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Tag: CBS

CBS Close to Deal to Adapt Former FBI Director Comey’s Book into Miniseries

Former FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Former FBI Director James Comey’s memoir may soon be the basis for a miniseries.

Deadline Hollywood reports that CBS is close to inking a deal for a miniseries based on the best-selling book, “A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership. 

CBS won an auction for rights to pitch the project, and Comey has been involved in discussions over the proposed miniseries.

Billy Ray, an Academy Award-nominated screenwriter for the 2013 film “Captain Phillips,” is expected to write the adaptation.

A New FBI Show Is Coming to Prime-Time TV This Season on CBS

By Alan Stamm
ticklethewire.com

Josh Dunhamel is no Efrem Zimbalist Jr., and his new TV show is unlike “The F.B.I.”

The 2014 version is “Battle Creek,” a drama-comedy set in that Michigan city and picked up by CBS for at least 13 episodes. No date is announced for its “coming soon” mid-season debut.

Dunhamel plays Special Agent Milt Chamberlain, sent to open a field office in the economically depressed Midwestern city of 52,000.

“It’s a throwback old-school cop show,” Dunhamel tells Lauren Moraski of CBS News. “I play an FBI agent who’s setting up a satellite office in Battle Creek.

“We work together with some of the local detectives in this underfunded run-down department. So my character has all the resources in the world and this poor police department has almost nothing. So it’s a contrast between local law enforcement and the FBI. It’s funny, but it’s also a serious procedural at the same time.”

His main co-star is Dean Winters as local Det. Russ Agnew. They spar as a mismatched pair, much as Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy do in “The Heat,” a 2013 comedy film. And as Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy do in “48Hrs.” (1982) and its 1990 sequel. Similarly, Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell played “Tango & Cash” on the big screen in 1969. Hey, no one pitches this as a breakthrough concept.

Here’s how CBS promotes the new series, shot in Los Angeles:

“As Russ and Milt work long hours together, the question is: Will it be Milt’s charm and endless supply of high-end resources or Russ’ old-fashioned cynicism, guilt and deception that prove to be the keys to catching the bad guys in his beloved hometown?

The executive producer is Vince Gilligan, who produced “Breaking Bad,” which goes a long way toward explaining why USAToday this summer called it “one of next season’s most-anticipated new series.”

Gilligan says he’s “never actually been to Battle Creek,” but likes the name and will portray it as “a city of underdogs.”

 

Here’s a partial list of some of other FBI shows

  • “The F.B.I.,” 1965-74:  Insp. Lewis Erskine (Zimbalist) and several agents handled cases based on real FBI files. Erskine reported to Arthur Ward (Phillip Abbott), assistant to the director. The technical adviser was W. Mark Felt, an associate director of the bureau later unmasked as Watergate informant “Deep Throat.” It ran for 241 episodes.
  • “Mancuso, F.B.I.” 1989-90:  Robert Loggia starred on NBC as Nick Mancuso, a bureau veteran assigned to headquarters, where superiors saw him as a maverick with little regard for agency rules and procedures. Low ratings limited it to one season and prime-time summer reruns in 1993.
  • “The FBI Files,” 1998-2006: This 120-episode documentary series ran on the Discovery Channel cable network, using reenactments and interviews with agents and forensic scientists to dramatize real cases.

A New FBI Show Is Coming to Prime-Time TV This Season on CBS

By Alan Stamm
ticklethewire.com

Josh Dunhamel is no Efrem Zimbalist Jr., and his new TV show is unlike “The F.B.I.” But another show starring an FBI agent is coming to TV.  

The 2014 version is “Battle Creek,” a drama-comedy set in that Michigan city and picked up by CBS for at least 13 episodes. No date is announced for its “coming soon” mid-season debut.

Dunhamel plays Special Agent Milt Chamberlain, sent to open a field office in the economically depressed Midwestern city of 52,000.

“It’s a throwback old-school cop show,” Dunhamel tells Lauren Moraski of CBS News. “I play an FBI agent who’s setting up a satellite office in Battle Creek.

“We work together with some of the local detectives in this underfunded run-down department. So my character has all the resources in the world and this poor police department has almost nothing. So it’s a contrast between local law enforcement and the FBI. It’s funny, but it’s also a serious procedural at the same time.”

His main co-star is Dean Winters as local Det. Russ Agnew. They spar as a mismatched pair, much as Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy do in “The Heat,” a 2013 comedy film. And as Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy do in “48Hrs.” (1982) and its 1990 sequel. Similarly, Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell played “Tango & Cash” on the big screen in 1969. Hey, no one pitches this as a breakthrough concept.

Here’s how CBS promotes the new series, shot in Los Angeles:

“As Russ and Milt work long hours together, the question is: Will it be Milt’s charm and endless supply of high-end resources or Russ’ old-fashioned cynicism, guilt and deception that prove to be the keys to catching the bad guys in his beloved hometown?

The executive producer is Vince Gilligan, who produced “Breaking Bad,” which goes a long way toward explaining why USAToday this summer called it “one of next season’s most-anticipated new series.”

