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Tag: homeland security committee

New Report: Nearly Half of TSA Employees Accused of Misconduct

tsaBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Nearly half of all TSA employees have been accused of some form of misconduct between 2013 and 2015, according to a new report from the House Homeland Security Committee.

Among the complaints are sexual misconduct, bribery and failure to follow TSA procedures.

The number of complaints between 2013 and 2015 rose nearly 29%.

In an attempt to curtail misconduct, the Government Accountability Office recommended that the agency implement a better review process for allegations.

Other Stories of Interest

Head of House Homeland Security Committee Warns of ‘Gaping Holes’ for Terrorism

U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul

U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The U.S. is vulnerable to attack on the scale of the one in Paris because of “gaping holes” in security, the head of the House Homeland Security Committee warned Sunday, The Hill reports. 

“There are a lot of holes — gaping holes,” Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas) said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

“We have hundreds of Americans that have traveled” to Iraq and Syria, he added. “Many of them have come back as well. I think that’s a direct threat.”

McCaul said he is concerned with how easily Europeans and Americans can travel to Iraq and Syria.

He also expressed concerns about terrorists slipping into the U.S. by posing as Syrian refugees.  t

“This causes a great concern on the part of policymakers, because we don’t want to be complicit with a program that could bring potential terrorists into the United States,” McCaul said.

Other Stories of Interest

U.S. Probes Potential for Domestic Terrorism in Light of Military Involvement in Syria

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As the prospect of U.S. military involvement in Syria raises, the House Homeland Security Committee plans to meet Tuesday to discuss the potential domestic security implications, The Star-Ledger reports.

Authorities are worried that a military strike would inflame anti-American sentiments and prompt a terrorist attack.

“In light of the atrocities witnessed in Syria, today our nation faces difficult choices,” the committee chairman, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Tex.), said in a statement. “We must determine how the civil war in Syria affects our national security interests, and the ramifications of our action or inaction in the Syrian conflict. Ultimately, without an international coalition or a clear military objective, sending ‘warning’ shots may risk entangling the U.S. in a war where a rogue regime is fighting a rebel force infiltrated by extremists who count the U.S. as their enemy. Such an action will not secure Assad’s deadly chemical weapons, which could end up in the hands of al Qaeda.”

President Obama has throated to use military force after the Syrian government was accused last month of killing more than 1,400 people win a chemical weapons attack.

Coalition of Civil Rights Groups Calls for Congressional Hearings on DEA Surveillance

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Revelations that the DEA uses NSA data to investigate non-terrorism cases against Americans has prompted a coalition of two dozen civil rights groups to call for congressional hearings, Reuters reports.

The call for hearings comes after Reuters revealed that the DEA uses telephone surveillance from the NSA to build criminal cases against Americans.

“The implications of the Reuters revelations are serious and far-reaching,” the groups wrote Thursday to Congressional leaders on judiciary, homeland security and oversight committees, the wire service reported.

“For too long Congress has given the DEA a free pass,” said Bill Piper of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Our hope is that Congress does its job and provides oversight of an agency that has a long track record of deeply troubling behavior.”

NY Cop Who Cracked Copycat Zodiac Killer Case Assigned to Homeland Security Committe in Washington


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Star New York cop Joseph Herbert, who cracked the Zodiac copycat killer case in 1996, has been assigned to work as an expert on the Homeland Security Committee, the New York Daily News reported.

The Daily News reported that Herbert becomes the first New York cop to be assigned to a Congressional Committee.

“Inspector Herbert is just an incredible addition to the committee,” Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.) , chair of the committee, told the Daily News. “He brings the expertise of the No. 1 counterterrorism police unit in the country. It gives us a tremendous source of knowledge.”

Inspector Herbert, 53, who heads the NYPD’s Intelligence Operations and Analysis Section, cracked the copycat Zodiac killer case as a detective in 1996. The killer Heriberto (Eddie) Seda, shot to death three people and wounded four others between 1990-1993.