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Archive for August 8th, 2011

FBI Will Once Again Give Test on Domestic Operations

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
The FBI soon plans to give its employees a test on bureau policies for conducting surveillance on Americans. The test, if you recall, is called the Domestic Investigations and Operations Guide. (DIOG)

Last time the test was given for the DIOG, things didn’t go so well. In fact, a scandal developed. The Justice Department’s Inspector General last year found that a number of employees cheated on the open-book test on the DIOG. Some agents passed around the answers. Some finished in such short time it was obvious they cheated. Some folks got in trouble.

This time agents, analysts and other employees are going to take a test focusing just the revisions made on the DIOG. It will be much shorter.

Paul Bresson, spokesman for the FBI, said he expects the test to be introduced in the coming weeks.

“Prior to implementation of the revised Domestic Investigations and Operations Guide (DIOG), all FBI special agents and appropriate professional staff will be required to successfully complete a training course and assessment,” Bresson said in a statement to the ticklethewire.com

“This requirement, to include the assessment, is designed to review important concepts (including items focusing on respect for civil rights and privacy concerns) and to ensure that FBI employees understand the changes that are being made in the revised DIOG.”

“Much like other web-based training regularly provided by the FBI, the DIOG assessment will be part of the educational program.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI Agents Say Hijacker D.B. Cooper Probably Died During His Jump

fbi photos

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The mystery man known as D.B. Cooper, who parachuted from a plane in 1971 with $200,000 in ransom money, probably died during his jump, according to FBI agents on the case, Ronald Kessler of Newsmax reports.

FBI agent Ralph Himmelsbach was the case agent on the case, reported Kessler, who just authored the book “The Secrets of the FBI.” The case gained renewed interest when a woman claiming to be Cooper’s niece recently came forward, claiming she had heard her uncle talk about the heist. She has reportedly passed a polygraph test.

Kessler reports that Himmelsbach was the agent from the get go when Cooper boarded the Northwest Orient plane in Portland, Ore. He claimed to have a bomb and had the plane fly to the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, where he got the ransom money. He subsequently parachuted from the plane.”

“I chased his plane in an Army helicopter just for a while until the weather was so bad that they called us back, and then I continued working the case,” Himmelsbach told Newsmax.“Then when the money was found on a river bank, it was turned in to me, and five years to the day after the skyjacking I testified before the grand jury, and they indicted him for aircraft piracy.”

To read the full story click here.

Feds Make Big Stink; Bust 2 Chinese Men for Counterfeit Perfumes

authentic Polo Black

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Apparently the feds wanted to make a big stink out this case.

Two men from China — Shaoxiong Zhou, 42, and Shaoxia Huang, 33 — have pleaded guilty U.S. District Court in Brooklyn — to trafficking in counterfeit perfume. Zhou pleaded guilty Friday. His co-defendant pleaded on Aug. 3.

Authorities said the two admitted offering to supply counterfeit perfume to prospective buyers at a Las Vegas trade show in August 2010. The counterfeit perfume included the brands Lacoste, Polo Black and Armani Code.

Authorities said ultimately a cargo shipment containing counterfeit perfumes was purchased and shipped to the United States in 2011 and was seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents upon arrival.

New Mexico Gun Dealer Files Suit to Stop ATF Regulation of Reporting Sales in Border States

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The push back continues against an ATF regulation that would require gun dealers in four Mexican border states to report multiple gun sales of semi-automatic rifles.

An Albuquerque gun store has become the latest to file suit against the U.S. government to try and block the practice from taking effect on Aug. 14, the Associated Press reported. The states effected include New Mexico, Texas, Arizona and Calif.

Ron Peterson Firearms Peterson filed a lawsuit last week, AP reported. The news service reported that it was the third lawsuit to be filed to try and block the regulation from taking effect.

ATF spokesman Drew Wade told The Associated Press on Friday that his agency will vigorously defend the regulation.

Another lawsuit has been filed by National Shooting Sports Foundation, which represents the firearms industry, AP reported.