best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter


[quads id=4]

Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2018
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter


[quads id=3]

Tag: El Salvador

FBI Captures Georgia Man Wanted in 1996 Murder

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Hector Ulises Garay spent 22 years running from charges that he murdered a Georgia man during an attempted robbery.

The 51-year-old fugitive is now behind bars after he was captured in El Salvador, where members of the FBI’s Atlanta Metro Major Offender Task Force picked him up and transported him back to Atlanta. He’s now lodged in the Gwinnett County Jail without bond on murder charges. 

Border agents in Central America flagged Garay when he tried to travel from El Salvador to Honduras.

“It doesn’t matter how long it takes. These fugitives never go off our radar,” FBI spokesperson Kevin Rowson to Fox 5 News

Gary is accused of murdering Adalberto Salines during an attempted robbery at Salines’ home on Jan. 21, 1996.

According to the FBI, Garay shot and killed Salines when he wouldn’t let him in the home. “We don’t believe people should get away with murder,” Rowson said. 

Other Stories of Interest

Could the Secret Service Scandal be Bigger?


Sen. Grassley/official photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Just when it looked as if the Secret Service might be able to wrap up its prostitution mess sooner than later.

CBS is reporting that authorities were looking into the possibility that Secret Service agents may have paid for hookers and strippers in El Salvador while being part of an advance team for the President in March 2011.

“This latest allegation only reaffirms the need for independent investigations by the Inspector General,” Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Ia.) said in a statement issued Thursday.

“Regardless of whether the incidents were previously referred to internal investigators, they need to be examined. There are rumors flying about various incidents over several years about the conduct of Secret Service personnel, as well as other law enforcement and military personnel in locations around the world. The only way to put to rest the rumors of a much wider problem is for the allegations to receive transparent and independent reviews.”

Entering Fingerprints in ICE Database Could Have Prevented Rape of 8-Year-Old Girl

ice photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

It may have been a minor oversight the time — but the misstep could have prevented the rape of an 8-year-old girl.

Tom Jackman of the Washington Post reports that immigration authorities failed to enter in a national data base the fingerprints of Salvador Portillo-Saravia before they deported him to  El Salvador in 2003.  So seven years later, because his fingerprints were not in a data base, Portillo-Saravia, who had sneaked back into the U.S., was released from the Loudoun County Jail in Virginia. A month later, Jackman reports, Fairfax County police say he raped an 8-year-old girl.

In a letter to  Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.) , Elliot Williams, Immigration and Customs Enforcement  assistant director for congressional relations, wrote that “the agency policy to enroll the fingerprints in IDENT was not followed, thereby reducing ICE’s ability to thwart this terrible and tragic event.” according to the Post. The paper wrote that ” ICE officials could not say why the prints weren’t entered in 2003.”

The paper reported Portillo-Saravia was captured last month in Houston and is now facing the rape charges.

To read more click here.

Violent Mexican Drug Cartels Spreading to Central America

Central-America-map-01By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The cancerous violence of the Mexican drug cartels seems to be spreading into Central America where the drug networks are burrowing in, the Washington Post reports.

And the presence of the cartels threatens to destabalize the countries that already face daunting crime figures, the Post reported.

The Mexican cartels “are spreading their horizons to states where they feel, quite frankly, more comfortable. These governments in Central America face a very real challenge in confronting these organizations,” David Gaddis, chief of operations for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration told the Post.

To read more click here.

[quads id=1]