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Archive for September 23rd, 2010

Feds Sell Off $67.8 Million in Madoff’s Belongings So Far

Bernie Madoff/facebook photo

Bernie Madoff/facebook photo

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

While 72-year-old swindler Bernie Madoff serves a 150-year sentence behind bars, federal authorities are working to use his ill-gotten gains to repay his many victims.

On Wednesday, in the latest court filing in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said the government so far has recouped about $67.8 million through the sale of his belongings, though the figure obviously falls far short of the $50 billion or so Madoff swindled from investors.

The government tally so far, according to court documents, includes $7.3 million from the sale of his New York City co-op; about $59 million from the sale of his four-bedroom, 1.2-acre home in Montauk, N.Y.; $1.4 million for his Cap d’Antibes apartment in the French Riviera; and cars, boats, a securities account and personal property.

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Conn. Man Charged With Sending 50-plus Anthrax Hoax and Bomb Threat Letters

connect 2
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Federal authorities in Connecticut have charged Roland Prejean with allegedly sending more than 50 anthrax hoax and bomber threat letters to judges, government officials and citizens around the country.

“This defendant is alleged to have sent more than 50 letters nationwide, in which he threatened to kill numerous victims, by shooting them, bombing the buildings in which they work or exposing them to a substance that he claimed was, but was not, anthrax,” U.S. Attorney David Fein said in a statement.

“The letters victimized both private citizens and public servants, and resulted in the evacuation of a post office, a town hall and a public school. Such threats cause significant diversions of law enforcement resources, inflict fear in the victims, and result in substantial disruption of public and government services, and they will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”

Prejean turned himself into law enforcement authorities in North Dakota on Sept. 7, authorities said.

Pakistani Scientist Gets 86 Years for Trying to Kill U.S. Agents and Soldiers in Afghanistan

afghanistan mapBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

By all accounts, this was not your typical sentencing.

First, U.S. District Judge Richard M. Berman in New York sentenced a U.S.-trained Pakistani scientist to 86 years for trying to kill U.S. federal agents and troops.

That came  after defendant Aafia Siddiqui, 38, called on Muslims to resist using violence, the Associated Press reported. She also said she loved American soldiers.

Then afterward,  Siddiqui,  told her supporters, according to AP: “Don’t get angry. Forgive Judge Berman.”

The judge then responded, according to AP, by saying: “I wish more defendants would feel the way that you do.”

AP reported that in February she was convicted of trying to shoot U.S. authorities in Afghanistan while yelling, “Death to Americans!”

USA Today Reports Says Some Fed Prosecutors Involved in Misconduct

Dick Thornburgh/doj photo

Dick Thornburgh/doj photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — A USA Today investigation has concluded that a number of federal prosecutors across the country have “put innocent people in prison, set guilty people free and cost taxpayers millions of dollars in legal fees and sanctions.”

The paper said it had documented 201 criminal cases since 1997 in which “judges determined that Justice Department prosecutors — the nation’s most elite and powerful law enforcement officials — themselves violated laws or ethics rules.”

“In case after case during that time, judges blasted prosecutors for ‘flagrant’ or ‘outrageous’ misconduct,” the paper reported. “They caught some prosecutors hiding evidence, found others lying to judges and juries, and said others had broken plea bargains.”

Former Attorney General Dick Thornburgh told USA Today that the worst consequence of misconduct is a wrongful conviction.

“No civilized society should countenance such conduct or systems that failed to prevent it,” he said.

To read more on the report click here.