Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

August 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: immigration reform

USA Today Column: Tough Immigration Rules Backfire, Keeping Migrants Inside US or Locking Them Out

Alex Nowrasteh
USA Today

President Obama’s recent request for billions of dollars to address the surge in unaccompanied children across the U.S.-Mexico border has ignited fierce criticism. Republicans such as Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas blame Obama’s supposedly lax enforcement policies. Democrats blame the surge on a humanitarian crisis in Central America.

While both narratives bear some truth, both miss how our immigration restrictions and border enforcement have created the current mess.

Migration from Central America and Mexico used to be circular. Migrants would come for a season or a few years to work, move back home, then return to the USA when there was more work. This reigned from the 1920s to 1986, when Congress passed the more restrictive Immigration Reform and Control Act. Before 1986, when circular migration was in effect, 60% of unauthorized immigrants on their first trip here would eventually settle back in their home countries rather than in the United States, and 80% of undocumented immigrants who came back on a second trip eventually returned home.

Since 1986, the rate of return for first-time border crossers has fallen to almost zero. The return rate of second-time crossers has fallen to a mere 30%. What happened? In the mid-1980s, the government began spending massive resources to stop unauthorized immigrants from coming in the first place. By trying to keep them out, increases in border security locked them in.

To read more, click here.

Illegal Immigrants Have ‘Earned the Right to Be Citizens,’ DHS Secretary Says

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

About 11 million illegal immigration in the U.S. have “earned the right to be citizens,” said new Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson.

The Daily Mail reports that Johnson called for “comprehensive, common sense, immigration reform” during his speech at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Washington D.C.

“An earned path to citizenship for those currently present in this country is a matter of, in my view, homeland security to encourage people to come out from the shadows,” Johnson said.

He added: “To offer the opportunity to those who want to be citizens, who’ve earned the right to be citizens, who are present in this country – many of whom came here as children – to have the opportunity that we all have to try to become American citizens.”

 

New York Times: New Homeland Security Head Jeh Johnson Needs to Fix Immigration Enforcement

New York Times 
Editorial

The Senate has confirmed Jeh Johnson, once the Pentagon’s top lawyer, to lead the Department of Homeland Security. Mr. Johnson brings a sharp legal mind and reputation for probity to the job. He will need both to manage the department, a daunting agglomeration of agencies and missions and chronic management problems.

Every year the Government Accountability Office publishes a “high-risk list” of federal agencies and departments that it considers “most in need of transformation.” Homeland security has appeared on that list, year after year, for failing to become “a single, cohesive and effective department that is greater than the sum of its parts.” It has many parts: 22 agencies were folded into homeland security in 2003; today the department has more than 240,000 employees handling terrorism prevention, disaster response, immigration (legal and illegal) and many other things. Staffing vacancies are high. Morale is low.

What most needs fixing is immigration enforcement. Under Mr. Johnson’s predecessors, the department’s continually shifting strategies against illegal immigration had two things in common. They were ineffective and cruel. The administration of George W. Bush specialized in high-profile deportations. In one notorious instance, the government professed itself shocked to find Hispanics without papers working in a meat plant in Iowa, so it swooped in and removed them, devastating scores of families and the town they lived in.

To read more click here.

Arizona Republic Editorial: Don’t think Border Patrol Impacts You? Arizona Republic Spells Out Reasons To Care

 
 
By Editorial Board 
The Arizona Republic

You might shrug off concerns about how the Border Patrol operates. After all, it’s just the border. Migrants. Smugglers. Lawbreakers.

It’s not about you and me.

Well, yes it is.

We hold police to high standards to protect everyone’s civil rights. Exempting the nation’s largest police force undermines decades of work to increase the professionalism of your local cops. What’s more, the lethal power of the Border Patrol is not limited to migrants and smugglers.

They’ve killed citizens, too.

A lack of transparency and accountability raises red flags about human rights and public safety.

It raises questions about the efficiency and effectiveness of an agency that has grown rapidly in recent years and would double in size under the Senate’s immigration reform plan.

To read more click here.

Columnist: A Little Sense Would Go Long Way for Immigration Issue

By Esther Cepeda
Anchorage Daily News

With the on-again, off-again chances of achieving wide-ranging immigration reform, there’s much to be exasperated about. But more frustrating are the smaller, slam-dunk situations that could be settled by other means.

Take the case of Sergio Garcia, who has a law degree and passed the bar exam in California but cannot practice because he is an unlawful immigrant. The state of California is pushing the envelope with a piece of controversial legislation that would allow Garcia to ply his trade even though he’s residing in the U.S. illegally.

A logic-defying law that would allow such immigrants to be admitted to the California Bar is sitting on Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk doing a few things: awaiting the governor’s signature, again challenging the federal government’s supremacy over the states on immigration issues, and antagonizing those who are already against any reform that includes a path to citizenship because it seems to reward those who have broken the law.

What’s needed in this case is not a divisive and ridiculous state-based loophole but a bare minimum of common sense.

Sen. McCain Says Border Patrol Doesn’t Need Additional 20,000 Agents

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Sen. John McCain, who is taking the lead on immigration reforms, said the Border Patrol doesn’t need an additional 20,000 agents, Politic365 reports.

What it needs, McCain said, is “use of technology that has been developed where we can survey the border more effectively.”

McCain spoke at an AFL-CIO immigration forum Wednesday.

The Senate in late June approved an immigration bill amendment that cost $40 billion, largely to hire the 20,000 agents.

It’s unclear whether McCain will be able to convince his colleagues that the bill is overkill.

Opinion: Reform Needed at Border Patrol Before More Die

 

By Joe Conason
Express Milwaukee.com
Immigration reform now seems certain to pass the U.S. Senate within days, in an amended bill that could win as many as 70 votes from both parties. The results will improve the lives of millions of undocumented workers and their families—but the costs will not be negligible, including a “surge” that will rapidly double the size of the U.S. Border Patrol to 40,000 agents, along with much more fencing and surveillance technology.

Those expensive “security enhancements” were included to satisfy or silence Republican complaints about the supposedly porous border, although that theme seemed to be more an excuse to oppose reform than a true issue. In fact, illegal border crossings have declined precipitously over the past few years while deportations have increased, and the number of arrests by the average Border Patrol agent has dropped from as many as 100 to only 19 annually.

So why do we need thousands of additional agents at the border? Evidently the manpower increase—along with the fencing and the high-tech surveillance gadgets that have never worked—is necessary so that legislators can proclaim their own toughness. But the consequences of swiftly bringing on such a huge influx of inexperienced personnel could prove deadly.

To read more click here.