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Archive for February, 2016

Secret Service Agent Slams Photographer to Ground at Trump Rally

Time photographer is slammed to the ground by a Secret Service agent.

Time photographer is slammed to the ground by a Secret Service agent.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Secret Service agent grabbed a Time photographer by the throat and slammed him to the ground during a rally for Donald Trump in Virginia today.

The violent incident was captured in numerous videos as the photographer was trying to document a crowd of Black Lives Matters protesters, who had disrupted the event, Mashable reports. 

The agent stopped the photographer, who responded, “Fuck you.” The agent then choke-slammed the photographer.

Watch the bottom half of the gif to see what happened.

via GIPHY

The photographer, Christopher Morris, defended himself while on the ground, kicking the agent.

As the crowd witnessed the attack, Trump told supporters, “Are we having a good time?”

Morris said he was arrested.

“I never touched him,” he told WSET reporter Annie Andersen while he was being escorted away. “I tried to show the press lead what he did to me, and I said he choked me, so I put my hand on him, and that’s when I was arrested,” he said.

Apple’s Fight Against FBI Over Unlock iPhone Heads to Congress This Week

IPhone 6By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Apple and the FBI will take their fight over a locked iPhone to Congress this week.

FBI Director James Comey is scheduled to lay out his position before the House Judiciary Committee after Apple fought a court order to help the bureau unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters, The Hill reports. 

The same day, Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell will make his case in testimony during a second panel.

At issue is Apple’s refusal to create software to disable a feature that wipe a phone of its memory after an incorrect password is entered 1o times in a row.

“This is a huge issue which is very complex. It should not be decided by a single district judge in California, it should be decided right here,” Sen. Angus King (I-Maine) told The Hill this week. But, he added, “I don’t think we’re ready to articulate” what legislation is needed.

Ex-Secret Service Agent Not Humored by NYT Columnist’s Assassination Joke about Trump

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

At least one former Secret Service agent was not humored when a New York Times columnist joked that an assassination attempt would end Donald Trump’s presidential run.

Former Secret Service agent Dan Bongino told WND that the joke was “irresponsible, grotesque, despicable and ignorant.”

Columnist Ross Douthat tweeted Wednesday afternoon, “Good news guys I’ve figured out how the Trump campaign ends,” linking to a YouTube clip from the 1983 movie “Dead Zone” in which a political candidate holds up a baby as a human shield to prevent an assassination attempt.

Douthat removed the tweet and apologized, tweeting, “A lot readers were offended by my Trump/’Dead Zone’ joke from yesterday. I can see why, and I’ve deleted the tweet. Apologies.”

Bongino, who is an outspoken President Obama critic, was not impressed.

“The people are angry at Washington, D.C., and more importantly, the insider class, which includes people like this joker,” Bongino said. “People are angry at them because they feel like morally and ethically that these people live by a different code, and this guy’s code is clearly, ‘I’m gonna say or do whatever I want to anyone who doesn’t live by this connected insider set of rules,’ even if it means tweeting a tweet that suggests someone should kill the guy!

“I mean, how out of touch, ethically challenged and disgusting can this group of people get?”

Former CIA Director: Military May Reject Trump’s Orders If He Becomes President

Michael Hayden

Michael Hayden

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

If Donald Trump becomes president, there’s a real possibility that the U.S. military would refuse to follow his orders, said former CIA director Michael Hayden.

“I would be incredibly concerned if a President Trump governed in a way that was consistent with the language that candidate Trump expressed during the campaign,” Hayden said during an interview on HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher.”

Hayden said the concern is that Trump’s increasingly heated rhetoric would represent his foreign policy decisions.

Earlier this month, Trump said “torture works” and expressed support for waterboarding and other cruel interrogation techniques to get terrorists to divulge information.

Trump went a step further to say that other methods should be employed that are “so much worse” and “much stronger.”

“Don’t tell me it doesn’t work — torture works,” Trump told the Sun City retirement community. “Okay, folks? Torture — you know, half these guys [say]: ‘Torture doesn’t work.’ Believe me, it works. Okay?”

President Obama ended waterboarding during his first term in office.

“Let me give you a punchline: If he were to order that once in government, the American armed forces would refuse to act,” Hayden suggested.

