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Tag: Border

Border Patrol Chief: Agents Are ‘Most Assaulted Law Enforcement Personnel’ in U.S.

border patrol 3By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Mark Morgan, the Border Patrol’s new chief, said his agents are “the most assaulted law enforcement personnel in the country.”

“I’ve learned that the United States Border Patrol agents are among the most assaulted law enforcement personnel in the country,” Mark Morgan, the new chief of the Border Patrol, told a House Homeland Security subcommittee panel on Tuesday, the Washington Examiner reports. “There have been 7,542 assaults against agents since 2006 and 30 agents have died in the line of duty since 2003.” 

Morgan also said agents are distracted from their mission to keep the country safe because of unaccompanied minors crossing the border.

“What we’re being asked to do right now, I think you could phrase it a little bit, is a humanitarian mission,” Morgan said.

Immigrants, Cartels Circumvent Border Walls by Digging Tunnels

Cross-border tunnel discovered by authorities this year.

Cross-border tunnel discovered by authorities this year.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border Patrol agents have found dozens of tunnels near the border of Mexico.

When agents locate the taste underground networks used by Mexican drug cartels, they dump concrete to seal the passageway and stamp them with a date, the New York Times reports. 

“The clock is ticking as soon as they complete a tunnel,” said Kevin Hecht, a Border Patrol tunneling expert. “They know that we will eventually find them. But if even one load gets through before we find it, they consider it a success.”

Many of the tunnels are used to circumvent large walls – like the one supported by Donald Trump.

“The Border Patrol has done an incredible job, given its resources,” said Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, the White House drug policy director in the Clinton administration. “But it would be a stretch to say that the border and border communities are secure when the agency lacks a high-confidence ability to detect cross-border tunnels. No wall is going to fix that.”

Trump has pledged to use sensor to  “find and dislocate tunnels and keep out criminal cartels,” but no such technology has proven successful.

Homeland Security Searches for Drones Capable of Facial Recognition

FBI-facial-recognitionBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Homeland Security is looking to Silicon Valley for specially designed drones.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that officials met last week with technology entrepreneurs in search of small, light-weight drones that are easy to fly and can cover vast stretches of desert.

The drones also need to be able to provide images good enough to scan faces against a database for prior criminal history.

“There can be questions about how accurate that is and legitimate questions about how someone’s picture got into a database,” said John Simpson, director of Consumer Watchdog’s privacy project.

Border Patrol currently uses drones, but the technology isn’t up to snuff, officials said.

Border Patrol Agents Find $600,000 Worth of Liquid Meth in Texas

These containers were filled with liquid meth.

These containers were filled with liquid meth.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border Patrol agents seized more than $600,000 worth of liquid methamphetamine in Eagle Pass, Texas, while conducting checkpoint operations.

San Angelo Live reports that canines alerted agents to possible narcotics in the vehicle.

“The profit from these narcotics are more important to the criminal organizations than the negative impact they have on communities,” said Acting Del Rio Sector Chief Matthew Hudak. “I commend our agents for their hard work and dedication in removing these drugs from our streets.”

The liquid meth was found in shampoo bottles.

The driver was arrested and turned over to the DEA.

Border Patrol Rescues Abandoned 2-Year-Old Girl Smuggled into U.S.

Border PatrolBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Smugglers left behind a 2-year-old girl in Granjeno, Texas, where she was wearing a T-shirt with a phone number on it.

Border Patrol agents rescued the girl and apprehended 14 illegal immigrants who authorities believe had possession of the girl, KSAT.com reports.

The girl was from El Salvador, and her mother said a friend was supposed to bring her daughter to her.

“Smugglers are heartless criminals who have no regard for the lives of the people, no matter what age. This child was left in the hands of strangers to get smuggled across the border,” said Chief Patrol Agent Manuel Padilla Jr. “This case shows how smugglers continue to prey on the most vulnerable, treating them as contraband, using them for personal gain.”

Other Stories of Interest

Authorities Discover Massive U.S.-Mexico Drug Tunnel, Seize 1 ton of Cocaine

Part of the tunnel.

Part of the tunnel.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Federal authorities discovered a massive drug-trafficking tunnel underneath the California-Mexico border, seizing one ton of cocaine and seven tons of marijuana and arresting six people.

“We believe this to be the longest tunnel that we have discovered in this district to date,” Laura Duffy, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of California, told ABC News.

The cocaine was worth about $22 million.

The 800-yard tunnel began at a house in Tijuana and ended in the Otay Mesa neighborhood of San Diego.

“On the surface, few would ever suspect that traffickers were moving multiton quantities of cocaine and marijuana worth tens of millions of dollars in such an unassuming way, through this rabbit hole in the ground, in full view of the world around it,” Duffy said.

FBI Investigates Border Patrol-Involved Shooting in South Central Arizona

border patrol 3By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating a shooting involving Border Patrol agents in south central Arizona.

The incident happened while agents were tracking suspected marijuana smugglers, KPBS reports. 

One agent fired a weapon after being assaulted with rocks.

Border Patrol’s Office of Professional Responsibility also is investigating.

The Border Patrol has been criticized for its use of force in recent years.

So far this fiscal year, Border Patrol agents used their weapons six times.

Records indicate that agents were assaulted nearly 180 times.

Other Stories of Interest

Arizona Republic: Border Walls Are for Suckers, Donald Trump

By Lndia Valdez
Arizona Republica

The news brings us two recent examples of why border walls don’t work. Can someone alert Donald Trump?

Exhibit A comes from the Border Patrol, which issued a press release April 6 asking people to be on the lookout for drones.

“The Yuma Sector Border Patrol has recently encountered small remote controlled aircraft, commonly referred to as drones, being used to smuggle drugs into the United States. The drones vary in size, but are commonly between 2 to 4 feet wide,” it says.

“Drones have been observed primarily in the San Luis area,” the press release continues. “They are known to carry illegal contraband into the U.S. where it is dropped and picked up by smugglers north of the border.”

They included a picture of a drone so everyone would know what to look for. No word on whether the drone in the picture was one captured at the border.

Here’s the rub: The Yuma Sector is the go-to place when border-hawk politicians want to point to a place where fencing has led to “operational control.”

Guess what? The smugglers figured out a way over.

Exhibit B in this tutorial on why walls don’t work comes from a widely viewed video showing would-be smugglers easily scaling a border fence – in full view of Border Patrol agents – then skedaddling back into Mexico when they realize they were being filmed, according to the Associated Press.

Border Patrol spokesman Mark Landess told AP it’s not uncommon for smugglers to scale the steel fence, especially around Nogales, which is a busy drug-smuggling corridor.

To read more click here. 

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