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Archive for July 5th, 2016

FBI Director Comey Recommending No Charges Against Hillary in Email Probe

Screen Shot 2016-07-05 at 12.00.29 PM

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James Comey announced Tuesday that he won’t recommend criminal charges against Hillary Clinton in the State Department email probe.

The final decision is up to the Justice Department. But under the circumstances it would be highly unusual for the Justice Department to move forward with charges.

Comey said there was  evidence of potential violations of the law,  but “our judgment is that no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case. ”

“In looking back at our investigations into the mishandling or removal of classified information, we cannot find a case that would support bringing criminal charges on these facts,” he said.

Below is the full text of Comey’s remarks:

Good morning. I’m here to give you an update on the FBI’s investigation of Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal e-mail system during her time as Secretary of State.

After a tremendous amount of work over the last year, the FBI is completing its investigation and referring the case to the Department of Justice for a prosecutive decision. What I would like to do today is tell you three things: what we did; what we found; and what we are recommending to the Department of Justice.

This will be an unusual statement in at least a couple ways. First, I am going to include more detail about our process than I ordinarily would, because I think the American people deserve those details in a case of intense public interest. Second, I have not coordinated or reviewed this statement in any way with the Department of Justice or any other part of the government. They do not know what I am about to say.

I want to start by thanking the FBI employees who did remarkable work in this case. Once you have a better sense of how much we have done, you will understand why I am so grateful and proud of their efforts.

So, first, what we have done:

The investigation began as a referral from the Intelligence Community Inspector General in connection with Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal e-mail server during her time as Secretary of State. The referral focused on whether classified information was transmitted on that personal system.

Our investigation looked at whether there is evidence classified information was improperly stored or transmitted on that personal system, in violation of a federal statute making it a felony to mishandle classified information either intentionally or in a grossly negligent way, or a second statute making it a misdemeanor to knowingly remove classified information from appropriate systems or storage facilities.

Consistent with our counterintelligence responsibilities, we have also investigated to determine whether there is evidence of computer intrusion in connection with the personal e-mail server by any foreign power, or other hostile actors.

Read more »

How U-M Football Coach Bo Schembechler Inspired FBI’s First Probe Into Steroids in Sports

This column first appeared in the Ann Arbor Observer. It’s being republished with his permission.

By Greg Stejskal
ticklethewire.com

Featured_stejskal-and-bo_22400The late Bo Schembechler (left) and Greg Stejskal.

In reading recent accounts of state-sponsored use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs), primarily by Russia, I was struck by how quickly it was decided that the FBI would open an investigation. There hasn’t always been a keen interest in pursuing criminal investigations of PEDs in sports. Arguably, that interest began in Ann Arbor.

In 1988, when I was an agent in the FBI’s Ann Arbor office, Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler asked me to come to his office. Since 1982, I had been making presentations to Bo’s players about sports gambling, drugs, and violence against women.

Now he and Mike Gittleson, the Michigan strength and conditioning coach, wanted to discuss their concerns about the use of anabolic steroids by football players. These synthetic versions of testosterone have very limited legitimate medical uses–but the coaches were seeing athletes who abused them, taking dangerously high doses to promote abnormal growth and strength.

It wasn’t just college players. The coaches told me that even the high school players they were seeing in Michigan’s summer instructional camp were asking not whether they should use steroids but when they should start.

Bo knew the sale and possession of nonprescription steroids had recently been made a felony under federal law. He wanted to know what was being done to enforce the law. I told him I didn’t know but would find out.

Read more »

Stejskal: How the Late University of Michigan Coach Bo Schembechler Inspired FBI’s First Probe Into Steroids in Sports

Greg Stejskal served as an FBI agent for 31 years and retired as resident agent in charge of the Ann Arbor office. His column first appeared in the Ann Arbor Observer. It’s being republished with his permission.

By Greg Stejskal
ticklethewire.com

Featured_stejskal-and-bo_22400The late Bo Schembechler (left) and Greg Stejskal.

