache -Rome

EXPERIENCED ATTORNEY (GS-905-15)
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ATTACHE – ROME, ITALY
OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (OIA)
CRIMINAL DIVISION
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
WASHINGTON, DC

VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT NUMBER: 10-CRM-DET-004
Closing Date: February 4, 2010


About the Position: The United States Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Office of International Affairs (OIA) is seeking an experienced attorney to be detailed as OIA’s representative in Italy stationed at the United States Embassy in Rome. The Attorney will work as a member of OIA’s European team responsible for extradition and mutual legal assistance requests between the U.S. and Italy, and will serve as the principal representative of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice in Italy, working directly with U.S. and Italian law enforcement authorities on issues related to criminal investigations and prosecutions, as well as supporting the Department in the formulation and execution of bilateral and multilateral criminal justice programs and policies.

Responsibilities and Opportunity Offered: The responsibilities of this position include:

· Developing and facilitating the execution of U.S.-Italian requests for extradition and legal assistance in criminal investigations and prosecutions, and resolving problems regarding those requests;

· Working directly with Italian judges, prosecutors and the most senior Italian law enforcement authorities on criminal investigations and prosecutions, and serving generally as liaison with those offices and federal, state and local prosecutors and police agencies in the U.S. to ensure the law enforcement interests of the United States and the Department of Justice are understood and given adequate consideration by Italian authorities;

· Serving as legal advisor to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Federal Bureau of Investigation and Immigration and Customs Enforcement attaches and other U.S. law enforcement personnel stationed at the Embassy on operational and case-related issues, including the conduct of joint investigations with Italian authorities;

· Developing expertise in the criminal laws and procedures of Italy to assist U.S. authorities with questions on law enforcement matters, and assisting Italian authorities with questions regarding U.S. criminal laws and procedures, with the goal of achieving better coordination and cooperation through mutual understanding;

· Working closely with Embassy and senior Department of State (DOS) officials on international criminal maters, ranging from major organized crime and narcotics initiatives to terrorism and fraud cases, with a particular view towards clearly articulating the interests of the Department of Justice, and working toward effective integration of those interests with the policies and priorities of the Embassy and the Department of State;

· Representing the Department of Justice in multilateral fora on issues relating to law enforcement issues;

· Serving as liaison between and among the Office of International Affairs, senior representatives of the Italian Government, U.S. federal officials, and state and local agencies in connection with international criminal matters.

This appointment is for two years with the possibility of a one year extension and is expected to begin in the Summer of 2010.

Required Qualifications: Applicants must possess a J.D. degree, be duly licensed and authorized to practice as an attorney under the laws of a State, territory, or the District of Columbia, have at least five (5) years of post-J.D. legal experience, and be a current employee of the Department of Justice with significant experience in federal criminal prosecutions and international matters. Applicants should also have:

1. Significant experience in federal criminal cases involving international extradition and mutual legal assistance;
2. Significant experience dealing with complex legal and policy issues;
3. Working knowledge of federal and state judicial systems, prosecution, investigative and regulatory agencies;
4. Ability to establish and maintain harmonious relations with state and federal law enforcement agencies, representatives of foreign governments and the public;
5. Experience dealing with foreign governments and officials, and international organizations in law enforcement matters;
6. Understanding of, and ability to work within, US Missions abroad;
7. Familiarity with federal regulatory and investigatory agencies;
8. Ability to implement and effectively advocate Departmental policies on all matters relating to the assigned areas of responsibility;
9. Professional proficiency in the use of spoken and written Italian.

Travel: Routine travel as necessary.

Salary Information: The salary range is for a GS-15 position.

Location: Rome, Italy

Appropriate relocation and housing costs in Rome will be paid by the Department of Justice. If the individual selected is detailed from outside the Criminal Division, salary, benefits and travel costs will be reimbursed to the employing organization.

Submission Process and Deadlines: All interested attorneys should submit a resume to:

U.S. Department of Justice
Criminal Division, Office of International Affairs
1301 New York Ave., NW
John C. Keeney Building, Suite 900
Washington, DC 20530
Attn: Rome Attache Position

We encourage applications and resumes to be submitted by e-mail to Position, Rome on your DOJ Global Address Book, or Rome.Position@usdoj.gov Applications and Resumes may also be telefaxed to 202-514-0080. Submissions must be postmarked or received by February 4, 2010.

