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Tag: Boston Marathon bombing

Defense for Boston Bombing Suspect Claim FBI Is ‘Needlessly Intrusive’ in Counsel’s Meetings with Client

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev are complaining that the FBI is getting in the way of legal counsel’s constitutional rights to meet with their client in private.

The Boston Globe reports that lawyers filed the complaints in court late Monday, saying FBI continues to be “needlessly intrusive.”

The lawyers said the FBI has ignored previous orders by U.S. District Court Judge George A. O’Toole Jr. to allow the counsel to meet with the suspect without being monitored.

“Defense counsel are thus more convinced than ever of the need for a reasonable degree of privacy and confidentiality for this series of legal visits and request that the court so order,” the lawyers argued.

Tsarnaev, who is now 20, is in federal prison awaiting trial on claims that he helped set off bombs on April 15, 2013, that killed three and injured more than 260 near the finish line of the Boston Globe.

Opinion: FBI Has Plenty of Questions to Answer About Its Repeated Failures Following Boston Marathon Attack

By The Rutland Herald
Editorial Board

As Boston marks the first anniversary of the Marathon bombings, one chapter closes. But there’s still enough to fill a book — especially when it comes to the role of the FBI.

Questions about it pour from the pages of numerous post-bombing government reports. An assessment by the House Homeland Security Committee challenges the FBI’s resistance to information sharing. A review done by various intelligence agencies highlights missed opportunities involving the threat posed by a radicalized Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Reports by a Florida prosecutor and the Department of Justice address the shooting death of Ibragim Todashev, who tied Tamerlan Tsarnaev to a triple homicide in Waltham, Mass., on Sept. 11, 2011. Unsurprisingly, both reports conclude that Todashev’s shooting by an FBI agent was justified. But why was Todashev questioned in his Orlando apartment, with access to items that could be used as weapons, rather than in a more secure environment?

Lawyers for Tamerlan’s brother, Dzhokhar, also claim the FBI sought to turn Tamerlan into an informant. The government said it has “no evidence” of that, which doesn’t exactly shut the door on the possibility.

Richard DesLauriers, the now retired FBI agent who was in charge of the Boston office and the Marathon investigation, went on “60 Minutes” to explain how the FBI identified the bombers. But the FBI has never told the public who interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev, nor explained why that agent failed to recognize the older brother from the surveillance video. So much for that old saying that a police officer never forgets a face. If this agent remembered Tamerlan’s face, it might have averted the public release of the video and the manhunt and violence that followed.

Inspector General: FBI Failed to Properly Assess Suspected Boston Marathon Bomber for Reported Extremism

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

If the FBI conducted a “more thorough assessment” of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the bureau may have been able to prevent the attack, according to an Inspector General report, The Los Angeles Times writes.

The report concludes the FBI should have done a better job handling Russian intelligence that suggested Tsarnaev was embracing Islamic extremism and could pose a threat.

The FBI investigated Tsarnaev based on a 2011 tip from Russia, but the bureau found links to terrorism.

Book Review: ”Long Mile Home,’ Recounts Boston Marathon Bombing Investigation

By Aamer Madhani
USA Today

On the first-year anniversary of a national tragedy, it’s inevitable for the so-called definitive account to be rolled out by publishers calculating that enough time has passed for an author to have developed perspective, but not so much time that the calamity is no longer fresh in the public’s conscience.

Publishing houses are, more often than not, wrong. Too often, readers, including this one, feel burned by investing time and cash in what too frequently reads like notebook dumps by journalists on the front line of a big story. The works ultimately don’t stand the test of time.

But with Long Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, The City’s Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for Justice, The Boston Globe‘s Scott Helman and Jenna Russell prove there are exceptions.

Long Mile Home, which arrives just ahead of the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings and the subsequent manhunt of Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is a riveting piece of journalism and an exceptional tribute to a great American city that manages to avoid being sentimental or syrupy.

Helman and Russell, two of the Globe‘s best reporters, relied heavily on their colleagues’ outstanding coverage of the bombing and the aftermath in weaving a narrative around several principal characters.

Attorneys: Boston Marathon Bomber Pushed to Spy on Chechen, Muslim Community for FBI

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The older of the accused Boston Marathon bombers was courted by the FBI to be an informant and keep an eye on the Chechen and Muslim community, according to lawyers for the younger alleged bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

The Boston Globe reports that the FBI pressured Tamerlan Tsarnaev to report on the communities, which may have “increased his paranoia and distress.”

“We seek this information based on our belief that these contacts were among the precipitating events for Tamerlan’s actions during the week of April 15, 2013, and thus material to the defense case in mitigation,” the lawyers said in their court filing.

“We base this on information from our client’s family and other sources that the FBI made more than one visit to talk with Anzor [his father], Zubeidat [his mother] and Tamerlan, questioned Tamerlan about his Internet searches, and asked him to be an informant, reporting on the Chechen and Muslim community.

“We do not suggest that these contacts are to be blamed and have no evidence to suggest that they were improper, but rather view them as an important part of the story of Tamerlan’s decline. Since Tamerlan is dead, the government is the source of corroboration that these visits did in fact occur and of what was said during them.”

The information was revealed in 23-page court filing, the Globe wrote.

Report About Deadly FBI Shooting of Ibragim Todashev in Orlando Leaves Out Information

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A long-awaited report on the FBI shooting of Ibragim Todashev revealed a lot of information but not the identity of the FBI agent who shot the Chechen man seven times.

The Orlando Sentinel reports that agent has remained anonymous and wouldn’t participate in an independent investigation by the state’s attorney.

Orange-Osceola State Attorney Jeff Ashton said his concern is about the objectivity of the probe.

“It would have been better if the FBI had brought in local law enforcement as the investigative agency,” Ashton said in an interview this week with the Orlando Sentinel. “When you have an agency investigating itself, there is a natural tendency to assume they’re going to cover. And even if that’s not the case, it’s just better to have an independent investigation.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Report on FBI’s Shooting of Ibragim Todashev Draws Critics, More Questions

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Not everyone is satisfied with how the FBI handled Ibragim Todashev, a Chechen man who had ties to one of the Boston Marathon bombing shooters and was killed by an agent during an alleged confession.

The Christian Science Monitor reports that state prosecutor Jeffrey Ashton and others, including civil rights groups, have some qualms with the FBI’s handling of the affair.

Boston Herald columnist Peter Gelzinis said the 161-page report on Todashev’s death was a “whitewash,” adding, “Once again the FBI waltzes away from a mess. No harm, no foul.”

The account of Todashev’s death was finally released this week after a 10-month hold during which the FBI blocked access to the medical examiner’s report, CSM reported.

“The central question of whether the killing of Mr. Todashev was justified remains frustratingly unanswered,” Baylor Johnson, an American Civil Liberties Union spokesman, told NPR after the report was released Tuesday.

Autopsy Shows FBI Shot Chechen Man Ibragim Todashev 7 Times During Interrogation

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

An FBI agent interviewing Ibragim Todashev shot the Chechen man six times in the body and once in the head after a sudden altercation in his Florida apartment, ABC News reports, citing an autopsy report.

The 27-year-old, who was an associate of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was being questioned about an unsolved 2011 triple murder in Massachusetts.

After implicating himself, Todashev crashed a coffee table into the back of the head of an FBI agent and came at officers with a long object, according to the findings by Florida State Attorney General Jeffrey Ashton.

The agent responded by opening fire.

The report said there’s “no evidence of close range firing in any of the gunshot wounds.”

To read the autopsy click here.