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Tag: drug traffickers

Congressman Pushes Bill to Rename ATF Headquarters After Slain Agent Ariel Rios

Ariel Rios

Ariel Rios

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Congressman André Carson from Indiana hopes history repeats itself.

The Congressman has introduced a bill to name ATF headquarters at 99 New York Avenue NE in Washington as the Ariel Rios Federal Building.

ATF agent Rios, 28, was murdered by drug traffickers in Miami in 1982 while assigned to then Vice President George Bush’s South Florida Drug Task Force. He was the first ATF agent killed by hostile action.

It’s not such an unusual request considering the old ATF headquarters at 1200 Pennsylvania Ave NW was named after Rios in 1985.

In 2007, ATF moved into a more secure headquarters on New York Avenue, but Congress never named the new building after Rios.

“Naming the ATF headquarters after Ariel Rios is an important symbolic reminder of risks faced by ATF’s front line agents and their ongoing service to our country,” said Rep. Carson in a letter to colleagues asking them to co-sponsor the bill. “As a former law enforcement officer, I believe this important recognition  of Ariel Rios will serve as a tribute to every frontline law enforcement officer past, present, and future.”

According to ATF, Rios and another agent, Alex D’Atri,  made arrangements to meet with two suspects at the Hurricane Motel in Miami to make an undercover buy of large quantities of cocaine and machineguns. One of the suspects suddenly became suspicious, drew his weapon and made threats.

Rios struggled with him and was shot. He died shortly after in the hospital. The other agent, D’Atri, was shot and wounded but survived.   

Read Rep. André Carson’s full letter to Congressional colleagues.

Dear Colleague:

I am writing to ask you to cosponsor the “Ariel Rios Federal Building Act”
which  will name the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
(ATF) headquarters in honor of its first special agent killed by hostile
action. This bill will designate the federal building at 99 New York Avenue,
NE Washington D.C. as the Ariel Rios Federal Building. Ariel Rios was a
young ATF special agent murdered by drug traffickers in 1982 while assigned
to then Vice President George Bush’s South Florida Drug Task Force.

In 1985, Congress designated the ATF headquarters building at 1200
Pennsylvania Avenue as the Ariel Rios Memorial Federal Building.  The
designation honored both the personal sacrifice of Ariel Rios and served as
an enduring reminder of the dangers that front line law enforcement officers
willingly confront to keep the rest of us safe.  For nearly 30 years, the
original ATF headquarters building bore the name of Ariel Rios.

Read more »

Mexican Drug Traffickers Are Hacking Border Patrol Drones to Trick Agents

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Drug traffickers are hacking Border Patrol drones along the U.S.-Mexico border to confuse federal investigators, Hackread.com reports. 

Drones used by law enforcement are not as expensive and hack-proof like the ones flown by the U.S. military.

As Hackread.com explains it, “standard drone modules need to be deleted including the one that ensures the security of the drone in the case of GPS spoofing.”

What happens is, attackers send fake GPS data to receivers on the drone, making it difficult to track would-be traffickers.

Due to fake coordinates, federal agents are tricked into believing the drone is over one area when in fact it’s over an entirely different area.

Former Governor of Tamaulipas, Mexico Is Indicted on Racketeering Charges

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The former governor of the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico has been indicted on charges that he allowed large-scale drug rings to operate in exchange for large bribes from drug traffickers, the FBI announced Monday.

Tomas Yarrington Ruvalcaba, 56 was charged with the RICO statute and several conspiracy charges.

Ruvalcaba, who served as governor from 1999 to 2004, is accused of helping with the shipment of massive amounts of cocaine, much of which ended up in the U.S.

Yarrington also is charged with collecting bribes from businesses that wanted to do work for the state.

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Former Army Snipers Arrested in Alleged Plan to Assassinate DEA Agent

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Two former U.S. Army snipers and a retired sharpshooter planned to assassinate a DEA agent and an informant in Africa, the Justice Department announced, reports the USA Today.

The murders-for-hire were part of a bold plan to fly hundreds of kilograms of cocaine from Colombia to the U.S., the federal government alleges.

The snipers were charged Friday.

The Colombian “drug traffickers” were acting as confidential sources for the DEA, the USA Today reported.

Two other experienced snipers, one from Poland and the other from Germany, were arrested for allegedly being involved in the original plot, the USA Today wrote.

The “bone-chilling allegations read like they were ripped from the pages of a Tom Clancy novel,” U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement announcing the indictment.

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Authorities in Awe of Drug Runners’ Jungle-Built, Kevlar-Coated Super Subs


By Jim Popkin
WIRED

The clatter of helicopter blades echoed across the jungles of northwestern Ecuador. Antinarcotics commandos in three choppers peered at the mangroves below, scanning for any sign of activity. The police had received a tip that a gang of Colombian drug smugglers had set up a clandestine work site here, in a dense swamp 5 miles south of Colombia’s border. And whatever the traffickers were building, the tipster had warned, was truly enormous.

For decades, Colombian drug runners have pursued their trade with diabolical ingenuity, staying a step ahead of authorities by coming up with one innovation after another. When false-paneled pickups and tractor-trailers began drawing suspicion at US checkpoints, the cartels and their Mexican partners built air-conditioned tunnels under the border. When border agents started rounding up too many human mules, one group of Colombian smugglers surgically implanted heroin into purebred puppies. But the drug runners’ most persistently effective method has also been one of the crudest—semisubmersible vessels that cruise or are towed just below the ocean’s surface and can hold a ton or more of cocaine.

Assembled in secret shipyards along the Pacific coast, they’ve been dubbed drug subs by the press, but they’re incapable of diving or maneuvering like real submarines. In fact, they’re often just cigarette boats encased in wood and fiberglass that are scuttled after a single mission. Yet despite their limitations, these semisubmersibles are notoriously difficult to track. US and Colombian officials estimate that the cartels have used them to ship hundreds of tons of cocaine from Colombia over the past five years alone.

But several years ago, intelligence agencies began hearing that the cartels had made a technological breakthrough: They were constructing some kind of supersub in the jungle.

To read full story click here.

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