In reading recent accounts of state-sponsored use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs), primarily by Russia, I was struck by how quickly it was decided that the FBI would open an investigation. There hasn’t always been a keen interest in pursuing criminal investigations of PEDs in sports. Arguably, that interest began in Ann Arbor.

In 1988, when I was an agent in the FBI’s Ann Arbor office, Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler asked me to come to his office. Since 1982, I had been making presentations to Bo’s players about sports gambling, drugs, and violence against women.

Now he and Mike Gittleson, the Michigan strength and conditioning coach, wanted to discuss their concerns about the use of anabolic steroids by football players. These synthetic versions of testosterone have very limited legitimate medical uses–but the coaches were seeing athletes who abused them, taking dangerously high doses to promote abnormal growth and strength.

It wasn’t just college players. The coaches told me that even the high school players they were seeing in Michigan’s summer instructional camp were asking not whether they should use steroids but when they should start.

Bo knew the sale and possession of nonprescription steroids had recently been made a felony under federal law. He wanted to know what was being done to enforce the law. I told him I didn’t know but would find out.

Read more »

FBI Won’t Give Up on Norman Rockwell Painting Stolen 40 Years Ago

The Norman Rockwell painting was featured in the

The Norman Rockwell painting was featured in the Saturday Evening Post.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is not giving up on finding a Norman Rockwell painting that was stolen from a Cherry Hill, N.J. home 40 years ago.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that FBI is issuing a new appeal to find the “Taking a Break” painting, which depicts a weary farmboy.

The oil painting was featured on the cover of a 1919 issue of the Saturday Evening Post.

The painting was among several items stolen from the home of Robert and Teresa Grant on June 30, 1976.

Woman Captured 3 Days After Being Placed on Top 10 Most Wanted List

Shanika Minor was added to the FBI's Top 10 Most Wanted list.

Shanika Minor was added to the FBI’s Top 10 Most Wanted list.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Just three days after Shanika Minor was placed on the FBI’s Top Ten Most Wanted list, she was arrested at a motel in North Carolina.

Fox 6 reports that Minor, who was wanted for the murder of a pregnant woman, was on the run for nearly four months after the fatal shooting.

The family of the victim, Tamecca Perry, expressed gratitude.

“I want to tell whoever turned her in, thank you. Thank you,” Elaine Freeman, Perry’s aunt said.

Records: CIA Imprisoned, Interrogated Man Knowing He Was Innocent

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

CIA headquarters

CIA headquarters

New records reveal that the CIA imprisoned and interrogated a man that investigators knew was not a terrorist.

McClathy reports that the CIA realized it imprisoned the wrong man, a German citizen named Khaleed al-Masri, in Afghanistan.

Al-Mari was held in a secret prison with a “small cell with some clothing, bedding and a bucket for his waste,” according to a recently released internal CIA report.

McClathy wrote:

Adding to the sense of injustice: Even though the agency realized early on that al-Masri was the wrong man, it couldn’t figure out how to release him without having to acknowledge its mistake. The agency eventually dumped him unceremoniously in Albania and essentially pretended his arrest and detention had never happened.

Lawsuit Claims Airpot Security Arrested, Assaulted Young Woman with Disabilities

Screen Shot 2016-07-05 at 3.58.01 AMBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 19-year-old woman who had an impairment from radiation and the removal of a bran tumor was assaulted by security workers at a Memphis International checkpoint, according to a lawsuit.

WREG-TV reports that Hannah Cohen was flying home to Chattanooga on June 30, 2015, after receiving treatment that limited her ability to talk, walk, see and hear.

The security alarm confused Cohen because of her condition.

“The security personnel failed to recognize that she was confused because of her obvious disability and was unable to cooperate with the search,” Cohen’s lawyers, Kelly Pearson and William Hardwick, wrote in the lawsuit.

Police ignored the mother’s explanations, she said.

“She’s trying to get away from them but in the next instant, one of them had her down on the ground and hit her head on the floor. There was blood everywhere,” Shirley Cohen said.

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