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Tag: doctor

Special FBI Agent’s Brush with Death Doesn’t Slow Her Down


By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An 11-year veteran of the FBI, Special Agent Diane Wehner believed she was in good physical shape.

After all, she worked out daily at the gym at the FBI’s Charlotte Field Office and passed her required annual fit tests.

But after completing the fit test in September 2015, the 36-year-old said she “didn’t feel very well. My neck hurt, my back hurt,” she told the Charlotte Observer. 

Just when she thought she was beginning to feel better, she began to slur her speech.

“When we first met Diane, she was in the middle of having a stroke and with strokes, time is very important,” said Dr. Joe Bernard, an Endovascular Neuro Surgeon at Carolinas Medical Center where Wehner was eventually airlifted.

Likely from doing sit-ups during the fit test, Wehner dissected both parties in her neck.

The doctor wasted no time and operated to remove the clot before it was too late.

“Sometimes we have hours to be able to do this. Sometimes we just have minutes,” Dr. Bernad said.

After her near brush with death, Wehner returned to the FBI, focusing on counterintelligence, white-collar crime and terrorism.

Dr. Bernard said Wehner is alive today because she didn’t hesitate to go to the hospital.

“Diane’s unusual because most strokes happen in older patients, but part of the awareness that needs to be broadcast is strokes can happen to anybody,” Dr. Bernard said.

Georgia Psychiatrist Raided After Allegedly Running Pill Mill Tied to 36 Deaths

Writing prescriptionBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Georgia psychiatrist accused of running a pill mill that allegedly led to the deaths of 36 patients was arrested during a DEA raid, UPI reports. 

Dr. Narendra Nagareddy is accused of violating the state’s Controlled Substances Act by overprescribing potentially dangerous medications.

“He’s a psychiatrist in Jonesboro who has been overprescribing opiates and benzodiazepine and the last several years has had a multitude of overdose deaths.” Clayton County Police Chief Mike Register told WSB-TV.

His office and home were raided by local and federal authorities in Jonesboro, Ga.

“Former and current patients have admitted to obtaining controlled substance prescriptions from Dr. Nagareddy without having a legitimate medical need,” court records show.

Other Stories of Interest

Federal Crackdown on Pain Meds Turning Legitimate Patients into Victims

pain medsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Patients with a legitimate need for pain medication are having a hard time getting their drugs because of a crackdown on opioid addiction, Al Jazeera reports. 

Since the 2013 crackdown began, more pharmacists are refusing to fill valid prescriptions for controlled substances, even to people with a legitimate need.

“But federal drug policy has done the most damage. For the past five years, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has been orchestrating a high-stakes proxy war between physicians and pharmacists, creating tens of thousands of so-called ‘opioid refugees’ in the process,” Al Jazeera wrote.

Among those hardest hit are poor, minority and elderly people who have a legitimate need for pain meds.

Al Jazeera called it the “equivalent of medical redlining.”

An Analysis: The Illicit Prescription Drug Epidemic Just Keeps Getting Worse

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office. He is the author of the book “Carving Out the Rule of Law: The History of the United States Attorney’s Office in Eastern Michigan 1815–2008″.

Ross Parker

 
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com
 
The following are a few of the true stories from the cinema verite of America’s Prescription Addiction already playing in real life near you. Half of Americans received at least one prescription in the last month, and almost three billion prescriptions for 100 billion pills were dispensed last year. Both numbers are on a steady increase.

Scene #1 – In the early morning hours the “patients” are lined up out the door and around the block of the suburban Detroit clinic.  Each has a well rehearsed set of subjective symptoms that will produce a scrip for Xanax, Vicodin or another drug that they can sell on the street. Muted cheers as the doctor pulls up in his expensive European sedan, gives them a friendly wave, and then enters the side door of the office. By noon he will have completed his “treatment” of those in the line, and he will retire to the doctors’ lounge at a nearby hospital where he can check his stocks on his laptop.

Scene #2 – The federal prosecutor and case agent view the latest day’s video of a court-authorized Title III from a camera inserted into another doctor’s office, this time in the inner city. The investigation had shown that no “patients” ever entered this office. The doctor enters the office and, using the list of names and drugs given to him by his assistant, proceeds to write out dozens of prescriptions for patients he never sees. What is striking to the prosecution team is that he always puts on his starched white coat and checks his appearance in the mirror before sitting at his desk to complete his task.

