best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Attorney General

Former DOJ Officials Worry about Constitutional Crisis If Trump Removes Sessions

Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Former Justice Department officials are speaking out about President Trump’s incessant public battle with Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

They DOJ veterans are concerned Trump may fire Sessions without any accountability, The Hill reports

“There is a whole constitutional common law — the rules of the road — and it is vital,” said Harry Litman, a former U.S. attorney and deputy assistant attorney general. “It is based on examples of what people can and can’t do, but Trump shows every indication of disregarding it with impunity — and so far he has been able to. It’s kind of terrifying.” 

If Trump removes Sessions, would it create a constitutional crisis?

“I would hope so,” said Peter Zeidenberg, who spent 17 years as a DOJ prosecutor.

“That is the best-case scenario. The worst-case scenario is that Republicans in Congress shrug their shoulders. You would, in effect, have the president being permitted by Congress to quash an investigation simply because he doesn’t like it. I can’t imagine anything more serious than that.”

Syracuse.com: Mr. President, Don’t Fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions

President Trump, via White House

President Trump, via White House

By Editorial Board
Syracuse.com

President Donald Trump’s public criticism of his own attorney general, Jeff Sessions, is not merely Trump being Trump. It is part of a campaign to undermine the independence of the Justice Department and lay the groundwork for the president to fire Independent Counsel Robert Mueller, the man in charge of investigating Russia’s meddling in the presidential election.

Don’t do it, Mr. President.

Mueller must finish his investigation. Any attempt to short-circuit it will lead the American people to conclude you have something to hide, and are willing to use the power of your office to hide it. They will not abide a president who puts himself above the law. Even a Congress led by the president’s own party would have no choice but to act.

Let Mueller be Mueller, Mr. President.

Who is he? A decorated Marine veteran of Vietnam; FBI director under two presidents, a Republican and a Democrat; architect of the agency’s terror-fighting mission; the man a former Justice Department colleague describes as “utterly incorruptible” and “ramrod straight in his integrity.” This was how he was described upon taking the job and nothing since has occurred to taint that sparkling reputation.

The president, with scant evidence, accuses Mueller of having conflicts of interest – one of the few reasons an independent counsel can be dismissed. In an interview with the New York Times, Trump warned Mueller not to stray into his family’s business affairs, saying it would be crossing a “red line.” On the contrary, Mueller should follow the evidence wherever it leads. That is the obligation Mueller accepted and has apparently embraced in taking on the independent counsel role.

To read more click here. 

Trump Continues Attack on AG Sessions for Third Consecutive Day

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump continued his public attacks on Attorney General Jeff Sessions for a third consecutive day on Wednesday, this time for failing to fire the FBI’s acting director over his wife’s political connections to Hillary Clinton.

The criticism of Sessions’ handling of Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe has raised speculation that Trump is setting up the attorney general’s firing.

Trump has been fuming over Sessions’ decision to recuse himself from the Russia investigation, a decision that allowed the deputy AG to hire a special counsel to director the probe.

Some Republicans have come to Sessions’ defense, warning the president not to remove the attorney general.

Trump Considers Chasing Out AG Sessions As Russia Investigation Heats Up

Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his confirmation hearing in January.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his confirmation hearing in January.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The days may be numbered for Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

President Trump has met privately with his advisers to discuss replacing Sessions, and some officials close to Trump are suggesting possible replacements, the Washington Post reports. 

To some in Trump’s inner circle, firing Sessions would make it easier to fire special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, whose fate ultimately is determined by the attorney general.

But in Sessions’ case, the decision was made by Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein because Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation.

Trump has publicly berated Sessions’ for recusing himself. 

If Sessions quits, Trump could replace him with someone who would fire Mueller.

On Monday and Tuesday, Trump attacked Sessions on Twitter.