Guardian Columnist: Calm Down, FBI. The Web Won’t Go Dark Anytime Soon

Apple logoJohn Naughton
Guardian

The Apple v FBI standoff continues to generate more heat than light, with both sides putting their case to “the court of public opinion” — which, in this case, is at best premature and at worst daft. Apple has just responded to the court injunction obliging it to help the government unlock the iPhone used by one of the San Bernadino killers with a barrage of legal arguments involving the first and fifth amendments to the US constitution. Because the law in the case is unclear (there seems to be only one recent plausible precedent and that dates from 1977), I can see the argument going all the way to the supreme court. Which is where it properly belongs, because what is at issue is a really big question: how much encryption should private companies (and individuals) be allowed to deploy in a networked world?

In the meantime, we are left with posturing by the two camps, both of which are being selective with the actualité, as Alan Clark might have said. Apple is staking a claim to the high moral ground: this is not just about one phone, it says, but about the security and privacy of millions of citizens everywhere. Agreeing to the FBI’s request to write a special version of the phone’s operating system that would disable its in-built blocking mechanism against automated password guessing would set a very dangerous precedent that governments everywhere would exploit. True, especially in China, where, coincidentally, Apple sells more iPhones than it does in the US.

The FBI, for its part, is trying a two-pronged approach. One is the soothing tone: don’t worry about a precedent, they say, we just want to get the data off this one phone. The FBI should tell that to the marines, or at any rate to prosecutors all over the US who have iPhones that they want Apple to unlock. The Manhattan district attorney, to name just one, has 175 of the darned things. So if Apple is forced to concede in the end, it’ll find a long queue at its door.

The other part of the FBI strategy is also to stake a claim to the high moral ground. James Comey, its director, has been sounding off for ages that cyberspace is “going dark” (ie invisible to law enforcement) because of encryption and that this is intolerable. Over here, the same line has been energetically peddled by David Cameron. “In extremis,” he said recently, “it has been possible to read someone’s letter, to listen to someone’s call, to mobile communications… The question remains: are we going to allow a means of communications where it simply is not possible to do that? My answer to that question is: no, we must not.”

To read more click here. 

Other Stories of Interest

Man Awarded $13.2M in wrongful FBI hair conviction case in Washington D.C.

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Santa A. Tribble spent 28 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

Tribble was convicted of killing a Washington D.C. taxi driver in 1978 because of a trial in which the prosecution exaggerated the reliability of FBI forensic hair matches.

On Friday, a D.C. Superior Court judge ordered the government to pay $13.2 million to Tribble for the wrongful conviction.

Tribble is the third Washington D.C. man to be awarded damages over the past year after prosecutors used exaggerated claims about the reliability of the hair matches, the Washington Post reports. 

Subsequent DNA testing showed that Tribble, who is now 55, “could not have contributed hairs” found in a stocking that the attacker reportedly used as a mask, the Post wrote.

A federal review last year revealed that FBI examiners often overstated the reliability of hair testing in testimony against criminal defendants for at least two decades before 2000.

The Justice Department on Wednesday said it will review cases involving similar “testimonial overstatement.”

Tribble’s “journey of injustice subjected [him] to all the horror, degradation, and threats to personal security and privacy inherent in prison life, each heightened by his youth, actual innocence, and life sentence,” D.C. Superior Court Judge John M. Mott wrote in a 48-page opinion Friday.

“Mr. Tribble’s ordeal did not merely deprive him of his liberty in a constitutional sense — it ruined his life, leaving him broken in body and spirit and, quite literally, dying,” Mott wrote.

Weekend Series on Crime: The Mafia Mob Rats Documentary

Republican Candidates United on Apple: Help FBI Unlock Terrorist’s Phone

GOP elephantBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

If Apple was hoping to find a supporter among the Republican presidential candidates, the company was disappointed after Thursday evening’s GOP debate.

Despite plenty of disagreement over immigration, the budget and foreign policy, the five candidates agreed on one thing: Apple should help the FBI unlock the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters.

“They are not asking Apple to create a backdoor to encryption,” Marco Rubio said, adding that “Apple doesn’t want to do it, because they think it hurts their brand.”

Sen. Ted Cruz said the issue was not about invading the privacy of all phone users.

“The order is not: put a backdoor in everyone’s cell phone. If that was the order, that order would be problematic, because it would compromise security and safety for everyone,” Cruz said. “But on the question of unlocking this cell phone of a terrorist, we should enforce the court order.”

John Kasich argued that President Obama should meet personally with Apple to urge the company to comply with the Justice Department’s request to open the phone.

“Lock the door, and say you’re not coming out until you reach an agreement that gives the security people what they need and protects the rights of Americans.”

Donald Trump was the only candidate who wasn’t asked about Apple, but on Twitter, he said, “Boycott Apple products until such time as Apple gives cellphone info to authorities regarding radical Islamic terrorist couple from Cal.”

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