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Archive for March 17th, 2009

CIA Officer Accused of Rape Claimed to be an FBI Agent At One Point

cia

This guy sounded like big big trouble. Who knows what he got away with when he was overseas.

By Jeff Stein
Spy Talk
WASHINGTON — Andrew Warren, the former CIA officer accused of date rape in Algiers late last year, caused such a ruckus over parking dispute at a Washington, D.C. hotel three years earlier that the matter was referred to the FBI.

Multiple sources said Warren flashed official credentials and claimed to be an FBI agent during the dispute, which took place in late 2004 or early 2005 when he was escorting Egyptian intelligence officials on an official visit to the CIA.

Warren was a senior CIA operative in Egypt at the time, said the sources, which include two senior former spy agency experts on the region, who demanded anonymity in exchange for discussing the matter.

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OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-Justice Dept. Lawyer DeMaurice Smith to Head NFL Players Assoc.

DeMaurice Smith

DeMaurice Smith

It looks like the NFL players are in good hands if Smith’s credentials are any indication. With an economy in the dumps and issues like steroids always surfacing, Smith should have his hands full.

By Mark Maske
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — Washington lawyer DeMaurice F. Smith was voted the executive director of the NFL Players Association last night, the union announced.

Smith was elected on the first ballot by a majority vote of the players who serve as union representatives for the 32 teams, sources familiar with the voting results said. The vote took place at the union’s annual meetings in Maui, Hawaii.

Smith is a D.C.-based partner at the firm Patton Boggs with no significant previous NFL ties. He succeeds the late Gene Upshaw.

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A Snapshot of Justice Dept. Nominee Dawn Johnsen: Office of Legal Counsel

Dawn Johnsen

Dawn Johnsen

By AllGov
Dawn E. Johnsen is an outspoken critic of the Bush administration’s use of the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC)-a key part of the Department of Justice that she once led on an interim basis during the Clinton presidency and has been asked to lead again.

During her previous tenure at OLC, she advocated for increased executive power. In 2006, she joined with several other Clinton Justice Department officials in support of retaining the right of the president to use “signing statements” that allow him to bypass laws, claiming that the practice should be retained even if President Bush abused it.

Johnsen does not support the prosecution of CIA operatives and contract employees who committed torture. She does support investigating how it came to pass that the “OLC misinterpreted the law in a way that led to torture.”

Born August 14, 1961, and raised on Long Island, Johnsen graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Yale College in 1983, with a BA in economics and political science. She was accepted into Yale Law School, where she served as the article and book review editor of the Yale Law Journal. She received her JD in 1986, and proceeded to clerk for Judge Richard D. Cudahy on the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago. It was here that Johnsen met her future husband, fellow clerk John Hamilton.
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Appellate Judge Blasts Federal Prosecutor in Salad Dressing Conviction

henries31In this harsh criticism of a federal prosecutor, an appellate judge took the unusual step of specifically mentioning the prosecutor by name. Federal prosecutors should probably take note of the ruling to avoid similar situations in the future.

By Ameet Sachdev
Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO — U.S. Appeals Judge Richard Posner is known for his provocative opinions, but his harsh criticism of a Chicago federal prosecutor surprises even close court observers.

In a March 12 opinion overturning a 2007 conviction of a suburban businessman who had relabeled bottles of salad dressing, Posner blasted Assistant U.S. Atty. Juliet Sorensen for improper statements. Posner said the appellate panel tossed out the guilty verdict because of insufficient evidence, but he added that even if there had been enough proof, he would have ordered a new trial because of the “prosecutor’s misconduct.”

It’s not unusual for judges to be critical of prosecutorial tactics. But Posner’s rebuke is drawing attention because he identified the prosecutor by name and called for sanctions.

“The government’s appellate lawyer told us that the prosecutor’s superior would give her a talking-to,” Posner wrote in the opinion that was joined by two other judges on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. “We are not impressed by the suggestion.”

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