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Archive for July 2nd, 2012

Austrian Government Seeks FBI Help in Kidnapping Case

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Frustrated over the pace of an investigation into the 8-year abduction case of Natascha Kampusch, Austrian officials took the unusual step of requesting help from the FBI, The Independent reports.

The Austrian Parliament made the recommendation after spotting inconsistencies in the case that suggest an accomplice may have been involved.

Kampusch was abducted at the age of 10 off a street in Vienna in 1998. Her tormentor held her in a a specially built underground cell in his suburban home. In 2006, at age 18, she managed to escape.

Kampusch said an accomplice was in the van when she was abducted, but authorities pressured her to keep that observation quiet.

Ex-U.S. Immigration Agent Gets 30 Months for Helping Cartels

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A former U.S. federal immigration agent who passed on classified information to families with ties to Mexican drug cartels is to serve 30 months in prison, Reuters reports.

Jovana Deas was sentenced Friday following accusations that she illegally obtained and disseminated classified documents as a special agent for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in a small border town in Arizona.

According to court documents, Deas stole restricted crime and immigration databases and gave them to her former brother-in-law, Miguel Angel Mendoza Estrada, who belongs to a Mexican cartel with ties to drug traffickers in Brazil, Reuters reported.

Boehner: Republicans to Take Civil Action Against Obama’s Executive Privilege

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner said on Sunday that Republicans plan to file a civil suit to force the Justice Department to  release of more information on the botched ATF drug-running case known as Fast & Furious, ABC News reports.

The suit is the latest effort to force the release of related material after the Justice Department said it would not prosecute Attorney General Eric Holder, who was held in contempt of Congress last week for refusing to turn over the documents.

The Obama administration used executive privilege to block Congressional access to the records.

FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List Launched During Card Game

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list originated during a card game between FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and a reporter who was curious about the most slyest of fugitives, the LA Times reports.

In 1949, Hoover gave the reporter a list of 10 names that would appear on the front page of the Washington Daily News, leading to the arrests of nine of the 10.

The fugitives were escapees, con men, accused murders and a bank robber, chosen from a list of 5,700 fugitives on the run, the LA Times reported.

A year later, the top 10 list was born and would later include Martin Luther King’s assassin, James Earl Ray; Al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden; and serial killer Ted Bundy.

Column: Chicago’s U.S. Attorney Fitzgerald Will Return to Public Office: Count on It

Patrick Fitzgerald/doj photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Once in a while a U.S. Attorney comes along and makes a mark not only locally but nationally.

U.S. Patrick Fitzgerald of Chicago was one of those guys.

Fitzgerald resigned and left office last Friday, leaving behind a legacy that included prosecuting the ever-chatty ex-Gov. Rod Blagojevich and Dick Cheney’s right hand guy Scooter Libby.

He left office, offering little reflection last week to the hungry media. He said he has no plans, but hopes to make a decision by Labor Day, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

Among the U.S. Attorney’s, he was rock star. In the public’s eye, he was a modern-day Eliot Ness.

Was he perfect? No. But he inspired faith in the system and that the good guys had a strong hand to fight crime and corruption.

He was in Chicago for 11 years as prosecutor.

Whatever he does next — even if it’s going to law firm —  ultimately it would be hard to believe that the 51-year-old won’t end up back in public service, be it as a federal judge or FBI director or governor.

Count on it.

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