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Tag: Alaska

Head of U.S. Border Patrol in Blaine Was Removed from His Position

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

John C. Bates, the head of the U.S. Border Patrol’s Blaine Sector, was removed from his post Monday after serving for six years as chief patrol agent for the sector, the Bellingham Herald reports.

The reason, however, remained a mystery this morning after authorities declined to say what happened.

Bates was in charge of protecting the borders of Washington, Alaska and Oregon.

He had been with the agency since 1985.

Blaine is the second leader to be removed from the Blaine sector in the last five years. A deputy chief was arrested for having sex with an underage girl, according to the Bellingham Herald.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Inside a Serial Killer’s Mind: FBI Releases Blood-Soaked Prose of Admitted Alaskan Serial Killer

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI released blood-soaked, handwritten prose found beneath the body of an admitted serial killer in Alaska.

While the writings don’t shed more light on his crimes, they open a window into the mind of an obsessed murderer, CNN reports.

Israel Keyes, who killed himself in jail in December, said he killed at least eight people.

Some of the writings appear to allude to taking a life.

“Your wet lips were a promise of a secret unspoke,” Keyes wrote. “Nervous laugh it burst like a pulse of blood from your throat. There will be no more laughter here.”

 STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

Alaska Serial Killer Leaves Behind Bloody Pages of Poetry, Ramblings

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

At first, the handwritten notes were too bloody to read.

So the letters, which were found beneath Alaska serial killer Israel Keyes’s body after he committed suicide by slitting his wrists, were sent to an FBI lab in Virginia for restoration, the Associated Press reports.

The notes provided investigators with no details about the crimes, such as the names of victims, but the yellow legal pad contained poetry about American materialism and disturbing writings about an unidentified victim, the AP reported

“Land of the free, home of the lie, land of the scheme, Americanize! Consume what you don’t need, stars you idolize, pursue what you adore it is a dream, then its American die,” Keyes wrote.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

FBI Lists Top Terrorism Cases of 2012

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The threat of terrorism always looms, particularly since Sept. 11, 2001.

The FBI, which can take some credit for averting some potential terrorist attacks, has put together a list of of some of the top terrorist cases of 2012.

The following was posted on the FBI website.

Alabama men arrested on terrorism charges: Two U.S. citizens living in Alabama were arrested in December and charged with planning to travel overseas to wage violent jihad. The pair met online and later confided their plans to an individual who—unbeknownst to them—was a confidential source working for the FBI. Details

 Plot to destroy Ohio bridge: Four men were sentenced to prison in November for their role in a conspiracy to destroy a bridge near Cleveland. The men—all self-proclaimed anarchists—pled guilty to conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction. The group allegedly planned a series of crimes in the Cleveland area. Details

 Conspiracy to provide support to terrorists: Four men were charged in Los Angeles in November with conspiring to provide material support to terrorists after they allegedly made arrangements to join al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan to kill Americans, among others. Details

 Plot to attack Pentagon and U.S. Capitol: Also in November, a 27-year-old man was sentenced in Boston to 17 years in prison for plotting an attack on American soil and attempting to provide detonation devices to terrorists. The man built detonators for improvised explosive devices and provided them to FBI undercover operatives he believed were members of al Qaeda. Details

 Attempted bombing of New York Federal Reserve Bank: A 21-year-old Bangladeshi national was arrested in October for attempting to detonate a 1,000-pound bomb in Lower Manhattan to strike the U.S. financial system on behalf of al Qaeda. The man allegedly traveled to the U.S. in January 2012 specifically to conduct a terrorist attack. Details

Plot to attack U.S. Capitol: A 29-year-old Virginia resident was sentenced to 30 years in prison in September for attempting to carry out a suicide bomb attack at the U.S. Capitol in February 2012. Details

Plan to send weapons to Iraqi Insurgents: A former resident of Iraq residing in Kentucky pled guilty to terrorism charges in August for attempting to send Stinger missiles and other weapons to Iraq to be used against U.S. soldiers. Details

