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Archive for April 6th, 2018

FBI’s Top Congressional Liaison Quietly Steps Down for Private Sector Job

Greg Bower, FBI’s former top liaison for Congress during probe of Russia.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s top liaison on Capitol Hill quietly left his job on March 30.

Greg Brower, an FBI assistant director who ran the bureau’s Office of Congressional Affairs, began a new job this week as a shareholder in the litigation department of the Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck law firm.

Then-FBI Director James Comey, who was fired by President Trump’s administration last year, made Brower, a senior lawyer, his deputy counsel and later a congressional liaison.

Brower said his departure had nothing to do with Comey’s firing or the most recent termination of the former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe.

“No circumstances, other than I had just accepted an offer from Brownstein some weeks earlier, so I happened to make the transition this week,” Brower told BuzzFeed News. “I think Chris Wray’s doing an outstanding job, and I have an excellent working relationship with Chris, but I couldn’t pass up the offer.”

Other Stories of Interest

Celebrated Civil Rights Photographer Doubled As a Secret FBI Informant

Ernest Withers

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Photographer Ernest Withers won over the trust of civil rights leaders, capturing some of the most iconic images of the civil rights era.

He snapped some of the storied photos from the time – Martin Luther King Jr. riding on one of the first integrated buses in Montgomery, the Little Rock school integration showdown and the dramatic moment in a Mississippi court room when Emmett Till’s great uncle pointed an accusing finger at the abductor of his great-nephew.

His presence was so ubiquitous and his photos so powerful that he won the trust of civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King, who considered Withers a friend.

But the beloved photographer wasn’t just recording history. He was an FBI informant who shared a plethora of inside information to the bureau that had surveilled King Jr. for years.

Withers’ double life was exposed in 2010 by dogged Memphis reporter Marc Perrusquia, who exposed the photographer’s double life in the pages of the Commercial Appeal. But the story raised more questions than it answered because the FBI declined to turn over once-classified documents.

Perrusquia sued the FBI and won, giving him thousands of records that confirmed Perrusquia was a very active informant who provided inside information from 1958 to 1976.

Just short of the 50th anniversary of King’s assassination this week, Perrusquia published a 344-page hardcover book about Withers’ double life – “How the FBI Used a Famous Photographer to Infiltrate the Civil Rights Movement.”

Perrusquia recently explained his motive to write the book during an interview with the Tennesseean newspaper:  One of the main things I want people to understand is that I’m not trying to erode Ernest Wither’s place in history as a legitimate Civil Rights figure. I’m just trying to cast a light on this hidden history that wasn’t known before. The stuff that Withers did for the FBI does not eclipse what he did for the movement, but it does rival it. His story is instructive to readers who want to learn from history. These government operations were very corrosive to our democracy. This story provides a good lesson for this country going forward — freedom of speech, the right to protest — these are cherished American values that we don’t want eroded because views are either unpopular or considered dangerous.