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Archive for November 20th, 2013

Congressman Radel Pleads Guilty to Cocaine Charges

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
U.S. Rep. Trey Radel (R-Fla.) pleaded guilty Wednesday to a misdemeanor charge of possession of cocaine in D.C. Superior Court, the DEA announced.

D.C. Superior Senior Judge Robert S. Tignor placed Radel on one year of probation. The DEA press release said if the probation is successfully completed, the Court could dismiss the case without an adjudication of guilt.

The press release stated:

According to a statement of offense submitted as part of the plea, Radel came to the attention of the FBI and DEA in the fall of 2013, during an investigation into cocaine trafficking in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Agents learned that Radel would purchase cocaine for his personal use and sometimes share it with others.

The statement of offense says that, on Oct. 29, 2013, Radel met with an undercover police officer at a restaurant in the Dupont Circle area of Washington, D.C. At this time, Radel agreed to buy about 3.5 grams of cocaine from the undercover officer. He and the undercover officer went outside, and Radel handed over $260. The undercover officer provided Radel with a package of cocaine. Federal agents then approached Radel and the cocaine was recovered.

Radel agreed to speak with the agents about what had taken place and invited them to his apartment. There, he voluntarily admitted that he had purchased the cocaine. He also retrieved and provided to the agents a vial of cocaine that he had in his apartment.

 

 

AG Eric Holder to Decide Soon Whether to Charge George Zimmerman in Civil Rights Case

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

George Zimmerman may have been exonerated in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin, but that may change soon.

Attorney General Eric Holder is weighing whether to file federal civil rights charges against Zimmerman, who recently was arrested on unrelated domestic violence charges, Huffington Post reports.

Holder said his office is finishing up a civil rights investigation after Zimmerman shot and killed an unarmed 17-year-old.

In the past, Holder has referred to the incident as a “tragic, unnecessary shooting death.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST


A Friend Who Was a Victim of a Vicious Crime and the Rule of Law

 By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

A friend named Carolyne was a victim of a vicious and brutal crime last week.

Such a crime is especially distressing when its victim is such a gifted and empathic

person who has dedicated her life to making a difference in the lives of kids at risk.

Her advice and guidance have placed many children on the right path to productive lives.

This is not another Detroit crime story. Or even one that occurred in these United  States. It happened in Africa.

When I retired a few years ago, my Dad gave me some advice. “Don’t spend all of your time in pool halls.” He was joking because I never was very good at the game, but I have nevertheless attempted to follow his advice. This has led to meeting some amazing people, some here and some in other countries. Most of the time our interaction has had little to do with crime, but after three decades in the criminal justice business, it’s hard not to notice. Hence some columns on Honduras, Costa Rica, Mexico, as well as a bunch on the U.S. of A. This is another one.

Carolyne lives in a poor but peaceful country with a lot of good people, men and women, who are dedicated to improving the lives of their countrymen and women, and especially for the next generation. They are of different faiths, but they look up to America and are invariably friendly to visiting Americans.

But every nation has crime. It’s what is done in reaction to crime that matters.

Carolyne was attacked in her home by a gang of burglars and killers and badly beaten. The same group killed another woman earlier in the evening. The police were remarkably efficient and picked up one of the perpetrators in a short time.

After a session at the police station that satisfied the officers that they had the right guy, he was taken out to a field and killed.

The execution was not done by vigilantes or rogue cops. It was deliberately videotaped by law enforcement officers for their future use in presenting in graphic fashion the penalty for such crimes. The objective was deterrence, and it is hard to argue with its efficiency, at least when the police are right and the crime merits such a punishment.

Those who love Carolyne have mixed emotions about this ending. Mostly they are glad she is recovering and will hopefully soon be back at her school helping kids.

America has an imperfect criminal justice system, an unacceptably high crime rate, disparity and discrimination among similarly situated accused, and a sometimes tedious and laborious process of determining guilt or innocence.

 But whatever its imperfections, we have for over two centuries carved out the rule of law. And there are thousands of men and women who risk their lives daily to maintain and improve that rule of law. People who, in addition to doing their best to secure our safety, also protect the principle of every person’s right to a fair and meaningful day in court and a result that is reasoned and based on the law of this nation.

No criticism is intended of this African country. In fact, I am a great admirer of the country and its people. It would be presumptuous to moralize on an entirely different culture, with a different set of problems and a different history. I will leave to their citizens the judgment of how to protect the innocent and to punish the wrongdoers.

But I am reminded of the first time I stood outside the United States Department of Justice Building in Washington and read the inscription:

 No Free Government Can Survive that is not

Based on the Supremacy of the Law.