‘Revolution’ leader sentenced: A New York City resident was sentenced in June to more than 11 years in prison for using his position as a leader of the Revolution Muslim organization to promote violent extremism online against those he believed to be enemies of Islam. Details

 Violent extremists in Alaska: Also in June, the leader of an Alaska militia was found guilty of conspiring to murder federal officials and possessing illegal firearms including silencers and grenade launchers. Details

 Supporting terrorism: A 45-year-old Philadelphia resident was arrested in March and charged with conspiracy to provide material support to the Islamic Jihad Union, an extremist organization responsible for bombings and attacks against coalition forces in Afghanistan. Details

 

FBI Seeks Help from Public in Solving Coastguard Killings

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

More than 100 people memorialized two slain U.S. Coastguard employees in Alaska last week as “full of honor, courage and passion for their families,” but the FBI offered little closure on their deaths.

The L.A. Times reports that the April 12th shooting of Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Hopkins and civilian employee Richard Belisle at a Kodiak communications station remain unresolved with no arrests. The FBI is seeking information from the public about two vehicles that may have been used in connection with the shooting: a white 2002 Dodge Ram pickup and a blue 2001 Honda CRV.

FBI spokesman Darrin Jones stressed there is no indication that the public is at risk. Meanwhile, various local Kodiak news outlets reported a search of the home of the victims’ coworker, according to the Times.

To read more click here.

 

FBI Hunts for Killer in Coast Guard Slaying in Alaska

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A murder mystery in Alaska has set the FBI off on a hunt.

Reuters reports that FBI agents are trying to determine who fatally shot two U.S. Coast Guard employees last week at a communications station on Alaska’s Kodiak Island.

“No arrests have been made in connection with the shootings,” FBI agent Eric Gonzalez said, according to Reuters. “We are obviously trying to determine the person responsible for the murders.”

To read more click here.

Column: Stevens Case Shows that Prosecutors Need Supervision

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens/campaign photo

Michael Carey is the former editorial page editor of the Anchorage Daily News and the host of the weekly public affairs show “Alaska Edition” for Alaska Public Television.

 By Michael Carey
Los Angeles Times

ANCHORAGE — As his trial on corruption charges approached in the fall of 2008, Ted Stevens railed to me in an email: “What did I do, Michael? What did I do?” The wounded rage smoldering in that rhetorical question to a reporter reflected his belief that he had done nothing wrong. He continued to insist on his innocence after aWashington, D.C., jury found him guilty of lying on financial disclosure forms.

Stevens’ conviction was dismissed in 2009 after the Justice Department’s admission that government lawyers failed to turn over evidence the Stevens defense should have received. U.S. District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan, who presided over Stevens’ trial, soon authorized an investigation of the prosecutors’ conduct, a move as rare as the trial of a U.S. senator.

Last week, the judge’s investigator, Special Counsel Henry F. Schuelke, issued his findings, which Stevens will never read. He died in a 2010 airplane accident.

To read full column click here.

Taxpayers Dish Out Nearly $1.8 Million to Defend Lawyers in Failed Prosecution of Late Ted Stevens

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens

Brad Heath
USA Today

WASHINGTON – The federal government has spent nearly $1.8 million defending prosecutors from allegations they broke the law in the botched corruption case against former Alaska senator Ted Stevens, Justice Department records show.

The case against Stevens fell apart three years ago when the Justice Department admitted its attorneys had improperly concealed evidence that could have helped his defense. A court-ordered investigation concluded in November that prosecutors had engaged in “significant, widespread, and at times intentional misconduct,” but that they should not face criminal contempt-of-court charges.

Records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show that the department has paid about $1.6 million since 2009 to private lawyers representing the six prosecutors targeted by that court investigation. It also paid $208,000 to defend three prosecutors from a separate finding that they had committed civil contempt of court.

To read more click here.