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Archive for January 5th, 2015

FBI Director Comey Speaks at Memorial Service of Slain NYPD Officer

FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Speaking at the memorial service of slain New York City Police Officer Wenjian Liu on Sunday, FBI Director James Comey said he was perplexed by the increase in police officer deaths in 2014, Fox News reports.

“One hundred and fifteen were killed last year,” Comey said at the service in Brooklyn. “That’s a shocking increase from 2013. I don’t understand evil and I cannot try.”

As many as 120 police officers were killed in the line of duty in 2014, compared to 76 in 2013.

Comey encouraged Americans to “make something good out of the tragedy … so that evil does not rule the day.”

Liu was killed Dec. 20 by a man who said on social media that he was seeking retaliation for the deaths of two unarmed black men in 2014.

Catch-22 for FBI Linguists Who Come Under Suspicion for Preparing for Job

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

How’s this for a Catch-22?

To be a linguist for the FBI, you typically need to spend a few years in a foreign country, creating ties with the residents and learning the language.

But living and developing ties in some foreign countries can raise red flags within the FBI, sometimes delaying career advancements, the Atlantic reports.

FBI employees with ties to some countries are placed in a program, Post-Adjudication Risk Management, or PARM, which requires employees to undergo additional polygraph tests, security screenings and other scrutiny.

“Thirteen years after the September 11 terrorist attacks, it’s worth asking whether such security safeguards do more harm than good,” the Atlantic ponders.

FBI Searches for ‘Ethical’ Hackers to Help Combat Increasing Cyber-Attacks

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The level of sophistication of today’s hackers has made it difficult for the FBI to combat cyber-attacks. 

With attacks on the rise, the bureau announced it’s looking for technology experts – even people with experience in “ethical hacking” – to become “cyber special agents,” the Chicago Tribune reports.

Cyber permeates every aspect of what we do, whether it’s counterterrorism, criminal investigations or traditional cyberattacks, as we’ve seen in the recent past,” the FBI said.

The job candidates must be both technologically savvy and loyal to the country.

“The FBI seeks highly talented, technically trained individuals who are motivated by the FBI’s mission to protect our nation and the American people from the rapidly evolving cyberthreat,” said Robert Anderson Jr., executive assistant director for the bureau’s criminal, cyber, response and services branch.

The job pays between $59,340 and $76,568 a year.

A four-year degree also is required, and candidates must be between the ages of 23 and 37.

Oversight Report Blasts Homeland Security for Failing on All Its Missions

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Homeland Security has failed on all five of its main missions, according to a scathing oversight report by U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn, Fox News reports. 

“Ten years of oversight of the Department of Homeland Security finds that the Department still has a lot of work to do to strengthen our nation’s security,” Coburn said.  “Congress needs to review the Department’s mission and programs and refocus DHS on national priorities where DHS has a lead responsibility.”

One unanswered question, according to the report, is whether the $50 billion that Homeland Security spent in the past 11 years on counterterrorism made the country any safer.

The report also criticizes Homeland Security for failing to properly protect the borders and combat cyber-attacks.

Still, Coburn said the future is bright if Congress acts quickly to resolve the problems.

“I am confident that Secretary Jeh Johnson is leading the Department in the right direction,” Coburn said.  “One of the biggest challenges that Sec. Johnson and DHS face is Congress and its dysfunctional approach to setting priorities for the Department.  Congress needs to work with the Department to refocus its missions on national priorities and give Secretary Johnson the authority to lead and fix the Department.”

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