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Tag: deportation

ICE Raids Spike in Alabama As Agents Detain Undocumented Immigrants without Criminal Records

ICE agents, via ICE.

ICE agents, via ICE.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Since President Trump was elected, ICE agents have been conducting raids and detaining undocumented immigrants in Alabama at a rate higher than anywhere else in the Deep South, AL.com reports. 

Among those detained are undocumented immigrants with no criminal records.

During targeted raids, ICE agents are detaining anyone they encounter without documentation.

“It’s blown up over the past two weeks,” Baton Rouge, La., defense attorney Paul “Woody” Scott, said. “We can’t even attend our phones because so many people are calling with these kinds of detentions.”

ICE officials declined to give state-by-state breakdowns of detainments.

“ICE conducts targeted immigration enforcement in compliance with federal law and agency policy,” Thomas Byrd, a spokesman for ICE’s New Orleans field office, wrote. “ICE does not conduct sweeps or raids that target aliens indiscriminately.”

President Trump’s Immigration Plans Remain Murky Despite Rhetoric

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Immigrants nationwide are waiting anxiously to see how President Trump handles immigration enforcement after his rhetoric suggested a hardline approach.

What remains unclear is whether recent raids mark a departure from Obama administration’s policies, Newsday reports. 

President Obama wasn’t exactly weak on immigration. In fact, his administration deported an estimated 2.5 million immigrants, more than his predecessors.

On Feb. 12, Trump tweeted, ““The crackdown on illegal criminals is merely the keeping of my campaign promise. Gang members, drug dealers & others are being removed!”

“The Border Patrol has traditionally picked up people and created a climate of fear for even those who have papers,” Meghan Maloney of the New York Immigration Project told the Buffalo News. “In this current climate, that fear is much more palpable.”

But the conservative National Review suggested last week that the deportation policies so far are “nothing new.”

“Illegal immigrants in the United States have long dealt with the fear that ICE officers would be knocking at their door,” it said. “In fiscal year 2012, for example, ICE removed over 400,000 illegal aliens, a number that was high enough to prompt frenzied anti-deportation rhetoric.”

Homeland Security Council Criticizes Private Detention Facilities for Immigrants

jail2photoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An advisory council to Homeland Security criticized a report Thursday that suggested privately run detention facilities may be the only way to house the surging numbers of immigrants facing deportations.

More than three-quarters of the Homeland Security Advisory Council rejected a key section of the report that state the “reliance on private prisons should, or inevitably must, continue,” US News reports.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson formed a six-member subcommittee to write the report.

The Homeland Security Advisory Council upheld sections of the report that demanded more oversight and monitoring of immigration detention facility.

Other Stories of Interest

Border Patrol Spends $300,000 a Day Deporting Undocumented Immigrants by Plane

A Gulfstream IV jet like this was used numerous times to send immigrants home.

A Gulfstream IV jet like this was used numerous times to send immigrants home.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border officials are deporting illegal immigrants on commercial flights and private jets at a cost to taxpayers of more than $300,000 a day.

The Daily Mail reports that Immigration and Customs Enforcement spent $116 million in 2015 to deport 235,413 back to their home countries.

About 40% of the deported immigrants were convicted criminals. Another 1,000 were identified as gang members.

The average cost to deport an immigrant by plane was $12,213 in 2015.

Included in that cost are identifying the immigrants, apprehending them, lodging them in a detention center, putting them through immigration court and then removing them.

Other Stories of Interest

Homeland Security Readies for Raid to Deport Hundreds of Central American Families

homeland2department-of-homeland-security-logo-300x300By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Homeland Security is preparing for a series of raids that involve deporting hundred of families who fled to the United States since the beginning of 2014, the Washington Post reports. 

As early as January, ICE agents will embark on its first large-scale deportation of families who came from violence-torn Central America.

The deportation targets adults and children who already have been ordered removed from the U.S. by an immigration judge.

At least hundreds of immigrants will be targeted.

“It would be an outrage if the administration subjected Central American families to even more aggressive enforcement tactics,” said Gregory Chen, director of advocacy for the American Immigration Lawyers Association. “This administration has never acknowledged the truth: that these families are refugees seeking asylum who should be given humanitarian protection rather than being detained or rounded up. When other countries are welcoming far more refugees, the U.S. should be ashamed for using jails and even contemplating large-scale deportation tactics.”

Saudi Arabian Man to Be Deported After Pleading Guilty to Punching TSA Officer

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Saudi Arabian man will be deported after pleading guilty this week to punching a TSA officer in the face at the Orlando International Airport in January.

Mohammed Abdullah Alomaim, 43, was sentenced to time served and a two-year supervised release, The Orlando Sentinel reports.

“As a result of his conviction, Alomaim will be deported from the United States,” a statement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida said.

In January, a TSA officer approached Alomaim for acting erratically and leaving his bag unattended. Alomaim responded by punching the officer in the face.

“Alomaim was immediately taken into custody,” the statement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

The FBI handled the investigation.

Other Stories of Interest


Opinion: U.S. Should Be More Careful About Deporting Central American Immigrants

istock photo

By Alan Gomez
USA Today

For the past few weeks, the attention of the White House and Congress has, rightfully, been on the tens of thousands of children from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador flooding across the U.S. border.

But as Washington debates the fastest and safest way to send those kids back home, it gives us a chance to rethink the way we’re deporting people to Mexico, too.

Border Patrol agents have wide latitude to determine where and when they deport someone caught trying to cross the border illegally. In many instances, they deport the person far from the location where they were caught — that hinders their ability to try to cross again, given they’re in an unfamiliar city and don’t have local connections to help.

But little thought has been given to their deportation destination, and data from both sides of the border indicate the government is sending people into some incredibly dangerous terrain.

Take Tijuana, for example. That area was once one of the most violent along the border, with drug cartels fighting a bloody battle for control of the region. But from 2008 to 2012, the city’s murder rate fell from 41 per 100,000 residents to 21,according to a study by the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute.

To read more click here.

Justice Department Wants to Slow Pace of Deportations by Focusing on Immigrants with Violent Histories

Jeh Johnson

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

City and county jails are increasingly rejecting federal requests to hold immigrants who are in the country illegally.

Now the Justice Department plans to do something about it – reduce deportation mainly to immigrants who have committed violent crimes, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is expected to make his case before the Security Communities.

The move is controversial because it would reduce the number of deportations.

Supporters say the initiative would allow local police to handle their own crimes and for more humane treatment of immigrants.

Republicans oppose any changes to Secure Communities without an overhaul of the immigration law, the Los Angeles Times wrote.

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