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Tag: Chad Joy

Some Dispute FBI Agent’s Allegations of Government Misconduct in Sen. Stevens Case

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens before his defeat
Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens before his defeat

It’s hard to figure out what was more interesting: the trial or the post-trial with even juicier allegations of government wrongdoing.


By RICHARD MAUER and LISA DEMER
Anchorage Daily News

As the Justice Department prepares its official response to the FBI whistle-blower complaint that surfaced in the case of former U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens, people with first-hand knowledge of some of its issues, including some named in the complaint, say it represents overblown concerns of an inexperienced agent.
The unusual complaint was brought by FBI agent Chad Joy, one of the key investigators in the five-year-old federal inquiry into corruption in Alaska politics. He accused the lead agent in the broad investigation and several prosecutors in the Stevens case of wrongdoing.
One former confidential source in the corruption investigation took issue with some of the facts alleged in the complaint by Joy. The source, Frank Prewitt, a former state corrections commissioner, said in an interview recently that he never observed FBI case agent Mary Beth Kepner, the chief target of the complaint, cross the line into improper or unethical conduct.
For Full Story

Read Latest Gov. Motion That Includes Info on the Replacement of Prosecution Team  Filed 2-16-09

Judge Changes Mind: Atty. Gen. Mukasey Won’t Have To Give Sworn Statement In Messy Stevens Case

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens

Atty. Gen. Mukasey got a reprieve from the a federal judge. Still, the Sen. Stevens case is not looking good for the governor. It’s hard to believe the judge won’t at least call for a new trial.

By The Anchorage Daily News
WASHINGTON — The judge in Ted Stevens’ false-disclosure case reversed himself Wednesday and said neither the attorney general nor any other top level Justice Department official would be required to give a sworn statement about an Anchorage FBI agent’s whistle-blower complaint.
Instead, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan ordered in Washington that the Justice Department’s Public Integrity Section provide him and Stevens’ lawyers with all its communications related to the agent’s complaint. The material, due Jan. 29, will be filed under seal, Sullivan ruled, preventing public disclosure.
The FBI complaint, by agent Chad Joy, has clouded Stevens’ conviction on seven counts of failing to disclose gifts and services over six years. Joy alleged that the public corruption investigation in Alaska was tainted by another agent’s improper source handling, and that prosecutors in Stevens’ trial knowingly withheld evidence that Stevens was entitled to see.
For Full Story

Oooops! Another Government Screw Up in Stevens Case: Prosecution Says it Misspoke and Asks Judge Not to Force Atty. Gen. To Sign Declaration Under Oath

The government now says it misspoke when it told the judge on Wednesday that an FBI agent in the Stevens case had been denied whistleblower status. The misstep on Wednesday set off the judge who ordered  Atty. Gen. Michael Mukasey to sign a declaration of oath on the matter. Now the prosecution says it was all a misunderstanding. Ooops.

By Lisa Demer and Erika Bolstad
Anchorage Daily News

On Wednesday, federal prosecutors revealed that Anchorage FBI agent Chad Joy was the person alleging misconduct in the Ted Stevens corruption investigation and also said he had been “denied whistleblower status.”
Today, they told the judge they were wrong on the second point.
A document filed late in the day today describes another misstep for the prosecution in the case of former U.S. Sen. Stevens, convicted last year of seven felonies for failing to reveal gifts on federal financial disclosure forms.
At Wednesday’s hearing, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan was angered when prosecutors told him that Joy didn’t qualify for whistleblower status. Had he known that earlier, the judge said, he would have handled the complaint differently from the start, he said. In December, when the complaint came to light, he ordered that a redacted copy with almost no names be released.
“I want to know what your office knew and when,” Sullivan demanded at the hearing. He ordered that Attorney General Michael Mukasey sign a declaration under oath about who knew what when about the whistleblower status. But on Thursday, prosecutors admitted they got that part wrong and are asking that the judge back off his order for Mukasey to get involved.
For Full Story
Read Government Motion
UPDATE: Friday 6:40 P.M. Annoyed Judge Still Wants Answers From  Mukasey (Anchorage Daily News)

More Details of Allegations of FBI Misconduct Come Out in Stevens Case

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens/official photo

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens/official photo

The case is only getting uglier. Whether the prosecution can survive all the allegations and maintain the conviction is a big question mark.  At minimum, a new trial could be in the making. But who knows.

By ERIKA BOLSTAD
Anchorage Daily News
WASHINGTON — One of the FBI agents assigned to investigate corruption in Alaska politics has accused the lead agent in the probe of unethical behavior, including leaking information about the inner workings of the agency to outsiders and seeking a job for her husband from people who were sources that led to the conviction in October of U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens.
The allegations against FBI Special Agent Mary Beth Kepner were first introduced last month, when Special Agent Chad Joy’s whistleblower complaint surfaced as part of Stevens’ appeal. Until Wednesday, however, much of Joy’s complaint was blacked out, leaving people to speculate about the identity of the whistleblower and the Justice Department co-workers he had accused of wrongdoing.
Joy also remained unnamed until Wednesday, when U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan held a court hearing to decide whether to allow the public to see additional blacked-out sections of the eight-page document. Joy, who began working for the FBI in 2003, was assigned to the public corruption probe soon after arriving at the Anchorage office in January 2004.
In his complaint, Joy largely focuses on Kepner’s relationship with her sources in the investigation. One of those sources, which is still redacted, “gave Kepner’s husband his current job as a security guard at the Port of Anchorage,” Joy wrote. Joy also accuses her of accepting artwork of her dog painted by the wife of another source, also unnamed, as well as house-hunting help when she moved from Juneau to Anchorage.
For Full Story

Read Latest Version of FBI Agent’s Allegations