Where Law Ends, Tyranny Begins.

Law Alone Can Give us Freedom.

Parker: A Friend Who Was the Victim of A Vicious Crime and The Rule of Law

Ross Parker

 Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office. He is the author of the book “Carving Out the Rule of Law: The History of the United States Attorney’s Office in Eastern Michigan 1815–2008″.
  
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

A friend named Carolyne was a victim of a vicious and brutal crime last week.

Such a crime is especially distressing when its victim is such a gifted and empathic person who has dedicated her life to making a difference in the lives of kids at risk.

Her advice and guidance have placed many children on the right path to productive lives.

This is not another Detroit crime story. Or even one that occurred in these United  States. It happened in Africa.

When I retired a few years ago, my Dad gave me some advice. “Don’t spend all of your time in pool halls.” He was joking because I never was very good at the game, but I have nevertheless attempted to follow his advice. This has led to meeting some amazing people, some here and some in other countries. Most of the time our interaction has had little to do with crime, but after three decades in the criminal justice business, it’s hard not to notice. Hence some columns on Honduras, Costa Rica, Mexico, as well as a bunch on the U.S. of A. This is another one.

Carolyne lives in a poor but peaceful country with a lot of good people, men and women, who are dedicated to improving the lives of their countrymen and women, and especially for the next generation. They are of different faiths, but they look up to America and are invariably friendly to visiting Americans.

But every nation has crime. It’s what is done in reaction to crime that matters.

Carolyne was attacked in her home by a gang of burglars and killers and badly beaten. The same group killed another woman earlier in the evening. The police were remarkably efficient and picked up one of the perpetrators in a short time.

 

Read more »

Racist Serial Killer, Who Also Shot Larry Flynt, Was Executed Today in Missouri

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Racist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin was executed early this morning after a murderous cross-country spree from 1977 to 1980, the USA Today reports.

The 63-year-old, who targeted black and Jewish people, was executed in Missouri.

Franklin claimed responsibility for 20 murders but was convicted of seven.

He also has admitted he shot Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt, who was paralyzed in the 1978 attack.

 

Outspoken Black Nationalist Remains Homeland Security Employee Despite Racist Rants

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Homeland Security employee who is an outspoken black nationalist who preached about the “unavoidable, inevitable clash with the white race” is still on the payroll, The Blaze reports.

Ayo Kimathi was called out in August by the Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups.

“(I)n order for Black people to survive the 21st century, we are going to have to kill a lot of whites – more than our christian hearts can possibly count,” the website read.

Kimathi was suspended but still is an employee of Homeland Security.

“Mr. Kimathi was placed on administrative leave on August 23. ICE does not condone any type of hateful rhetoric or advocacy of violence of any kind against anyone,” U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement deputy press secretary Gillian Christensen said in an email to The Blaze.

Monument at Township Hall Honors Slain FBI Agent In Indiana Township, Pa.

Slain FBI Agent Sam Hicks/fbi photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It’s not big – a waist-high granite stone.

But the memorial signifies so much more.

For Charlotte Carrabotta, it’s a place to reflect on her son, Agent Samuel Hicks, who was gunned down in November 2008 while trying to serve a drug warrant in Indiana Township, Pa.,  reports TribLive.com.

The memorial for the 33-year-old slain FBI agent was unveiled Tuesday at the Indiana Township Town Hall.

“For five years I’ve held it together in public. But this is going to be hard to do today, because this has been such a personal project,” Carrabotta said, reports TribLive.com. “When I lay my head on my pillow at night, I struggle for answers and I struggle for peace. But here we are, still honoring our commitment to his memory. And I think Samuel would have been so proud of that.”

Busted! Congressman Caught Buying Cocaine in Joint Sting by FBI, DEA

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

U.S. Rep. Henry “Trey” Radel faces up to six months in jail after he was busted  for cocaine possession in a joint sting by the FBI and DEA, authorities announced Tuesday, the Associated Press reports.

The 37-year-old freshman lawmaker said he made an “extremely terrible choice” and has been struggling with alcoholism.

Radel was snagged in a “buy and bust” operation. On Oct. 29, Radel is accused of buying cocaine from an undercover sting.

“In facing this charge, I realize the disappointment my family, friends and constituents must feel. Believe me, I am disappointed in myself, and I stand ready to face the consequences of my actions,” Radel said in a statement.

“However, this unfortunate event does have a positive side. It offers me an opportunity to seek treatment and counseling,” his statement said. “I know I have a problem and will do whatever is necessary to overcome it, hopefully setting an example for others struggling with this disease.”