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Archive for April 25th, 2017

Oregon Man Charged After Calling FBI 752 Times And Making Threats

phoneBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 45-year-old Oregon man accused of calling the FBI phone line 752 times since December 2015 and leaving threats for agents is facing a federal criminal charge.

Authorities said Shawn Fredrick Weatherhead of Eugene called the line in April and declared, “I have a legal right to start killing you people. And I’m going to,” The Oregonian reports. 

On April 2, Weatherfield added in a message, “I’m going to start killing people.”

Weatherman was charged with interstate communication of a threat to injure another person, according to a complaint filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Eugene.

It’s not the first time Weatherman was charged for making inappropriate calls to a law enforcement agency. In June 2015, he was sentenced to 10 days of jail after pleading guilty to five counts of telephonic harassment. A condition of his probation was that he not have contact with any law enforcement agency unless it’s an emergency.

Homeland Security Secretary Admits He Doesn’t Know How to Stop Homegrown Terrorism

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Stopping homegrown terrorism is no easy task.

No one knows that more than Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, who admitted Sunday that he doesn’t know how to stop what he describes as the “most common” threat facing the U.S.

Kelly made the admission during an interview on CBS’s Face the Nation

“There are so many aspects to this terrorist thing,” Kelly said. “Obviously you got the homegrown terrorists. I don’t know how to stop that. I don’t know how to detect that. You got other terrorist threats that come across the border. I believe in the case of the murder, in the Paris shooting I believe he was homegrown. But, again, there are so many threats that come in from across border. And it’s essential absolutely to control one’s border.”

Kelly said homegrown terrorism is “the most common threat” to America.

Kelly said the threat of homegrown terrorism keeps him “literally awake at night.”

Beleaguered Secret Service Expected to Get Retired Marine As New Leader

Retired Marine Gen. Randolph Alles, via CBP.

Retired Marine Gen. Randolph Alles, via CBP.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The troubled Secret Service, which has been in the news for a number of embarrassing and alarming blunders, is about to get a new leader.

That leader is expected to be Retired Marine Gen. Randolph Alles, who currently serves as the U.S. Customs and Border deputy, Politico reports

William Callahan, the deputy director of the Secret Service, was serving as the interim director since March 4, when the former director Joseph Clancy retired.

Politico wrote:

The Secret Service has faced repeated breaches and controversies since President Donald Trump entered the White House earlier this year, with two agents reportedly fired over a fence jumping incident in early March.

Alles’ expected appointment comes after a search that purposefully looked outside of the Secret Service ranks — and process that hasn’t exactly been popular among former agents. The 6,500-person bureau has its own unique characteristics and culture, which are often best understood by someone who has served on a protective detail.

Border Patrol Pursuit Leaves 7 Injured After SUV Carrying Illegal Immigrants Crashed

border-patrol-san-diego-sectorBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Seven Mexican nationals were injured when an SUV being pursued by Border Patrol agents crashed in Chula Vista, Calif. on Sunday.

The pursuit began early Sunday afternoon, when an agent spotted a 2000 Ford Expedition SUV and suspected it was carrying illegal immigrants, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports

About three minutes into the pursuit, the SUV veered off the freeway and rolled down an embankment.

All seven occupants were injured, and two people sustained major injuries.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether anyone was arrested.

Other Stories of Interest

President Trump Is Wrong about Border Wall Fixing Drug Problem, Experts Say

Border Port of Entry.

Border Port of Entry.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s claim that a wall will stop illegal drugs from coming across the Southwest border ignores a key fact about the international trade.

Most drugs that cross the border are primarily transported into the U.S. through existing border checkpoints using cars and trucks, the Washington Post reports, citing experts on the drug trade. 

Nevertheless, Trump continues to tout the wall as a solution to stemming the flow of drugs into the U.S.

“The Wall is a very important tool in stopping drugs from pouring into our country and poisoning our youth (and many others)!” the president tweeted this week. “If the wall is not built, which it will be, the drug situation will NEVER be fixed the way it should be!”

Mexican drug cartels “transport the bulk of their drugs over the Southwest border through ports of entry (POEs) using passenger vehicles or tractor trailers,” the DEA writes in its 2015 National Drug Threat Assessment. “The drugs are typically secreted in hidden compartments when transported in passenger vehicles or comingled with legitimate goods when transported in tractor trailers.”

Drug policy experts say it’s a false narrative to suggest drug smugglers primarily run drugs across remote stretches of the border.

“Smuggling drugs in cars is far easier than carrying them on the backs of people through a really harsh desert terrain,” said Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. “The higher the fence will be, the more will go through ports of entry.”