Giuliani Denies Report That Trump May Appoint Him to Replace Sessions

Rudolph Giuliani

Rudolph Giuliani

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump has mulled replacing Attorney General Jeff Sessions with longtime supporter Rudy Giuliani, Axios reported

But on Monday, the former New York City mayor told CNN the report was untrue and defended Sessions’ “right decision under the rules of the Justice Department” to recuse himself from the Russia investigation.

Numerous outlets reported this week that Trump is hoping Sessions will resign, in no small part because he recused himself from the Russia investigation.

Trump told the New York Times last week, “Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job and I would have picked somebody else.”

AG Sessions Hires Personal Attorney As Russia Investigation Heats Up

Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his confirmation hearing in January.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his confirmation hearing in January.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It was only a matter of time.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who failed to disclose meetings with a top Russian official during his confirmation hearing, has retained a personal attorney.

The Washington Post reports that Sessions’ new attorney is Washington lawyer Charles Cooper, a longtime friend in Washington. 

Also this week, Trump’s personal attorney hired a personal attorney for himself.

When Sessions testified last week before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Cooper was sitting behind the attorney general.

“I do represent the Attorney General, but, as with all clients, do not comment on confidential client matters,” Copper wrote in an email to the Post.

Cooper, a partner with Cooper & Kirk, declined to say why he was retained by Sessions, whose normally sharp memory gets fuzzy when asked about meeting with top Russian officials.

Justice Department spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores said Cooper is “the attorney general’s longtime friend and counsel.”

Cooper even assisted Sessions during his confirmation hearing in January.

Former AG Eric Holder Mulls Run for President in 2020 As He Fights Trump’s Agenda

Former AG Eric Holder

Former AG Eric Holder

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Outraged by the actions of Donald Trump, former Attorney General Eric Holder is leading the legal fight against the president and is even considering running for president in 2020.

“Up to now, I have been more behind-the-scenes,” Holder told Yahoo News in an exclusive interview about his plans. “But that’s about to change. I have a certain status as the former attorney general. A certain familiarity as the first African-American attorney general. There’s a justified perception that I’m close to President Obama. So I want to use whatever skills I have, whatever notoriety I have, to be effective in opposing things that are, at the end of the day, just bad for the country. 

“Now is the time to be more visible,” Holder added. “Now is the time to be heard.”

Holder traveled to California to speak in favor of legislation SB 54, also known as the California Values Act, which is designed to intervene in the Trump administration’s effort to force cash-strapped local police departments to help federal authorities deport undocumented immigrants.

Holder, who was one of President Obama’s closest friends and appointees, has been serving as outside counsel to the California legislature.

Holder said he attended Monday’s press conference “to dramatize there issue, to raise the consciousness of people, to help the legislation along.”

Sessions’ Explanation for Dodging Some Questions Raises Red Flags

AG Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday.

AG Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Attorney General Jeff Sessions often refused to answer questions from lawmakers on Tuesday, claiming that he does not have to disclose private deliberations involving the president.

But analysts are questioning whether Sessions’ use of executive privilege was appropriate and just an excuse to avoid answering tough questions.

For example, Sessions declined to say whether he was aware of the White House discussing future pardons if anyone in the Trump circle is charged with colluding with Russia to undermine the presidential election.

“You’re impeding this investigation by refusing to answer questions,” Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-New Mexico, told Sessions during the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing Tuesday. “I think your silence speaks volumes.”

Sessions acknowledged that Trump has not asserted executive privilege and that the attorney general has no authority to claim it.

“It’s my judgment that it would be inappropriate for me to answer and reveal private conversations with the president when he has not had a full opportunity to review the questions and to make a decision on whether or not to approve such an answer,” Sessions said.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Cornell Law School professor Jens David Ohlin said Sessions did not provide an adequate reason to refuse to answer questions. 

“His justification for refusing to answer the questions was completely incoherent. He claimed executive privilege but then denied that he had done so,” Ohlin said. “It made no sense whatsoever. He’s basically trying to have his cake and eat it, too: claim executive privilege but then pretend that he didn’t. His position has no basis in law, common sense, or logic.”