Scene #3 – Fourteen year old Sally digs through her parents’ medicine cabinet before leaving the house to join her friends. She thought there was some Valium left from last week but decides to settle for a few of these OxyContins her father had left over from some back surgery. A friend would bring some alcohol to share with the group. Her parents would receive a call later that night from the hospital emergency room where she had been taken after she went into seizure at the party.

Scene #4 – Max was a good student at the state university, but this semester’s course load was a ball-buster, and his performance on final exams next week would determine whether he would keep his scholarship for the rest of the year. Fortunately he had a buddy down the hall who had been diagnosed as ADHD and who would always slide him a few Adderall to boost his concentration level.

Scene #5 – Dr. Anderson gets a call as he is leaving the house with his family to see a Friday night movie. He has to take it because it is his turn to be on call. A desperate sounding patient of the clinic where he works is in a great deal of pain from a recent surgery. She needs a prescription for a pain killer called in to the pharmacy so that she can get through the weekend. Although he knows it will mess up the movie schedule, the doctor takes the time to check the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program database and discovers that the patient has been getting the same pain pills from two other physicians and an emergency room in the last month. He refuses the request and makes a mental note to address the issue with her regular physician.

Like most things, along with the use comes the abuse. Over one-fifth of Americans have taken prescription drugs for non-medical reasons. One-quarter of high school students have abused them, a 33% increase in the last four years. Six of the ten most popular illegal drugs used by 12th graders were originally obtained by prescription, and half of them came from mom and dad’s medicine cabinet.

The epidemic of illicit prescription drug abuse continues to gain speed.  Its use exceeds the combined use of cocaine, heroin, and all inhalants. Marijuana is the only illegal drug used more than pharmaceuticals.

Drug overdose deaths exceeded automobile accident fatalities last year, and most of these (about 24,000) involved prescription drugs, especially addictive painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin.

Read more »

DEA Agents Find Crack-Smoking Doctor in Filthy House

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

DEA agents are used to low-life criminals.

But during a raid this week in a New York house riddled with needles and crack, agents found Dr. Daniel Gillick, a 62-year-old emergency room doctor, lighting up a crack pipe with a young female companion, Buffalo News reports.

Gillick’s status as a doctor prompted the U.S. Attorney’s Office to speed up the case.

“This is a public safety concern,” Dale M. Kasprzyk, agent in charge of the regional DEA office, told the Buffalo News. “We wanted to cut off any possible access to hospitals, prescriptions and prescription drugs as soon as possible. … We want to make sure this doctor was using good judgment and was using proper medical procedures in treating his patients.”

Gillick was appeared in court Wednesday on a charge of crack cocaine possession, the Buffalo News reported.

STORIES OF OTHER INTERESTS

Outspoken Ex-FBI Agent Colleen Rowley Says FBI Could Have Done More to Try and Stop Abortion Dr. Killing

Opinions vary on whether the FBI could have stopped this from happening. But outspoken ex-FBI agent Colleen Rowley of post-9/11 fame, seems to think the agency could have at least tried harder. Is she right?

FBI Agent Colleen Rowley/ photo ia.ucsb.edu

Ex-FBI Agent Colleen Rowley/ photo ia.ucsb.edu

By Zachary Roth
TPMmuckraker

We told you earlier about questions over whether the FBI responded aggressively enough to detailed information it got about Scott Roeder, who’s charged with killing Kansas doctor George Tiller.

And one prominent former bureau veteran says the answer is no.

Colleen Rowley — who made the cover of Time magazine in 2002 after blowing the whistle on the FBI’s failure before 9/11 to follow up on information about the so-called “20th hijacker” — told TPMmuckraker that the Roeder case “should have been jumped on much more aggressively,” given Roeder’s prior record, and the information the FBI appears to have received about him in the days before Tiller’s murder.

A worker at an abortion clinic, Jeffrey Pederson (a pseudonym to protect his identity), has said that Roeder was seen twice in the week before the Tiller shooting trying to glue shut the clinic’s doors. Pederson reported both incidents to the FBI. And Roeder served jail time after being convicted in 1997 of having bomb-making parts in his car.

For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST