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Archive for January 7th, 2014

Burglars Behind 1971 Break-In at FBI Office in Philadelphia Tell All

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

While many Americans were watching a televised title bout between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier nearly 23 years, antiwar activists were breaking into the FBI office in Philadelphia and stealing confidential documents.

What happened that day was largely unknown until the author of a new book convinced five of the eight burglars to detail what happened, the New York Times reports.

The men and women, who can no longer be prosecuted, said they were motivated by the desire to expose the agency for using dirty tricks to spy on dissident groups.

They sent many of the records to newspaper reporters, unveiling widespread, extensive spying.

“When you talked to people outside the movement about what the F.B.I. was doing, nobody wanted to believe it,” said one of the burglars, Keith Forsyth. “There was only one way to convince people that it was true, and that was to get it in their handwriting.”

The new book is called “The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI.”

FBI: Man Accused of Burning Chinese Consulate Says He Was Hearing Voices

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Fears of terrorism initially spread after someone intentionally set fire to the Chinese consulate in San Francisco last week.

But CBS SF reports that the suspect, 39-year-old Yan Feng, may have been suffering from mental health problems after he told FBI agents that he was hearing voices in Chinese.

Feng was charged Monday with two counts of arson and willfully damaging property belonging to a foreign government.

According to FBI agent Michel Eldridge, the suspect “stated in substance that he targeted the Chinese consulate because all the voices he had been hearing were in Chinese and the Chinese consulate had to have been involved.”

Former Sesame Street Actor Tapped for High-Ranking Justice Department Post

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A child who grew up as an actor on Sesame Street in the 1970s was tapped by President Obama for a high-ranking Justice Department position, the USA Today reports.

Obama nominated Debo P. Adegbile to be the new assistant attorney general for civil rights.

If confirmed by the Senate, Adegbile will fill the position vacated by Tom Perez, the new secretary of labor, the USA Today wrote.

Border Patrol Agent Accused of Breaking into Elderly Woman’s Home Before Being Tasered

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 An inebriated U.S. Border Patrol agent is accused of breaking into the home of an elderly woman in New Mexico before being Tasered by police, the Silver City Sun-News reports

Authorities said Agent Nicholas Barton, 34, threw a pricey turquoise rock through the glass sliding door early Saturday morning in an attempt to gain access.

The victim,   Stella Norman, 79,  said she would have shot Barton if she had a gun.

Opinion: Why NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Doesn’t Deserve Celemency

Fred Kaplan
Slate

I regard Daniel Ellsberg as an American patriot. I was one of the first columnists to write that Director of National Intelligence James Clapper should be fired for lying to Congress. On June 7, two days after the first news stories based on Edward Snowden’s leaks, I wrote a column airing (and endorsing) the concerns of Brian Jenkins, a leading counterterrorism expert, that the government’s massive surveillance program had created “the foundation of a very oppressive state.”

And yet I firmly disagree with the New York Times’ Jan. 1 editorial (“Edward Snowden, Whistle-Blower”), calling on President Obama to grant Snowden “some form of clemency” for the “great service” he has done for his country.

It is true that Snowden’s revelations about the National Security Agency’s surveillance of American citizens—far vaster than any outsider had suspected, in some cases vaster than the agency’s overseers on the secret FISA court had permitted—have triggered a valuable debate,leading possibly to much-needed reforms.

If that were all that Snowden had done, if his stolen trove of beyond-top-secret documents had dealt only with the NSA’s domestic surveillance, then some form of leniency might be worth discussing.

But Snowden did much more than that.

To read more click here.

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