Gilligan says he’s “never actually been to Battle Creek,” but likes the name and will portray it as “a city of underdogs.”

 

Here’s a partial list of earlier FBI shows:

  • “The F.B.I.,” 1965-74:  Insp. Lewis Erskine (Zimbalist) and several agents handled cases based on real FBI files. Erskine reported to Arthur Ward (Phillip Abbott), assistant to the director. The technical adviser was W. Mark Felt, an associate director of the bureau later unmasked as Watergate informant “Deep Throat.” It ran for 241 episodes.
  • “Mancuso, F.B.I.” 1989-90:  Robert Loggia starred on NBC as Nick Mancuso, a bureau veteran assigned to headquarters, where superiors saw him as a maverick with little regard for agency rules and procedures. Low ratings limited it to one season and prime-time summer reruns in 1993.
  • “The FBI Files,” 1998-2006: This 120-episode documentary series ran on the Discovery Channel cable network, using reenactments and interviews with agents and forensic scientists to dramatize real cases.

Could the Secret Service Scandal be Bigger?


Sen. Grassley/official photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Just when it looked as if the Secret Service might be able to wrap up its prostitution mess sooner than later.

CBS is reporting that authorities were looking into the possibility that Secret Service agents may have paid for hookers and strippers in El Salvador while being part of an advance team for the President in March 2011.

“This latest allegation only reaffirms the need for independent investigations by the Inspector General,” Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Ia.) said in a statement issued Thursday.

“Regardless of whether the incidents were previously referred to internal investigators, they need to be examined. There are rumors flying about various incidents over several years about the conduct of Secret Service personnel, as well as other law enforcement and military personnel in locations around the world. The only way to put to rest the rumors of a much wider problem is for the allegations to receive transparent and independent reviews.”

Sen. Schumer Wants Justice Dept. to Review “Stand Your Ground” Laws

Alum Sen. Charles Schumer

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The shooting of Trayvon Martin is prompting some folks to push for changes in the “Stand Your Ground” laws around the nation that allow people to use force if they think their lives or others are in danger.

The New York Post reports that Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation” that he wants the Justice Department to review the law.

“This ‘Stand Your Ground’ law is a whole new concept in our jurisprudence. It basically says, if you fear great physical harm, you can shoot,” said Schumer, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee. “Some people call it ‘Shoot first; ask questions later,'” he added.

To read more click here.

Top Ten List About Paranoia: FBI Investigating Radical Muslim’s Death Threats Against David Letterman

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

If talk show host David Letterman were to put out a “Top 10 List” of reasons to be paranoid, this would be at the top.

The FBI has said it will investigate a death threat made by a radical Muslim, the International Business Times reports.

The radical person called for Letterman’s tongue to be cut out and his neck broken for mocking former al Qaeda leader and former senior al-Qaeda member Ilyas Kashmiri, the publication reported.

“So [al Qaeda] picked a successor to Osama bin Laden, and his name was Ilyas Kashmiri,” Letterman said during his opening monologue on June 8. “Well, guess what: He was blown up by an American drone.”

The International Business Times  reported that “Omar from Basra, Iraq”  posted on the al Qaeda online forum Shumoukh al-Islam: “We pray to Allah to paralyze his tongue, and that the righteous believers will break his neck.”

The International Business Times reported that CBS and Letterman declined comment and that New York police notified CBS and local police wher Letterman lives.

New FBI Show on CBS Needs Fresher Feel, NY Critic Says

CBS's new drama about an elite team of agents in the FBI's Behavioral Analysis Unit

By David Hinckley
New York Daily News

This spinoff from “Criminal Minds” illustrates the danger of a television network getting too good at something.

CBS has done so well with “police procedurals” – shows that set up a crime and walk the viewer through to its solution – that the network seems to think we viewers will just keep watching more of them forever.

At a certain point, though, we need something fresher than “Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior” is providing.

The show scores up front with two A-list actors: Forest Whitaker as lead FBI agent Sam Cooper, and Janeane Garofalo as Beth Griffith, a fellow agent who among other things keeps Sam from becoming a loose cannon.

To read more click here. (The Show Airs Wednesday at 9 p.m. on CBS)

FBI Files Show CBS’s Walter Cronkite Collaborated With Anti-War Protesters

Walter Cronkite/asu photo

Walter Cronkite/asu photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

No surprise that the FBI kept files on Walter Cronkite, one of America’s most influential newsmen.

Yahoo! News reported that it obtained FBI files through the Freedom of Information Act that show “Cronkite allegedly collaborated with anti-Vietnam War activists in the 1960s, going so far as to offer advice on how to raise the public profile of protests and even pledging CBS News resources to help pull off events.”

The documents said Cronkite encouraged Florida college students to invite Sen. Edmund Muskie to speak at a protest in 1969. The document said that Cronkite told the students that Muskie would be nearby for a fundraiser and that CBS would fly Muskie by helicopter to and from the rally, Yahoo! reported.

Cronkite died last year at age 92.

To read full story click here.