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FBI Director Seeks to Bring ‘Normalcy’ to Bureau in Midst of ‘Turbulent Times’

FBI Director Christopher Wray in Atlanta. Photo via FBI.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

When President Trump offered Christopher Wray the top position in the FBI, the former assistant attorney general knew his job would not be easy.

After all, his boss – Trump – was trying to convince the public that the top law enforcement agencies were out to get him and could not be trusted. The FBI, the president insisted repeatedly and loudly, was part of a political “witch hunt”intent on running him out of office.

This month, Wray entered his second year as the director of the FBI, replacing James Comey after the president fired him in May 2017, prompting the assistant attorney general to appoint a special counsel to investigate Russian meddling during the 2016 presidential election.

As Trump continues to try to discredit the FBI, Wray said Thursday that he is trying to usher in “normalcy” in the midst of “turbulent times.”

“My big point of emphasis has been that even though we live in tumultuous times, turbulent times, I’m trying to bring calm, stability — dare I say it — normalcy, in an environment where I think there’s an appetite for that,” Wray said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal Thursday.

The drama continued this week with the firing of special agent Peter Strzok for sending anti-Trump text messages during the presidential election.

On a weekly basis, Trump derides the FBI, Justice Department and special counsel Robert Mueller on Twitter – his preferred means of spewing out criticism.

“Social media commentary has its place, but that’s not what drives our work,” he said.

Wray described his relationship with the president as “professional.”

Still, Wray defended Rod Rosenstein, the assistant attorney general who has caught much of the criticism for hiring Mueller.

Wray declined to address the Republicans who are beating the drum for Trump.

“I’m not going to be weighing in, commenting on other’s opinions,” he said.

Wray said he won’t let outside criticism hinder his focus on the FBI and its mission.

“I’m a big believer in the idea that actions speak louder than words, and so what I look at is what do I see in terms of people’s commitment to the mission, success in the mission, desire to work here,” he said. “Our focus is our oath, our mission, the rule of law.”


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