best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: hacker

Hacker Group ‘Anonymous’ Says It Shut Down Cleveland’s Website Over Police Shooting

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Notorious hacker group Anonymous took credit for shutting down the city of Cleveland’s website Monday, prompting an FBI investigation, Cleveland.com reports.

Anonymous said the website was hacked in response to the police shooting of Tamir Rice, who was killed Saturday while carrying an airsoft gun.

The website was still down Tuesday morning.

“The city of Cleveland and our website vendor are reviewing the incident and determining proper preventative measures to be added in order to ensure future attacks are thwarted,” city spokesman Daniel Ball said.

Anonymous posted a video on YouTube, saying Tamir was shot “in cold blood.”

“Police of the United States you will learn in due time once anonymous has shut down your sites that we will not stand for your ignorant untrained rookie cops,” the message said.

 

Justice Department Says It Has Mastermind in Prolific Cyber Attacks That Robbed Consumers, Businesses

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The Justice Department boasted Monday that it captured one of the most prolific cyber criminals in the world in the continuing effort to crack down on the evolving cybercrime threat, the Associated Press reports.

Federal officials said 30-year-old Evgeniy Bogachev of Russia was the ringleader of a band of backers who infected hundreds of thousand of computers worldwide and stole more than $100 million from consumers and businesses.

As part of the scheme, the attackers implanted computers with malicious software to collect bank account numbers and passwords. The hackers also seized personal information like pictures and files from computers and only agreed to return control to users when they paid several hundred dollars in ransom.

Federal officials are working with Russia to bring U.S. charges against Bogachev.

FBI Informant’s Ties to Cyberattacks Abroad Raise Questions About Bureau’s Intentions

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Is the FBI using hackers to gain access to intelligence overseas?

The New York Times reports that an FBI informant launched hundreds of cyberattacks on foreign websites, including ones run by other governments, even as the bureau tried to dismantle hacking groups like Anonymous.

New information indicates that the cyberattacks even targeted websites operated by Iran, Pakistan, Brazil and Syria.

What remains unclear is whether the FBI directly ordered the attacks, the Times wrote.

The mastermind behind the attacks was Hector Xavier Monsegur, a hacker within Anonymous, who was arrested and in exchange began working to help the FBI identify other members of the hacking group.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

FBI’s Search for ‘Mo,’ Suspect in Bomb Threats, Highlights Use of Malware for Surveillance


By Craig Timberg and Ellen Nakashima
Washington Post Staff Writers

WASHINGTON –– The man who called himself “Mo” had dark hair, a foreign accent and — if the pictures he e-mailed to federal investigators could be believed — an Iranian military uniform. When he made a series of threats to detonate bombs at universities and airports across a wide swath of the United States last year, police had to scramble every time.

Mo remained elusive for months, communicating via ­e-mail, video chat and an ­Internet-based phone service without revealing his true identity or location, court documents show. So with no house to search or telephone to tap, investigators turned to a new kind of surveillance tool delivered over the Internet.

The FBI’s elite hacker team designed a piece of malicious software that was to be delivered secretly when Mo signed on to his Yahoo e-mail account, from any computer anywhere in the world, according to the documents. The goal of the software was to gather a range of information — Web sites he had visited and indicators of the location of the computer — that would allow investigators to find Mo and tie him to the bomb threats.

To read the full story click here.

FBI Turns Focus on Cyber Attacks in US

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI is combating a surge in cyberattacks on corporate America, trying to stop a growing number of people from hacking websites and disturbing commerce, the Los Angeles Times reports.

In just the past month, a group called the Syrian Electronic Army crippled the New York Times website for several hours. Hackers also have attacked other well-known sites.

Combating the hackers is a new challenge for the FBI and underscores how vulnerable digital information is.

Leading that battle is Austin Berglas, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI’s cyber branch in New York. Berglas has responsibility over agents who handle major cyber cases, the LA Times wrote.

