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Tag: attorney

Homeland Security Lawyer Sentenced to Month in Jail for Forging Document

justice-dept-photo-with-woman-and-courtBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Homeland Security lawyer who forged documents in a deportation case was sentenced to one month in prison.

Jonathan Love, a former assistant chief counsel, admitted he made a document appear that a Mexican man was ineligible for deportation relief, the ABA Journal reports. 

Love, 58, pleaded guilty to deprivation of rights under the color of the law.

Love said he has no idea why he doctored the document.

“Why did I do this? If I truly knew, I would not be standing here in front of you,” Love wrote in a letter to his sentencing magistrate judge. “It was stupid and unnecessary, and the consequences of my actions have tarnished my hard work and dedication to public service for the last 30 years.”

Other Stories of Interest

Four of Clinton’s Top Aides Using Same Attorney in Case of Private E-Mail Server

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Four of Hillary Clinton’s closet aides are using the same attorney to represent them in the case of the former secretary of state’s private e-mail server.

It’s an unusual legal strategy that suggests the aides are telling investigators the same story, Politico reports. 

The lawyer is Beth Wilkinson, a former assistant U.S. attorney who prosecuted Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

Legal experts said the unique strategy carries risks if the four aides end up with different interests.

The FBI plans to soon begin interview top Clinton aides, and the quartet may be among them.

“The premise of employing the same counsel is that they believe there is not likely to be a situation where they start pointing a finger at one another to save their own skins — or perhaps at Secretary Clinton,” said Dan Metcalfe, founding director of the DOJ’s office of information and privacy. “And there’s a sense that if one of them goes down, they all go down. It shows they think they can coordinate the defense to everyone’s benefit.”

FBI: Texas Topless Club Owner Put Hit on Arlington Mayor and Atty

News Report Questions FBI Theory That Anthrax Suspect Tried to Deceive Investigators

A U.S. Army scientist stands near the letters used in the 2001 anthrax attacks (Photo courtesy of FBI and ProPublica)

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

An investigative report published by ProPublica points to some flaws in the FBI’s conclusion that Ft. Detrick, Md. scientist Bruce Ivins was the culprit who mailed the deadly anthrax in 2001.

The investigation, conducted by ProPublica, PBS and McClatchy Newspapers, attempts to undercut a key theory that Ivins tried to deceive the FBI. The report points to samples Ivins provided from a flask in 2002 to the FBI. The FBI said tests failed to match the anthrax sent through the mail.

Later, the news report said, the FBI  took its own samples from the flask and found matches to the deadly anthrax letters.

Authorities pointed to that as a key piece of evidence against Ivins, saying he was intentionally being deceptive to hide his guilt. Ivins committed suicide in July 2008, just before he was about to be charged.

Rachel Lieber, the lead prosecutor in a case that will never go to trial, thinks that Ivins manipulated his sample to cover his tracks, the news report said.

“If you send something that is supposed to be from the murder weapon, but you send something that doesn’t match, that’s the ultimate act of deception,” the lead prosecutor Rachel Lieber said in the report. “That’s why it’s so important.”

But the news agencies report that they “turned up new evidence that challenges the FBI’s narrative of Ivins as a man with a guilty conscience who was desperately trying to avoid being discovered.”

“Records recently released under the Freedom of Information Act show that Ivins made available a total of four sets of samples from 2002 to 2004, double the number the FBI has disclosed,” the news report said. “And in subsequent FBI tests, three of the four sets ultimately tested positive for the” anthrax.’

The report suggested that the positive samples turned over to the FBI was proof that Ivins was not trying to deceive the FBI.

Paul Kemp, Ivins’ lawyer, said the existence of Ivins’ additional submissions discredits a key aspect of the FBI case, the report said.

“I wish I’d known that at the time,’’ he said.

The Justice Department has repeatedly dismissed any reports challenging its conclusion that Ivins was the culprit. The agency has said that the conclusion was based on multiple factors.

Read full report.

 

Fed Judge Explains Why He Gave Bernie Madoff 150 Years

Bernie Madoff

 
 
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A Manhattan federal  judge who sentenced swindler Bernie Madoff has told the New York Times that he weighed different factors before handing out a 150 year sentence.

