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Tag: Bloods

Does FBI Gang Report Go Too Far When it Comes to Followers of Insane Clown Posse?

A Juggalo/facebookBy Allan Lengel

Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Did the FBI go over board a little in its recent 2011 National Gang Threat Assessment report?

Reporter Spencer Ackerman of WIRED seems to think so.

Ackerman writes that the FBI considers the teen fans of the “shticky rap group Insane Clown Posse to represent a threat on par with the Crips, Bloods, and Aryan Brotherhood.”

Apparently the fans of the Insane Clown Posse’s people — called Juggalos — paint their faces and have been known to cause mayhem at concerts. The rap group Insane Clown Posse is comprised of a duo from Detroit.

WIRED writes that the feds describe the group as loosely-organized hybrid gang” that are “forming more organized subsets and engaging in more gang-like criminal activity.”

WIRED writes that the FBI report says the Juggalo gang activity includes thefts, hand-to-hand drug sales and felony assaults.

“The FBI has recently had difficulty distinguishing ordinary American Muslims from terrorists; now it appears it has a similar problem distinguishing teenage fads from criminal conspiracies,” Ackerman writes.

Time magazine wrote a little piece on the matter and labeled it “Bizarre.”

 

Blood Gang Leader Admits to Murdering Teen in Case of Mistaken Identity

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

A leader of a Bloods street gang in New Jersey has admitted to the murder of an innocent teenager in a case of mistaken identity, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Newark.

Torien Brooks, the 30-year-old leader of the Fruit Town and Brick City Brims subgroups or chapters of the Bloods, also admitted Tuesday in federal court in Newark to kidnapping a rival gang member and conspiring to sell narcotics, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman said in a press release.

According to court documents, the murder took place on July 19, 2004 in Jersey City and involved Brooks and  co-defendant Emmanuel Jones, 27, of Jersey City, who went by the names “Killer,” “Killer E” and “Emo.” The documents say the two shot and killed who they thought to be responsible for an earlier shooting of a fellow gang member, but who was in fact an innocent teenager identified only as “M.T.” Three bystanders were hit by stray shots in the incident.

The kidnapping confession involves a rival gang member identified as “M.M.” According to ATF, Brooks said that he and fellow members Lary Mayo, 29, John Benning, 28, and Haleek State, 26 conspired to kidnap M.M. after a M.M. had changed gang sub-groups without permission.

The four kidnapped M.M. on April 11, 2005, pistol whipped him and took him to Patterson Falls, N.J., with the intent to kill him. M.M. was able to make a break and run to safety, according to court documents.

The narcotics confession involves a period in April 2007 and continuing for about a year in which Brooks and others conspired to smuggle heroin into Northern State Prison in Newark, where he was incarcerated. As part of the conspiracy, he and others in the Fruit Town and Brick City Brims gangs conspired to sell heroine on the streets of Paterson and have profits sent to his prison commissary account.

Brooks’ sentencing is set for Dec. 14. The racketeering count to which Brooks pleaded guilty carries a maximum penalty of life in prison and $250,000. Jones, Mayo and Benning await sentencing for similar charges.

 

Acting Head of N.Y. FBI Enjoyed the Wild Ride

Acting Head Venizelos at gang arrests in Newburgh, N.Y./fbi photo

Acting Head Venizelos at gang arrests in Newburgh, N.Y./fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

His title may be “acting,” but there’s no pretending that things haven’t been outright wild, abuzz, atwitter, downright explosive since George Venizelos took over in March on a temporary basis as head of the New York FBI office, the largest in the country.

There was the high-anxiety Times Square car bombing case. The Russian spy case. Key indictments of mobsters. And the roundup of 78 gang members from the Latin Kings and Bloods. And that’s just to name a few. In fact, since March, his agents have had a hand in the indictment of about 330 people.

“It all happened at once. It was definitely the experience of my life. It happened so fast,” he told AOL News. “Acting can be a thankless job, but acting in New York is still a tremendous responsibility.”

Monday, Venizelos loses the “acting” title and returns to his old role as special agent in charge of administration for the New York FBI Office. The permanent boss is arriving: Janice Fedarcyk, a friend of his who’s been running the Philadelphia FBI Office.

“For me personally it was exciting,” Venizelos, 50, said. “It seemed like every week something was happening. This was just kind of the perfect storm.”

To read more click here.

WEEKEND STORIES OF INTEREST

2 Cops Shot and Man Killed in Harlem Gunfight (NY Daily News)

About 500 N.Y. Feds, State and Local Cops Bust Up Bloods and Latin King Gangs in Small Town

About 500 FBI and other law enforcement officers gather get briefed before raids/fbi photo

About 500 FBI and other law enforcement officers gather to get briefed before raids/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

About 500 federal, state and local police on Thursday converged on the town of Newburgh, about 50 miles north of New York City, to round up gang members of the Bloods and the Latin Kings, who authorities say have been responsible for a good chunk of crime and drug trafficking in the city along the Hudson River.

Law enforcement agents and officers raided dozens of homes, and as of Thursday, 23 of 78 gang members named in federal indictments had been arrested. About 34 were already in custody, authorities said. Newburgh has a population of about 29,000.

FBI agent Jim Gagliano (left) briefs acting adic George Venizelos (right) /fbi photo

FBI agent Jim Gagliano (left) briefs acting adic George Venizelos (right) /fbi photo

“In a city as small as Newburgh and as violent—there have already been four homicides this year, all directly related to gang violence—these arrests will have a substantial effect on the crime rate in the city,” FBI special agent Jim Gagliano, who who headed a 16-month, FBI-led Safe Streets Task Force investigation said in a statement.

The FBI said the task force had made nearly 100 drug buys totaling more than five kilos of crack cocaine.

“The majority of these buys were done while we recorded video and audio,” Gagliano said. “Not only did we get the subject’s voice on tape, we also see the exchange.”

Baltimore Fed Lawsuit and Fed Bust Point to Some Grave Concerns About State Prison Guards’ Ties to Gangs

A federal lawsuit and a bust by the feds are shining some light on the links between prison guards and gangs in Maryland. It’s very unsettling.  Baltimore City Paper investigative reporter Van Smith takes an in depth look at the situation.

jail

By Van Smith
Baltimore City Paper
BALTIMORE — In 2008, 31-year-old prison inmate Tashma McFadden filed suit against 23-year-old correctional officer Antonia Allison.

On Oct. 9, that suit survived Allison’s attempt to have it dismissed. McFadden, who is seeking $800,000 in damages, claims Allison is a member of the Bloods gang and arranged for his stabbing and beating while in pre-trial detention in 2006 at the Baltimore City Detention Center (BCDC).

Court documents in the case reveal that since at least 2006, prison authorities have been aware that correctional officers in Baltimore’s prison facilities were suspected of being gang members or having gang ties.

The issue first emerged publicly in April, when 24 alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family (BGF) prison gang, including three correctional officers, were indicted in federal court (“Black-Booked,” Feature, Aug. 5 ). U.S. District Court Judge William Quarles is presiding over both the BGF criminal case and McFadden’s civil case.

For Full Story