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Tag: employment

Immigration-Rights Group Offers to Find ICE Agents Jobs If They Quit Their Jobs

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Activists are offering to help ICE agents find new jobs if they quit working for the agency.

The immigration-rights group Never Again Action held a jobs program for ICE agents on Monday, and organizers said two ICE agents asked for help finding new employment.

“A lot of the protesters were chanting ‘quit your job,’” Baselt told The Daily Beast. “I saw an interaction between one protester and a relatively young DHS [Department of Homeland Security] agent who was standing outside the building […] The protester was asking him whether he was OK with what was happening at the border, if he was OK with kids in cages.”

The recruitment effort comes amid a period of low parole for immigration employees, some of whom reportedly committed suicide.

Senators Introduce Bill Aimed at Increasing Number of Border Patrol Agents

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake and Heidi Heitkamp introduced legislation aimed at increasing the number of Border Patrol agents at ports of entry.

The legislation, the Customs and Border Protection and Hiring Retention Act, is deigned to eliminate recruitment obstacles and help retain agents, the Republican and Democrat said in a press release

“Arizona can’t afford for its ports to go on strained and understaffed,” Flake, R-Ariz., said in the release. “By tackling CBP’s hiring problems head-on, this bill will help strengthen border security and facilitate the cross-border trade that is critical to Arizona’s economy.”

The senators said Border Patrol is short of about 1,000 agents.

The legislation would provide incentives for Border Patrol agents to stay on the job and not go to other agencies.

“In my visits with border security officials and personnel in Portal last month and Pembina last year, a key concern I heard over and over from agents on the ground was about their abilities to both attract and retain quality workers to best protect our communities – and it’s those challenges that our bipartisan bill would work to address. This effort expands on my work in the U.S. Senate to make it easier to hire and retain federal employees, like border patrol agents, at remote locations such as at the Northern Border. And my bipartisan bill to assess threats to the Northern Border and examine employee recruitment and retention issues is expected to soon be signed into law. Our border patrol agents work to keep our borders protected, and they need to have the resources and support to keep our communities safe,” said Heitkamp, D-N.D.

Other Stories of Interest

DEA Agents Allege Management Discriminates Against Military Reservists

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Sixteen DEA agents who also serve as military reservists have filed a complain that alleges they are discriminated against by management, CBS 8 reports. 

“They (DEA) have a consistent, perpetual harassment that continues to escalate,” said DEA Special Agent Mark Coast of San Diego. “Servicemen should not be treated as second class citizens.”

The agents said management doesn’t like that reservists have to take time off work.

“You sit at your desk and your supervisors will constantly come by and tell you, ‘You need to get out of the service. You can’t serve two masters,'” said Coast, a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves since 1987.

The complaint alleges that DEA management routinely subject military reservists to “hostile and offensive comments in the workplace.”

The DEA declined to comment.

Other Stories of Interest


Help Wanted: Border Patrol to Hire 1,600 New Agents Nationwide

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The federal government wants to hire about 1,600 Border Patrol agents by Sept. 30 to fill vacancies across the country.

Applications will be accepted at USAJobs until May 31.

There are currently about 20,000 agents assigned across 6,000 miles of border land.

Applicants must be under the age of 37 and be U.S. citizens. Drug tests and fitness exams also are included.

A Border Patrol agent starts out at about $39,000 and is capable of making more than $70,000 with promotions.

Other Stories of Interest

 

Catch-22 for FBI Linguists Who Come Under Suspicion for Preparing for Job

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

How’s this for a Catch-22?

To be a linguist for the FBI, you typically need to spend a few years in a foreign country, creating ties with the residents and learning the language.

But living and developing ties in some foreign countries can raise red flags within the FBI, sometimes delaying career advancements, the Atlantic reports.

FBI employees with ties to some countries are placed in a program, Post-Adjudication Risk Management, or PARM, which requires employees to undergo additional polygraph tests, security screenings and other scrutiny.

“Thirteen years after the September 11 terrorist attacks, it’s worth asking whether such security safeguards do more harm than good,” the Atlantic ponders.

FBI Has Criminal Records on Roughly 1 of 3 Americans, Causing Headaches for Those Never Charged

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s enormous criminal database includes records of about one out of every three American adults, Gizmodo reports.

The FBI has criminal records on more than 77.7 million Americans, and the bureau is adding between 10,000 and 12,000 new people a day.

The arrest records can be problematic because they don’t typically describe whether the person was convicted or just accused.

The records are often used for employment, loans and housing.

Report: FBI Background Checks Are Riddled with Inaccuracies That Cost People Jobs

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As employers increasingly rely on FBI background checks before hiring prospective employees, a new report shows the process is riddled with errors and omissions, The Columbus Dispatch reports.

The report from the Employment Law Project estimates that 1.8 million workers are subjected to faulty background checks.

“As millions of workers struggle to navigate a still-challenging job market, the FBI must avoid creating wrongful barriers that cause unnecessary job loss and financial harm,” the report’s authors wrote. “The FBI is more than a mere receptacle of information; the imprimatur of the FBI marks the records as authoritative and trustworthy.”

That’s not good news for the increasing number of people who are subjected to FBI background checks. In the past decade, the number increased six times to 17 million last year.