Madoff’s lawyer  Ira Lee Sorkin had tried to convince U.S. District Judge Denny Chin,57, to give a far lesser sentence. He cited, according to the Times, Madoff’s move to tell his sons, knowing he’d be turned in. And he argued that Madoff, who was then 71, would live about 13 years. So he asked for 12 “just short of an effective life sentence.” The Times reported that Sorkin also proposed 15 to 20 years.

“It’s a fair argument that you want to give someone some possibility of seeing the light of day,” the judge told the Times, “so that they have some hope, and something to live for.”

He said he immediately rejected a 12 year sentence, but struggled with the idea of dishing out 20 to 25  years before ultimately concluding:

“In the end, I just thought he didn’t deserve it,” he told the Times. “The benefits of giving him hope were far outweighed by all of the other considerations.”

The Times also interviewed Madoff, who commented on the sentence.

“Explain to me who else has received a sentence like that,” Madoff said in a phone interview with the Times from prison in  North Carolina. “I mean, serial killers get a death sentence, but that’s virtually what he gave me.”

“I’m surprised Chin didn’t suggest stoning in the public square,” he added.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Big-Time Boston Lawyer Robert A. George Charged With Money Laundering

Atty. Robert A. George (right)/law firm photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethwire.com

A high-profile Boston attorney who has represented mobsters and some big name clients was charged Wednesday with money laundering that included taking payments from an undercover DEA agent posing as a drug dealer from the Dominican Republic.

Authorities charged that attorney Robert A. George, 56, of Westwood, Mass., helped conceal $225,000 in drug proceeds over a period of time.

According to a government  affidavit, a cooperating witness told George and a co-conspirator that he had large amounts of cash from drug trafficking.

Authorities alleged that  on two separate occasions, George’s co-conspirator took the cash from the government informant in exchange for a check made payable to a fictitious undercover company.  George’s co-conspirator then charged the government informant a substantial fee.

On another occasion, George allegedly took $25,000 in cash from an undercover DEA agent posing as a drug dealer client. George then made two separate deposits of that money, in amounts under $10,000 in order to avoid a reporting requirement, authorities said.

“Defense counsel play a critical role in the criminal justice system, protecting important constitutional rights upon which we all depend,” Boston U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said in a statement. “But when an attorney assists in the criminal concealment and laundering of drug money — as is alleged in this case — it impedes the administration of justice and is an affront to all ethical and law abiding members of the bar.”

” If convicted, Mr. George is no better than those who distribute illegal drugs,” Special Agent in Charge of the  Boston DEA, Steven Derr added.

Canadian Man Pays for Fleecing Edlerly Americans in Lottery Scam

money-photo
By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

A Canadian man promised the elderly a little piece of heaven. Instead, some lost their homes and life savings.

Today that man, Henry Anekwu, 43, of British Columbia, was sentenced in Los Angeles federal court to nine years in prison for fleecing dozens of elderly Americans of at least $600,000 in a lottery scam, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. He was also ordered to pay $510,840 in restitution.

During sentencing, Judge John F. Walter said Anekwu showed no remorse for his victims, who suffered “devastating consequences” of his scheme, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Authorities identified 79 victims.

The scam appeared to be a simple variation of the many overseas scams that promise millions of dollars in free money with the caveat that a tax or fee be paid up front.

To read more click here.

Ex-Ill. Gov. Rod Blago’s Trial Strategy Conflicts With Brother’s

Ex-Gov on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice

Ex-Gov on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

They may be brothers, but their attorneys seem to be mapping out conflicting strategies.

Robert Blogojevich, brother of ex-Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich, has filed a motion to keep FBI recordings from airing in their upcoming public corruption trial, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Brother Rod has indicated that he has nothing to hide and wants the jury to hear everything. They are charged with trading favors for campaign money and selling the Senate seat vacated by Barack Obama.

The Tribune reports that the attorney for Robert Blagojevich claims the FBI had no probable cause to make the recordings, and that there had been no indication that Robert traded favors for campaign contributions. Robert ran his brother’s campaign fund in 2008.

“Evidence of Robert Blagojevich soliciting campaign contributions on behalf of his brother, without proof of an explicit quid pro quo, is not remotely criminal, but, rather, exemplifies the American political process,” Robert’s attorney Michael Ettinger wrote, according to the Tribune.

To Read more click here.

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