To read his interview with the Times click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Indian Hacker Group Claims Government Intercepted US-China Communications; FBI Investigates

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

So much for diplomacy.

An Indian computer hacking group has got the FBI investigating its claims that India’s intelligence services intercepted communications among the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, according to ABC News.

The hacking group posted documents online about a month ago alleging to be from India’s Directorate General of Military Intelligence, and they include about 10  emails from the commission between September and October of 2011. The Congressionally mandated commission reports to Congress every year on national security, trade and economic issue with China, according to ABC.

The emails appear to be genuine, reports ABC, but the document has not been authenticated.

The hacking group which posted the documents go by the name the Lords of Dharamraja.

To read more click here. To see the document click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST:

 

Hacking Group “Anonymous” Stole Thousands of Credit Card Numbers to Make Donations to Charities

Calif. Man Gets 6 Years for Tormenting Victims in “Sextortion” Case

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

In the eyes of authorities, Luis Mijangos was a skilled computer hacker who went on the rampage and tried to extort sexually explicit videos from women and girls in what some referred to as a “sextortion” case.

On Thursday, Mijangos ,32, an illegal immigrant from Mexico, who lived in Santa Ana, Calif., was sentenced to 6 years in prison in Los Angeles federal court for his sinister crime.

Authorities said that FBI computer forensics experts determined that Mijangos infected more than 100 computers that were used by approximately 230 individuals, of which at least 44 were juveniles.

The affidavit in the case alleged that Mijangos infected computers around the world with a malicious computer code, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

Mijangos then got his victims to download “the malware onto their computers by making the files appear to be popular songs,” the U.S. Attorney’s Office stated. “After the victims downloaded the malware, Mijangos was able to control their computers, allowing him to send instant messages containing malware from those computers to other people in the victims’ address books. These later victims thought they were receiving messages from friends or family members.”

Authorities said once he got into the computers, he searched for sexually explicit or intimate images and videos of women and girls in ” various states of undress or engaged in sexual acts with their partners.”

Mijangos contacted the female victims and threatened to distribute intimate images and videos to people in their contact list unless they made additional explicit videos for him.

He also told victims he could tell via their computers if they tried calling police, and threatened to release the videos and images if they called authorities, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

On top of all of that, he also allegedly installed a “keylogger” on victims’ computers to record every key strokes on the infected computers and was then able to steal credit card numbers and personal identifying info to purchase merchandise, authorities alleged.

He also hacked into victims’ boyfriends email account, posed as the boyfriends and asked them to create to create pornographic videos for him, authorities said. After that, he contacted the victims — using an alias — and threatened to distribute the explicit videos if they didn’t send him more.

As if that wasn’t enough, on occasion he was able to access webcams to catch victims in intimate situations.

Authorities said Mijangos told FBI agents that he hacked into the computers, but did so on behalf of husbands and boyfriends to see if the women were cheating on them.

“We now live in a world gone digital, relying on our personal computers for everything from banking, to learning, to intimate communications with friends and family,” said United States Attorney André Birotte Jr. in a statement.  “Mr. Mijangos invaded the sanctity of many personal digital worlds and used intimate content to victimize and prey upon unsuspecting victims.”

Added Steven M. Martinez, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office, stated: “The sentence imposed on Mr. Mijangos is appropriate based on the chilling impact his behavior had on scores of young women. The FBI has seen a rise in similar cases based on the exploitation of emerging technologies by criminals, and it’s my hope that this sentence serves as a warning for victims of Internet predators to advise law enforcement or a trusted source when threatened, and always refrain from sending compromising photographs via cyberspace.”

Authorities said during Thursday’s sentencing hearing, two sextortion victims described how they were subjected to “nightmare” situations. One young woman said that before Mijangos victimized her she had been a victim of domestic violence, “and I want to tell you, there’s no difference.”

In sentencing Mijangos, Judge George H. King said: “This was nothing short of a sustained effort to terrorize victims.”