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Tag: insane clown posse

Fans of Insane Clown Posse Rally Against FBI’s Classification of Them as ‘Gang’

A Juggalo/facebook

A Juggalo, via facebook

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

More than 1,000 fans of the rap duo Insane Clown Posse rallied in Washington D.C. on Saturday to protest the FBI’s classification of them as a gang.

The band’s fans, known as Juggalos, protested in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

The band filed suit against the Justice Department in an attempt to reverse the FBI’s designation of the fans as a gang. The lawsuit says the Juggalos as a peaceful community.

The FBI classified the group’s fans as a “loosely organized hybrid gang” in 2011.

Insane Clown Posse, Fans to Protest Group’s FBI Label As a Gang

Insane Clown Posse

Insane Clown Posse

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The rap duo Insane Clown Posse and their fans plan to protest the group’s FBI classification as a gang in Washington D.C. in September.

“As many of you are no doubt personally aware, the FBI’s inclusion of Juggalos as a ‘gang’ has resulted in hundreds if not thousands of people subjected to various forms of discrimination, harassment, and profiling simply for identifying as a Juggalo,” the group wrote in an online manifesto, the New York Daily News reports.

“Over the past five years, our legal team has heard testimonies and reports from Juggalos all over the nation who have lost custody of their children, been fired from jobs, denied access into the armed forces, and the most common consequence — being officially labeled as a gang member by law enforcement agencies for wearing Juggalo related clothing or brandishing one or more Juggalo tattoos.”

The FBI classified the group’s fans as a “loosely organized hybrid gang” in 2011.

“Juggalos utilize the symbol of a man running with hatchet, called the ‘Hatchetman,’ have their own hand signs, slang, an anthem, and a pledge of allegiance to the ICP and their ideas,” the report read. “The Juggalos follow the groups teachings which are imbedded in their lyrics, movies, album covers and websites.”

Insane Clown Posse Plans Rally Over FBI Labeling Fans as ‘Gang’

Insane Clown Posse

Insane Clown Posse

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

After the FBI called them a gang, the Insane Clown Posse and their “Juggalo” fans have furiously fought back against what they consider unfair character assassination.

The horror-rap duo is leading a march on Washington D.C. next year to protest the “gang” label.

“In 2017, the weekend of September 17th, we need you,” rapper Violent J told an audience at what The Detroit News described as a “seminar discussion” at the Gathering of the Juggalos. “We’re gonna do a [expletive] march on Washington. They call the Juggalo World a movement, right? Well, let’s move!”
The march is scheduled for Sept. 16 and will begin at the Lincoln Memorial and end at the Washington Monument.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen,” Violent J said. “We could totally embarrass ourselves, and there could be 25 people [who show up to protest].”

The FBI in 2011 described Juggalos as a “loosely organized hybrid gang.”

Insane Clown Posse Can’t Sue Government Over FBI Gang Report, Judge Rules

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The rap-metal duo Insane Clown Posse has lost its lawsuit against the feds.

U.S. District Judge Robert Cleland dismissed the group’s lawsuit against the FBI and Justice Department,  saying the government can’t be blamed for any fallout from a 2011 FBI report that classified fans of the group as a “loosely organized hybrid gang,”  the Associated Press reported. The fans are known as Juggalos.

The AP reported that the U.S. Justice Department is not responsible for how authorities use a national report on gangs.

Fans claimed they were unfairly targeted by local authorities because of the gang label.

FBI Urges Judge to Dismiss Lawsuit by Insane Clown Posse, Saying They Have No Right to Sue

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is urging a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by the rap duo Insane Clown Posse, claiming the have no right to sue the bureau over its decision to classify fans of the musicians as members of a “loosely organized hybrid gang,” the Guardian reports.

Lawyers for the federal government claim the bureau should not be held responsible for how local law enforcement used the FBI’s report on gangs, which included an assessment of the fans known as “Juggalos.”

The band is represented by the American Civil Liberties Union.

“The Juggalos are fighting for the basic American right to freely express who they are, to gather and share their appreciation of music, and to discuss issues that are important to them without fear of being unfairly targeted and harassed by police,” Michael Steinberg of the Michigan ACLU said when the case was brought. “Branding hundreds of thousands of music fans as gang members based on the acts of a few individuals defies logic and violates our most cherished of constitutional rights.”

The FBI argued that the FBI only labeled a “subset” of the fans a members of a criminal gang.

Boston Globe Editorial: FBI’s Designation of Clown Posse Fans As Gang Members is Clownish

By The Boston Globe
Editorial Page

Throughout their two decades on the charts, the hip hop duo Insane Clown Posse’s over-the-top theatrics and often violent lyrics have put off many listeners. The fact that many of their fans — who refer to themselves as Juggalos — show their devotion with clown makeup and elaborate tattoos has further cemented the duo’s status as musical outlaws.

But should they literally be regarded as outlaws? The FBI seems to think so. In 2011, its National Gang Intelligence Center categorized the Juggalos as a gang. It’s a loose designation that causes more confusion than clarity, and raises uncomfortable concerns about judging people by their musical tastes rather than their actions. The FBI should be able to fight crime by face-painted villains without tarnishing all the followers of the group.

On Jan. 8, the band, along with four self-proclaimed Juggalos and the American Civil Liberties Union, filed a lawsuit in federal court contesting the designation. According to the complaint, being erroneously labeled a gang member has led to Juggalos with no criminal records being harassed by the police. Individual plaintiffs describe being subjected to traffic stops due to their tattoos or Insane Clown Posse bumper stickers or shirts.

To read more click here.

Michigan Rap Group, Insane Clown Posse, Sues FBI over Designating Fans as Criminal Gang Members

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Saying the FBI has unfairly targeted fans of a Michigan rap group as criminal gang members, attorneys for Insane Clown Posse filed suit against the bureau Wednesday, the New York Times reports.

The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Detroit claims the gang designation was unwarranted and has lead to harassment by law enforcement.

Four of the fans, known as Juggalos, also filed suit, saying they were unfairly targeted because of the music they like.

One of them, Brandon Bradley, of California, said he was pulled over by police several times because of his Juggalo tattoos and clothing.

“I’m a peaceful person and I try to live my life right,” he said.

The FBI declined to comment on the lawsuit, but in the past said Juggalos have a history of violence.

FBI: Fans of Detroit-Based Rap Group Belong to Hybrid Gang

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

DETROIT — The headline on the U.S. Marshal’s press release announced, “Gang Member Removed from New Mexico’s Most Wanted.”

Turns out, 20-year-old Mark Anthony Carlson was wanted for missing probation. And oh yes, more importantly, he is a “Juggalo,” a fan of the Detroit-based rap group, Insane Clown Posse, reports the Village Voice.

And according to the FBI’s 2011 National Gang Threat Assessment, Juggalos are a “criminal organization formed on the street,” lumping them with Crips and Bloods.

“Because of their multiple affiliations, ethnicities, migratory nature, and nebulous structure, hybrid gangs are difficult to track, identify, and target as they are transient and continuously evolving,” the FBI report reads.

The Village Voice noted in its story about the Juggalo:

Initially, this seemed amusingly ludicrous, another example of a federal agency looking foolish for its cultural ineptitude. “The FBI has recently had difficulty distinguishing ordinary American Muslims from terrorists,” wrote Wired’s Spencer Ackerman, who first wrote about the FBI’s Juggalo gang-list inclusion. “Now it appears it has a similar problem distinguishing teenage fads from criminal conspiracies.” Except that a seemingly silly judgment tucked away in a federal document is beginning to have tangible consequences.