Internet Sites: This and other attorney vacancy announcements can be found at: http://www.justice.gov/oarm/attvacancies.html

For more information about the Criminal Division, visit the Criminal Division Web page at: http://www.justice.gov/criminal/

Department Policies: The U.S. Department of Justice is an Equal Opportunity/Reasonable Accommodation Employer. It is the policy of the Department to achieve a drug-free workplace, and the person selected will be required to pass a drug test to screen for illegal drug use. Employment is also contingent upon the satisfactory completion of a background investigation adjudicated by the Department of Justice.

The Department of Justice welcomes and encourages applications from persons with physical and mental disabilities and will reasonably accommodate the needs of those persons. The Department is firmly committed to satisfying its affirmative obligations under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, to ensure that persons with disabilities have every opportunity to be hired and advanced on the basis of merit within the Department of Justice. This agency provides reasonable accommodation to applicants with disabilities where appropriate. If you need a reasonable accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process, please notify the agency. Determinations on requests for accommodation will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Criminal Investigator (Special Agent)

Position Title: Criminal Investigator (Special Agent)

Who May be Considered:

Applications will be accepted from all qualified U.S. citizens that
SPEAK SPANISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. You need not be a current or
former Federal employee to apply.

Salary range shown does not include locality pay and Law Enforcement
Availability Pay (LEAP). An additional compensation rate of 25% will
be added to the locality salary.

Job Description:

In 2007, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
(ATF) was ranked as one of the top 15 places to work in the Federal
government and one of the top law enforcement agencies! ATF is
looking for energetic, innovative, solution- oriented professionals
to help the ATF team succeed in our responsibilities to reduce
violent crime and protect the public.

The profession of special agent is exciting and rewarding. Special
agents must be tough – both physically and mentally. They must also
be able to handle rigorous training, personal risks, irregular hours,
and extensive travel. Special agents are subject to reassignment to
any ATF office in the United States, to include any U.S. Territory or
ATF overseas assignment.

Selected applicants shall be appointed in the excepted service and
must satisfactorily complete a 3-year training program which includes
but is not limited to successful completion of the special agent
basic training program, new professional training and qualify and
maintaining firearms proficiency.

Key Requirements:

  • Must be able to speak Spanish and pass Speaking Proficiency Test.
  • Take and pass TEA exam and Special Agent Applicant Assessment Test.
  • Be in compliance with current drug policy and pass drug test.
  • Take and pass polygraph examination and medical examination.
  • Must obtain a top secret clearance.
  • Application must be received online.

Feds Nab Big Fish in Violent Colombian Cartel

Authorities nabbed a major fish in the drug war. The question is: Will it have any impact on cocaine traffic in the U.S.?

By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI — The reputed kingpin of a violent Colombian cartel blamed for smuggling cocaine worth $10 billion to the U.S. was flown aboard an FBI plane to Miami on Friday to face a 12-count federal indictment.
Diego “Don Diego” Montoya, described as the notorious head of the North Valley Cartel, could spend at least 20 years in prison if convicted on charges of drug trafficking, money laundering, obstruction of justice and witness retaliation by murder.
Montoya, who did not yet have a U.S. lawyer following his extradition, was being held without bail awaiting an initial court appearance Monday.
Under Montoya’s leadership, the North Valley Cartel in the mid-1990s become Colombia’s dominant cocaine smuggling organization, taking over from the Cali cartel whose leaders also were prosecuted in Miami. At its height, North Valley controlled about 60 percent of Colombia’s cocaine trade, authorities said.
For Full Story

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Experts Say Wiretap Conversations Spell Big Big Trouble For Gov. Blagojevich

Even though he knew he was under investigation by one of the most tenacious U.S. Attorneys in the country, Gov. Rod Blagojevich just kept talking on the phone. That cavalier yapping could prove toxic in trial.

By Kevin Johnson
USA TODAY

If Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich has a chance at combating the conspiracy charges against him, legal analysts say, he must never let a jury hear his own words captured on federal government wiretaps.
The governor was arrested Tuesday on charges that included conspiring to sell the U.S. Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama.
Notre Dame law professor Jimmy Gurule, a former Justice Department official, describes the tapes as the “breathtaking” centerpiece of the government’s prosecution. “Unless the governor is successful in keeping the conversations out of a future trial, it’s hard to imagine what the defense is,” Gurule says.
Attorney Roscoe Howard, former chief federal prosecutor in Washington, says the recordings represent “the corpus of the crime” that will be difficult to attack if they are admitted as evidence in a courtroom.
“The governor is in deep trouble,” Howard says.
For Full Story

Paper Reports that Businessmen Wanted to Raise $1 million For Ill. Gov to Help Jesse Jackson Jr. Get Senate Seat (AP)

VIDEO OF STATE ATTY Gen. Seeking to Have Governor Removed