best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

December 2016
S M T W T F S
« Nov   Jan »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Bloomberg: Homeland Security Entails More Than Protecting Border

Marine Gen. John Kelly

Marine Gen. John Kelly

By Editorial Board
Bloomberg

John Kelly, the retired Marine four-star general who is Donald Trump’s reported pick to head the Department of Homeland Security, is admirably suited to defending U.S. borders. More surprisingly, he may also moderate some of Trump’s more extreme positions on illegal immigration — which would help both the U.S. and its neighbors.

During his three-year-plus stint as head of the U.S. Southern Command, Kelly focused on the threat posed by Latin American drug traffickers who supply almost all of the cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine entering the U.S. He also warned repeatedly that the same smuggling networks that facilitate the trade in drugs, illegal workers, sex slaves and endangered wildlife could also enable the infiltration of terrorists.

Yet Kelly’s approach wisely went beyond interdiction and military training and support. As he told Congress, “95 percent of my efforts are not military. It’s economic development.”

Kelly was a champion of the Alliance for Prosperity, the nearly $1 billion program of assistance for Central America passed last December by Congress with bipartisan support. It concentrates not just on law and order, but also on strengthening institutions, building infrastructure and promoting regional integration.

In dealing with the U.S.’s southern neighbors, Kelly has stressed the idea of partnership. He knows how important it is to share intelligence, for instance, and how that in turn requires cooperation rather than coercion. And he’s acknowledged that the flow of people from Central America to the U.S. is driven partly by gang violence associated with the U.S. demand for illegal narcotics.

He knows, as he himself put it, that “a wall by itself will not work.”

Persuading his boss and Cabinet colleagues to adopt a more enlightened — that is, comprehensive — approach to border control and illegal immigration will be one of his biggest challenges.

To read more click here. 


Print This Post Print This Post

Write a comment

You need to login to post comments!