best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

February 2015
S M T W T F S
« Jan   Mar »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Delaware Voice: Comey’s ‘History-Making Speech’ Reveals Important Truths

Director James B. Comey speaking in Orlando.

Leland Ware
Delaware Voice

On Feb. 12, FBI Director James B. Comey made what will be remembered as a history-making speech at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

In the speech, “Hard Truths: Law Enforcement and Race,” Comey said, “With the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, the death of Eric Garner in Staten Island, the ongoing protests throughout the country, and the assassinations of NYPD Officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos, we are at a crossroads.”

He went on to say, “Serious debates are taking place about how law enforcement personnel relate to the communities they serve, about the appropriate use of force, and about real and perceived biases, both within and outside of law enforcement.”

The most important point Director Comey made was about unconscious discrimination. He explained that “Much research points to the widespread existence of unconscious bias. Many people in our white-majority culture have unconscious racial biases and react differently to a white face than a black face.” The research to which Comey referred consists of numerous studies conducted over the last 30 years that have shown that racial prejudice is pervasive among many who consciously subscribe to a belief in racial equality. Many individuals who believe they have positive attitudes about racial minorities harbor unconscious racial prejudices.

Prejudice and stereotypes are the byproducts of ordinary perceptions, categorization, learning, memory and judgment. “Categorization” is the process by which ideas and objects are recognized, differentiated and understood. It is an essential brain function that enables individuals to reduce the enormous amounts of information they encounter every day to a manageable level. Categorization allows individuals to relate new experiences to old experiences; the unfamiliar becomes familiar. Each object and event is perceived, remembered, grouped into a category and identified. The process is automatic and operates in milliseconds.

To read more click here. 


Print This Post Print This Post

Write a comment

You need to login to post comments!