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Tag: assistant director

Leader of Albany’s FBI Office to Head Up FBI Washington Field Office

Andrew Vale

Andrew Vale

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Andrew Vale, special agent in charge of the Albany office, is leaving his post at the end of the month to become assistant director in charge of the bureau’s Washington D.C. field office.

Vale may best be known as the leader of the investigation into the first bombing of the World Trade Center, the Times Union reports. 

“It is with tremendously mixed emotions,” Vale said about his departure in an interview at his office. “This area has become home for me and my family.”

The FBI has only three assistant directors in the country – one at each field office in New York City, Los Angeles and Washington D.C.

“Really I just wanted to make a difference,” Vale, a 25-year-veteran of the FBI said. “I kind of viewed the FBI as being elite and wanted to work for an organization that was all about making a difference in the communities that we served.”

First Hispanic to Run FBI’s Largest Field Office Keeps Low Profile

Diego Rodriguez

Diego Rodriguez

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Before Diego Rodriguez became the first Hispanic person to run the FBI’s largest field office, he turned down an offer in the late 1980s to join the bureau.

“I’m really happy teaching. Thanks, but no thanks,” he recalled saying, the Associated Press reports.

But Rodriguez eventually decided to join the FBI and began working drug cases.

More than 25 years later, Rodriguez oversees about 2,000 agents working on cases raining from terrorism and insider trading to cyber fraud and public corruption. He is the assistant director in charge of the FBI’s New York office.

Rodriguez has kept a low profile.

“I genuinely care about their cases, but I’m not a micro-manager,” Rodriguez, 50, said in a recent interview in his lower Manhattan office. “They’ve got their own chain of command. The head of the office doesn’t need to be meddling in certain things.”

The Associated Press wrote:

Rodriguez’s modesty is rooted in humble beginnings: He was born in Colombia and moved to New York City with his family as an infant. He spent his childhood in working-class Queens, where his father turned him in to a lifelong soccer fan by taking him to see the legendary Pele play for the New York Cosmos.

After graduating from St. John’s University and teaching middle school Spanish, he made his career switch and landed his first FBI assignment in a taskforce investigating money laundering by South American and Mexican drug rings. Over the years, he held various investigative and supervisory positions in Puerto Rico, Miami and Washington before being appointed in 2010 to head the New York office’s criminal division.

At the time, the division was immersed in the groundbreaking investigation of Wall Streetmagnate Raj Rajaratnam and his multi-billion-dollar Galleon hedge fund. It marked the first time the bureau had turned to a method familiar in mob and drug cases — wiretaps — to capture conversations about insider trading. The wires sunk the talkative and boastful Rajaratnam, who’s serving an 11-year prison term.

Former Head of Boston’s FBI Office Fined for Violating Ethics Charge

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The former head of the FBI’s Boston office choked up Tuesday as he was fined $10,000 for violating an ethics charge, the Boston Globe reports.

Kenneth Kaiser, a retired assistant director of the FBI, had pleaded guilty as part of a plea agreement that spared him jail time.

“I lost something I valued the most — my reputation,” Kenneth W. Kaiser, 57, of Hopkinton, said.

Kaiser was accused of meeting with former FBI colleagues about his company that was under investigation.

Former Head of Boston’s FBI Office to Plead Guilty to Ethics Charge

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The former head of the FBI’s Boston office won’t serve any time in jail under a proposed deal with prosecutors that would require him to plead guilty, the Associated Press reports.

Kenneth Kaiser is expected to pleaded guilty to an ethics charge in return for a maximum punishment of a $15,000 fine.

The 57-year-old is accused of violating a federal ethics law by meeting with former FBI colleagues about his company that was under investigation, the AP wrote.

Kaiser served as special agent in charge of the office from 2003 to 2006 before leaving to become an assistant director at FBI headquarters.

Alex J. Turner named Assistant Director of FBI’s Security Division

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 Alex J. Turner was named assistant director of the FBI’s Security Division, which is responsible for ensuring a safe work environment for employees, the bureau announced Monday.

Turner began his career as a special agent with the FBI’s Atlanta Division in 1985, investigating drug and property crime.

In 1988, Turner moved to Atlanta, where he managed the Multi-Agency Gang Task Force. In 1993, Turner supervised the Atlanta Regional Drug Intelligence Squad.

Turner was assigned to assistant special agent in charge of the Washington office in 2000. Five years later, Turner managed the FBI’s violent gang, drug and major theft investigative programs.

Turner was appointed special agent in charge of the Norfolk  Division in 2008.

Turner earned a bachelor’s degree in criminology from the University of Maryland.

Hundreds of FBI Agents Investigating Arizona Shooting

Jared Loughner/pima county sheriff photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Days after the tragic shooting in Arizona, hundreds of FBI agents are tracing the steps of shooter Jared Loughner, trying to figure out motive, a timeline leading up to the incident and who he had been in contact with, NPR radio reports.

NPR reported that inside the bureau the investigation is known as a “bureau special”, which means agents from around the country are working the case.

The public radio station reported that Loughner isn’t talking.

“Usually in a case like this, agents will try to account for literally every day of a suspect’s life going back years,” Tom Fuentes, a former assistant director with the bureau told NPR. “Investigators will look for other possible associates, or any indication that someone might have talked Loughner into the attack. Even though it appears he was caught red-handed — in this case he was literally tackled at the scene — it helps the prosecution if there is a motive.”

Listen to NPR report