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Archive for November 27th, 2017

Cat Hair, Cigarettes Lead FBI to Woman Accused of Sending Bomb to Obama

Cat photo by Steve Neavling.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Cat hair and a pack of cigarettes helped lead the FBI to a woman accused of sending a bomb to President Obama, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and the Social Security Administration near Baltimore.

Julia Poff, who is accused of sending the improvised explosive devices, was captured after the FBI found several unusual clues, RT.com reports.

“Cat hair was found under the address label,” the indictment reads. “The cat hair on the Obama package was microscopically consistent with the hair of one of Poff’s cats.”

The FBI also found remains of a cigarette box used to make one of the bomb, and on the pack was a sticker that identified the store where the tobacco was purchased. Bank statements show Poff bought cigarettes at the same store.

Poff is being held pending trial and could be sentenced to life in prison or death.

The Hill: Why Trump Needs to Appoint a New DEA Head to Combat Opioid Crisis

Synthetic opioid tablets

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s declaration of war against the opioid crisis is missing a critical weapon – the appointment of a new DEA administrator.

So says Emanuele Ottolegnhi, an opinion contributor to The Hill.

Ottolegnhi writes:

The new DEA administrator should have a clear vision for addressing the international dimension of the drug crisis, as well as the wreckage at home. In particular, the president should choose a DEA chief who not only understands the complex and global nature of drug cartels but is also cognizant of the growing convergence between transnational organized crime and terrorist groups like Hezbollah.

On that front, the first item on the new chief’s agenda should be to remove the handcuffs the Obama administration put on the DEA’s efforts to fight Hezbollah, for fear of scuttling the nascent Iran nuclear deal.

In the past decade, Hezbollah’s growing involvement in transnational organized crime has evolved into a multi-billion dollar global enterprise endorsed and coordinated by the group’s top leaders. Hezbollah’s involvement in producing and selling counterfeit medicines such as Captagon — a powerful amphetamine — is well documented and so is its growing involvement in cocaine trafficking.

Cocaine consumption has not reached the pandemic levels of the opioid crisis but is nonetheless an acute and growing threat. The use and availability of cocaine is on the rise; overdose deaths in 2015 were the highest since 2007. Less well understood are the close ties between cocaine trafficking and terrorism. One clear illustration is the recent extradition, from Paraguay to Miami, of suspected Hezbollah drug trafficker Ali Chamas. Court documents show that he was part of a larger network, likely based in Colombia. At the time of his arrest, he was conspiring to export as many as 100 kilos of cocaine a month to the U.S by air cargo.

To read more click here.

Other Stories of Interest

Funeral Held for Border Patrol Agent Whose Grisly Death Remains a Mystery

Border Patrol Agent Rogelio Martinez was found dead at the bottom of a ravine in west Texas.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Border Patrol agent was laid to rest Saturday following his mysterious death at the bottom of a culvert in the Texas desert. 

Family, friends and law enforcement officers attended the funeral at a Catholic church in El Paso, Texas, to mourn the death of Rogelio Martinez, 36, the Washington Post reports

Martinez’s U.S. flag-draped coffin was carried by Border Patrol pallbearers in green uniforms while bagpipes played.

“It honors him to see law enforcement agencies from across the United States” attend the service, Border Patrol spokesman Ramiro Cordero told reporters outside the church.

Martinez, who was responding to a triggered sensor on Sunday night in west Texas, was found with “traumatic head injuries” and broken bones. He died early Sunday from head injuries.

His partner, who has not been identified, also was found with head injuries and had been in critical condition last week.

The union representing Border Patrol officers insist the agents were attacked with rocks, but the FBI is not so sure.

FBI Fails to Warn Scores of U.S. Officials Who Were Targeted by Russian Hack

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As Russian hackers tried to hack into the personal Gmail accounts of dozens of U.S. officials, the FBI failed to provide a warning despite having at least a year’s worth of evidence that they were being targeted by the Kremlin.

Of nearly 80 Americans targeted by a Russian government-connected cyber-espionage group, Fancy Bear, only two officials were notified of the attack, the Associated Press has found

“It’s utterly confounding,” said Philip Reiner, a former senior director at the National Security Council, who was notified by the AP that he was targeted in 2015. “You’ve got to tell your people. You’ve got to protect your people.”

The FBI declined to discuss cyber campaign, but provided a statement: “The FBI routinely notifies individuals and organizations of potential threat information.”

Among those targeted were the former head of cybersecurity for the U.S. Air Force, a former head of the Defense Intelligence Agency, and an ex-director at the National Security Council.

The FBI knew about the hacking attempts for more than a year. A senior official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the number of attacks overwhelmed the bureau.

FBI: Background Checks for Guns Surge to Record High on Black Friday

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Black Friday continues to break records for the number of requests for background checks for gun purchases.

The bureau received 203,086 requests for background checks Friday, breaking the record of 185,713 in 2016 and 185,345 in 2015.

Anyone who wants to purchase a gun at a federally licensed dealer is required to undergo background checks.

The numbers come from the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System, a government database used for background checks on gun buyers.

The number of background checks have increased every year since the Sandy Hook elementary school massacre in Connecticut.

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