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Archive for August, 2013

Fort Hood Shooter Gets Death Sentence But Years of Appeals Will Stall Execution

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hasan, who killed 13 people and wounded more than 30, was sentenced to death Wednesday but likely will stay alive for years, if not decades, the Associated Press reports.

And it doesn’t matter if Nidal Hasan wants to be executed.

The military justice system requires years – even decades – of appeals before someone is executed, the AP wrote.

‘‘If he really wants the death penalty, the appeals process won’t let it happen for a very long time,’’ said Joseph Gutheinz, a Texas attorney licensed by the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. ‘‘The military is going to want to do everything at its own pace. They’re not going to want to let the system kill him, even if that’s what he wants.’’

Hasan sprayed bullets at soldiers who were heading overseas or returning from combat deployments in 2009.

FBI Has Domestic Version of Seal Team Six

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Meet the Seal Team Six of the FBI.

One of the nation’s most elite units, the FBI’s Hostage Rescue Team are decked out in camouflage and armed with HK416 assault rifles, The Week reports.

Think of them as the domestic version of the U.S. Navy SEALs.

They undergo similar training, use common techniques and technology and even chase down terrorists.

But there is a difference, former FBI Director Louis J. Freeh once said.

“The members of the HRT are not commandos.”

The qualifications are strict – experience as an FBI special agent and a grueling selection process, The Week wrote.

Border Patrol Prepares More Monitoring of Canadian Border in Detroit with New Office

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

DETROIT — In an effort to prevent terrorists from crossing the Canadian Border into the U.S., Border Patrol agents are gearing up for a new $17 million facility in Detroit, WWJ reports.

Agents gathered for a groundbreaking this week.

“We share intelligence, anything that’s got a nexus to the border and through the sharing of this intelligence we’re not working in silos so can coordinate efforts and basically maximize operations (and) security as a result of that,” Serge Cote, the officer in charge of the Windsor Royal Canadian Mounted Police, told WWJ.

The new building will offer more office space and parking and will provide new training facilities.

About 100 Border Patrol employees are expected to work there.

ATF Holds Seminars to Avoid Errors on Paperwork That Jeopardizes Cases

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Make a mistake on paperwork for a gun purchase can prevent authorities from tracking down a killer, the ATF warns, according to WDIO.com.

To avoid mistakes made in the past, the ATF is hosting a series of seminars starting in Minnesota.

ATF Senior Special Agent and Public Information Officer Robert Schmidt the idea is to “get the word out about proper documentation of firearm transactions.”

Improper documentation can kill a case, the ATF warned.

“We may not be able to get correct trace results,” Schmidt said to WDIO.com. “We may not be able to find out who the original purchaser of the firearm was,”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST


Report: FBI Could Have Prevented Fort Hood Massacre Had It Acted on Alarming Messages

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI could have prevented the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood if agents acted on alarming messages between the shooter and a radical cleric with ties to the 9/11 hijackers, Mother Jones reports.

FBI agents intercepted the messages nearly a year before Nidal Hasan opened fire at Fort Hood, according to an unclassified report that suggests agents could have prevented the deadly rampage.

The messages, which the FBI maintained were “fairly benign,” were anything but, Mother Jones described.

After reviewing an unclassified report the shooting, Mother Jones reported that the messages “offer a chilling glimpse into the psyche of an Islamic radical.”

The report also reveals how the bureau bungled the investigation of Hsasan.

Tucson Sector of Border Patrol Gets New Leader from Washington D.C.

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Felix Chavez, who served as deputy division chief of operations for Border Patrol at Washington  headquarters, is returning to the Tucson Sector to take the job as deputy chief patrol agent, Tucson News reports.

As an added bonus, Chavez is intimately familiar with the development and implementation of the 2012-16 National Border Patrol Strategic Plan. He’s also familiar with the challenges along the Southwest border, Tucson News wrote.

Chavez began his Border Patrol career in July 1985 at what is now the Sierra Blanca Station – or the El Paso Sector, as it was previously called.

NYPD Labels Entire Mosques As Terror Groups to Investigate Them and Their Followers

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The New York Police Department has identified entire mosques as terrorism organizations, allowing police to record sermons, spy on imams and use surveillance on those who attend prayer service, CBS News reports.

Although the NYPD has never criminally charged a mosque or Islamic organization, local police have launched at least a dozen so-called “terrorism enterprise investigations” targeting mosques, according to CBS News.

Documents obtained by CBS News show that many innocent New York Muslims were investigated and their names added to a secret police file.

By contrast, the FBI has not opened an enterprise investigation on a New York City mosque, CBS reports.

U.S., Mexican Authorities Search for Former Drug Lord, DEA Killer Who Was Released From Prison Early

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

So outraged by the early release of a 60-year-old former drug lord from a Mexican prison, U.S. and Mexican authorities are scrambling to track down the man who brutally killed an American DEA agent, Fox News reports.

The U.S. has expressed outrage that a Mexican court would allow Rafael Caro Quintero to be released shortly after midnight on Aug. 9. He was convicted of killing DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena.

The Mexican government planned to follow Quintero after his release but lost him after just 20 minutes, Fox News reported.

The release also threatens to damage relations between the two countries, according to Fox News.