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Tag: Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

Friend of Suspected Boston Marathon Bombers Was Followed by FBI Last Year

Khairullozhon MatanovSteve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI was closely monitoring a friend of the suspected Boston Marathon bombers last year and even urged him to avoid Boston’s Fourth of July fireworks, the Boston Globe reports.

The agents were ordered to “make sure they stay with Mr. [Khairullozhon] Matanov, and don’t lose him,” Special Agent Timothy McElroy told US Magistrate Judge Marianne B. Bowler in court.

Prosecutors said the 23-year-old Matanov, who was charged with obstruction of justice last week, lied about interacting with the brothers on the week of the attack.

The FBI told Matanov to stay away from the fireworks and the Boston Marathon to avoid alarming people.

Matanov, a native of Kyrgyzstan, faces up to 20 years in prison.

Did FBI Agents Violate Rights of Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect During Aggressive Interrogation?

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s interrogation of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev violated his rights while he he lay in pain in a hospital bed immediately following his arrest, his defense lawyers argued in court documents Wednesday.

The Chicago Tribune reports that FBI agents ignored Tsarnaev’s 10 requests for a lawyer even though authorities determined further dangers to the public did not exist.

“The questioning continued for hours, in what was obviously an effort to extract as much incriminating information as possible, without regard for the protections of the Fifth Amendment,” his lawyers wrote in the 21-page filing.

Lawyers are asking for the hospital statements to be suppressed because he was heavily sedated and in a lot of pain during the interviews.

Tsarnaev, 20, is charged with killing three people and wounding more than 260 others with his brother, Tamerlan, who was killed during a manhunt for the duo.

Defense for Boston Bombing Suspect Claim FBI Is ‘Needlessly Intrusive’ in Counsel’s Meetings with Client

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev are complaining that the FBI is getting in the way of legal counsel’s constitutional rights to meet with their client in private.

The Boston Globe reports that lawyers filed the complaints in court late Monday, saying FBI continues to be “needlessly intrusive.”

The lawyers said the FBI has ignored previous orders by U.S. District Court Judge George A. O’Toole Jr. to allow the counsel to meet with the suspect without being monitored.

“Defense counsel are thus more convinced than ever of the need for a reasonable degree of privacy and confidentiality for this series of legal visits and request that the court so order,” the lawyers argued.

Tsarnaev, who is now 20, is in federal prison awaiting trial on claims that he helped set off bombs on April 15, 2013, that killed three and injured more than 260 near the finish line of the Boston Globe.

Opinion: FBI Has Plenty of Questions to Answer About Its Repeated Failures Following Boston Marathon Attack

By The Rutland Herald
Editorial Board

As Boston marks the first anniversary of the Marathon bombings, one chapter closes. But there’s still enough to fill a book — especially when it comes to the role of the FBI.

Questions about it pour from the pages of numerous post-bombing government reports. An assessment by the House Homeland Security Committee challenges the FBI’s resistance to information sharing. A review done by various intelligence agencies highlights missed opportunities involving the threat posed by a radicalized Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Reports by a Florida prosecutor and the Department of Justice address the shooting death of Ibragim Todashev, who tied Tamerlan Tsarnaev to a triple homicide in Waltham, Mass., on Sept. 11, 2011. Unsurprisingly, both reports conclude that Todashev’s shooting by an FBI agent was justified. But why was Todashev questioned in his Orlando apartment, with access to items that could be used as weapons, rather than in a more secure environment?

Lawyers for Tamerlan’s brother, Dzhokhar, also claim the FBI sought to turn Tamerlan into an informant. The government said it has “no evidence” of that, which doesn’t exactly shut the door on the possibility.

Richard DesLauriers, the now retired FBI agent who was in charge of the Boston office and the Marathon investigation, went on “60 Minutes” to explain how the FBI identified the bombers. But the FBI has never told the public who interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev, nor explained why that agent failed to recognize the older brother from the surveillance video. So much for that old saying that a police officer never forgets a face. If this agent remembered Tamerlan’s face, it might have averted the public release of the video and the manhunt and violence that followed.

One-Year Anniversary of Boston Marathon Bombings Brings Unanswered Questions

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

One year after twin pressure cooker bombs detonated at the Boston Marathon bombings, many questions remain.

Why did federal authorities miss an opportunity to act on a warning from Russia that bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was becoming radicalized? How much of a role did his younger brother, Dzhokhar, play in attack? Would the brothers have launched an attack in New York?

“The obvious one is the motivation and how could two young men who were in a country that, from all appearances, was very good to them end up this radical,” former Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis, who helped lead the investigation, told the Associated Press.

The April 15 bombings killed three people and injured 260 more. At least 16 people lost limbs, the AP wrote.

Book Review: ”Long Mile Home,’ Recounts Boston Marathon Bombing Investigation

By Aamer Madhani
USA Today

On the first-year anniversary of a national tragedy, it’s inevitable for the so-called definitive account to be rolled out by publishers calculating that enough time has passed for an author to have developed perspective, but not so much time that the calamity is no longer fresh in the public’s conscience.

Publishing houses are, more often than not, wrong. Too often, readers, including this one, feel burned by investing time and cash in what too frequently reads like notebook dumps by journalists on the front line of a big story. The works ultimately don’t stand the test of time.

But with Long Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, The City’s Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for Justice, The Boston Globe‘s Scott Helman and Jenna Russell prove there are exceptions.

Long Mile Home, which arrives just ahead of the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings and the subsequent manhunt of Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is a riveting piece of journalism and an exceptional tribute to a great American city that manages to avoid being sentimental or syrupy.

Helman and Russell, two of the Globe‘s best reporters, relied heavily on their colleagues’ outstanding coverage of the bombing and the aftermath in weaving a narrative around several principal characters.

FBI Describes Eureka Moment While Watching Videos of Boston Marathon Bombing

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

FBI agents watched the video “hundreds and hundreds” times.

For those investigating the Boston Marathon bombing, the video was a eureka moment, the Boston Globe reports, citing a “60 Minutes” video.

Stephanie Douglas, executive assistant director of the FBI’s national security branch, said the video, which has not been released, shows a man in a white cap droping off a backpack and then failing to turn his head like everyone else when the bomb exploded.

He does not do what everybody else in that video does. He does not turn to his left,” Douglas said. “He instead just stands there for a second or two and walks very deliberately back the same direction that he came in.”

Authorities believe the man in the video was Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, one of the bombing suspects.

FBI Stands Behind Decision to Release Photos of Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect

Officer Sean Collier

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI did the right thing by releasing photos of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects last year, even though it led to the death of an MIT police officer.

The Associated Press reports that Stephanie Douglas, an executive assistant director of the FBI’s Security Division, said law enforcement “really had no choice” but to release the photos of Dzhohkar Tsarnaev and his brother Tamerlan.

While on the run, the brothers killed MIT Officer Sean Collier.

“Believe me, the death of Sean Collier is not lost on the FBI,” she said. “But I think at the end of the day, given the facts as we knew them at the time, we made the best decision.”