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Trump’s Son-in-Law Kushner Is Subject of Special Counsel’s Russia Probe

Jared Kushner. Photo by Lori Berkowitz Photography, via Wikipedia

Jared Kushner. Photo by Lori Berkowitz Photography, via Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s son-in-law and key aide Jared Kushner is the subject of an investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller.

The Washington Post reported that Kushner’s business dealings have cast suspicions around the political newcomer who has become an integral part of Trump’s administration.   

Kushner’s attorney, Jamie Gorelick, suggested the inquiry is just “standard practice.”

“We do not know what this report refers to,” Jamie Gorelick, Kushner’s attorney, said in a statement to CNN. “It would be standard practice for the special counsel to examine financial records to look for anything related to Russia. Mr. Kushner previously volunteered to share with Congress what he knows about Russia-related matters. He will do the same if he is contacted in connection with any other inquiry.”

Kushner is expected to be the latest high-profile member of Trump’s administration to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee, though no date has been selected yet.

CNN reported in March that Kushner met secretly with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak, the same official that Attorney General Jeff Sessions eventually acknowledged he met with at least two times during the presidential campaign. CNN also reported last month that Kushner may have tried to create a secret channel of communications between Trump’s transition team and top Russian officials, including Kislyak. 

Sessions failed to disclose his meetings with Kislyak, but later acknowledged that he had met with the ambassador twice. During a Senate hearing this week, Sessions said it’s possible he met a third time with the ambassador at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington D.C., but the attorney general insisted under oath that he couldn’t recall.


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