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Tag: GPS

Mexican Drug Traffickers Are Hacking Border Patrol Drones to Trick Agents

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Drug traffickers are hacking Border Patrol drones along the U.S.-Mexico border to confuse federal investigators, Hackread.com reports. 

Drones used by law enforcement are not as expensive and hack-proof like the ones flown by the U.S. military.

As Hackread.com explains it, “standard drone modules need to be deleted including the one that ensures the security of the drone in the case of GPS spoofing.”

What happens is, attackers send fake GPS data to receivers on the drone, making it difficult to track would-be traffickers.

Due to fake coordinates, federal agents are tricked into believing the drone is over one area when in fact it’s over an entirely different area.

Homeland Security to Track Some Immigrants with GPS Devices to Test Reporting Compliance

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

GPS-enabled ankle bracelets are an effective way to keep track of parolees and others in trouble with the law.

Now Homeland Security is beginning to give the bracelets to some parents captured crossing the Mexican border illegal with their children, the Associated Press reports.

The parents were ordered to report back to immigration officials.

About 70% of parents fail to report to immigration officials, Homeland Security officials said in September.

Under the pilot program, Homeland Security will track about 250 “heads of household.”

Other Stories of Interest


Chicago Bank Robber Handed More Than Cash, Helping Lead to His Arrest

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Chicago bank teller who was getting robbed gave up more than $1,700.

The Chicago Tribune reports that the bank employee also handed the robber a global-positioning system that helped the FBI and local police track him down.

The GPS device activated as soon as the robber left the bank, alerting authorities to the suspect’s every move.

When police tracked down 32-year-old Nathan A. Reed, they found $1,660 in cash, wrapped in a bank money band, and the GPS tracker.

He’s scheduled to appear in federal court on Friday.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Justice Department to Offer GPS Devices for Autistic Children Following Death of 14-Year-Old

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Children suffering from severe autism and similar conditions should soon be eligible for GPS tracking devices paid for by taxpyaers, Time reports.

New York Sen.Charles Schumer said the idea is to help parents find their children if they stray off.

The devices from the Justice Department cost about $85 each, Time wrote.

The news comes after a severely autistic 14-year-old, Avonte Oquendo, went missing in October and was later found dead in the East River.

Schumer said the goal is to secure long-term funding.

Government Must Get Warrant for GPS for Car, Appeals Court Rules

By Andrea Peterson
Washington Post

WASHINGTON — A federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled Tuesday that the government must obtain a warrant to attach a GPS unit to a car.

The case involved alleged pharmacy burglaries in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland: the authorities suspected a trio of brothers and slapped a magnetic GPS unit to one of their vehicles after consulting the U.S. Attorney’s office — but without obtaining a warrant. Using the evidence gathered from the device, the vehicle was tracked to a recently burglarized RiteAid. Police stopped the brothers shortly afterward, and a search allegedly revealed items from the RiteAid.

In the resulting case, U.S. v. Katzin, the brothers argued that the evidence obtained as a result of the GPS unit should be inadmissible because the police had not obtained a warrant.

To read more click here.

ACLU Lashes Out at FBI for Refusing to Release Details of Warrantless GPS Spying

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The ACLU is incensed that the FBI won’t hand over details of how agents have used warrantless GPS trackers on cars to monitor suspects, Salon.com reports.

Responding to a request for public information, the FBI redacted virtually every word from the records, saying the information is privileged, Salon.com reports.

The ACLU wants to see other tracking methods used by federal agents following a Supreme Court ruling that determined GPS trackers require a search warrant. The group also wants to know how the FBI plans to retrieve GPS trackers already on cars.

“The Justice Department’s unfortunate decision leaves Americans with no clear understanding of when we will be subjected to tracking—possibly for months at a time—or whether the government will first get a warrant,” wrote Catherine Crump, an ACLU staff attorney.

Authorities Quickly Track Down Bank Robber with GPS Device

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A GPS-tracking device stuffed into a bag of stolen bank money let to the arrest of a 29-year-old man who tried to get away with more than $7,000 from a financial institution in Illinois, The Chicago Tribune reports.

FBI spokeswoman Joan Hyde said Miguel A. Ramirez was charged in a criminal complaint with one count of bank robbery after he demanded money from an Aurora bank.

What he didn’t know was the gray plastic bag of money included a GPS tracking device, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Ramirez was tracked to a gas station and arrested within 30 minutes of the robbery.

Supreme Court Ruling Prompts FBI to Turn Off About 3,000 GPS Devices

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

It’s fair to surmise that the FBI has a surplus of GPS devices that are just going to be sitting around.

The Wall Street Journal reports that FBI General Counsel Andrew Weissmann said at a conference Friday that a Supreme Court ruling requiring a court order before placing a GPS on someone’s car has prompted the FBI to turn off about 3,000 GPS devices that were in use.

Weissmann made his comments at a University of San Francisco conference called “Big Brother in the 21st Century.”

The Journal reports that the devices were often placed underneath cars to track movements.