Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2019
S M T W T F S
« May    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: joint terrorism task force

FBI Task Force Nabs Suspect Accused of Plotting Times Square Attack

Times Square, via Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

The FBI and local police nabbed a man they believe was plotting to detonate explosives in Times Square.

The Joint Terrorism Task Force took the suspect into custody Thursday after setting up a sting to catch him buying weapons CBS 2 reports.

Authorities believe the suspect was acting alone and not planning another attack.

The suspect, who has not yet been identified, is set to appear in federal court in Brooklyn on Friday.

Authorities have not yet indicated a motive.

Terrorism Threats in Alabama? It Can Happen Anywhere in Age of ISIS

ISIS flag

ISIS flag

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The attack on a military camp in Chattanooga was a stark reminder that not even America’s rural areas are safe from terrorist attacks.

It’s why every FBI field office nationwide has a joint terrorism task force, reports ABC 30.

To combat the threat in Alabama, Chris Hoffman, Supervisory Special Agent for the Birmingham Field Office, said no place in America is immune to an attack, and it takes vigilance to monitor and prevent an atrocity.

“The threat of terrorism is growing in the homeland, it’s an unfortunate time, but it’s a fact,” Hoffman said.

“There are ISIS investigations in every state in the United States,” Hoffman said. “Alabama has been touched by that, there’s been recent news stories about persons who have traveled from Alabama, females particularly to Syria. We also have domestic terrorism events. We have a long history here unfortunately.”

For more information on the Joint Terrorism Task Force, click here. 

The FBI’s New Special Agent in Charge in Oregon Takes Helm Monday

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Gregory T. Bretzing, a former accountant who joined the FBI in 1995, will take the helm at the FBI’s Oregon office on Monday.

Bretzing will become special agent in charge after serving as inspector at the bureau’s Washington D.C. headquarters for the past 18 months.

Bretzing, 47, also supervised a joint terrorism task force in Salt Lake City.

Bretzing has five children.

FBI Names New Special Agent in Charge of Detroit Office

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Detroit’s FBI division has a new leader.

Paul M. Abbate, who has a background in counterterrorism, will replace Robert Foley, who announced plans to step down in August after a year on the job. The appointment was first reported by ticklethewire.com and Deadline Detroit.

Fox 2 reports that Abbate most recently was a special agent heading up the Counterterrorism Division in the Washington Field Office, where he supervised the Joint Terrorism Task Force.

Abbate’s career began in 1996. Since then, he’s worked in Afghanistan, Iraq, New York, Los Angeles and New Jersey, Fox 2 reported.

 

FBI Terrorism Sting in Houston Ends in Conviction

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Barry Walter Bojul’s trip to Yemen has been detoured, possibly by as much as 20 years in a federal prison.

The 30-year-old Texan’s  conviction in a Houston federal court on Monday was the culmination of an investigation that began in 2009 by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force. He was convicted of providing support to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP).

Bojul acted as his own attorney.

In 2009, law enforcement thwarted three attempts of Bujol’s to leave the US for the Middle East, fearful he was planning to commit a violent jihad. Concerned, FBI agents arranged for Bujol to meet a confidential informant, who posed as  a recruiter for al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.  Bujol later told  the informant he wanted to fight with the mujahideen.

It was established at the trial that Bujol had been in contact with the late Yemeni-American al-Qaeda associate Anwar Al-Aulaqi. In response to Bujol’s questions of how to support jihad, Aulaqi sent a letter entitled “42 Ways of Supporting Jihad,” which advocated violence and killing.

The confidential informant contacted Bujol on May 30, 2010, with a previously agreed upon codeword signaling the beginning of Bujol’s travels to the Middle East to join AQAP. They drove to the Port of Houston together where Bujol thought he was boarding a ship as a stow-away bound for training in Algeria then fighting in Yemen.

“Minutes after stowing away in a room on board the ship, agents took him into custody without incident,” according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office press release.

Bujol faces up to 15 years for attempting to provide material support to a designated terrorist organization and another five years for identity theft charges related to a fake ID Bujol had made to gain access to the port. He also faces fines of up to $250,000.

He has been in federal custody since the May 30, 2010 arrest, where he will remain until sentencing.

Like Portland, San Francisco Police Place Limits on Officers Who Participate in FBI’s JTTF

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The San Francisco Police Department becomes the second major police force in the nation in recent months to place limits on what its officers can do as members of  the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

Following Portland, Oregon’s lead, the San Francisco Chronicle reports that the San Francisco police chief Greg Suhr has issued an order that says cops assigned to the FBI’s terrorism task force must adhere to local policies protecting civil rights rather than the federal rules, which are looser.

“His announcement came during a rare joint meeting of the San Francisco police and human rights commissions, which was called after the American Civil Liberties Union, along with groups representing Arab Americans and other minorities, raised concerns that local police officers who served on the task force fell under FBI control and therefore operated under federal laws that gave them more leeway in terrorism investigations,” the Chronicle reported.

“No one wants SFPD officers to be under control of the FBI,” John Crew, a lawyer with the ACLU, said , according to the Chronicle.  “We’re all on the same page about that. But we’re not there yet with making it happen.”

In April, the Portland City Council voted unanimously to rejoin the FBI’s JTTF, but with limits. The city had quit the JTTF in 2005, citing concerns that the FBI was violating civil rights. It was also concerned its officers might snoop on citizens and violate local laws. Then-police chief and mayor were also angry that they did not have access to the same classified information task force officers had.

Under Portland’s new arrangement, the department will not permanently assign manpower to the JTTF, but will get involved with the anti-terrorism task force on an “as-needed basis” when it deemed the investigations worthy, The Oregonian reported.

Under the plan, the police chief will have the discretion to assign officers to investigations after consulting with the police commissioner. Some community members were adamantly against the city having a relationship with the JTTF.

Portland revisited the issue of participating in the JTTF after the FBI set up a sting and busted a man last November who was plotting to detonate a bomb at a Christmas tree lighting ceremony in Portland.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI Steps Up Nationwide Hunt for Man Suspected of Trying to Bomb Colo. Mall

Earl Albert Moore/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI on Sunday stepped up its nationwide hunt for a 65-year-old, tattooed man suspected of  placing a crude bomb at  the Southeast Plaza Mall in Jefferson County, Colo. last Wednesday. The bomb never detonated.

The Denver Joint Terrorism Task Force released five additional photographs of suspect Earl Albert Moore, who the FBI described as being 200-225 lbs, 6’0” – 6’2”, gray mustache and multiple tattoos.

The FBI requested that he media distribute the new photos.

Authorities found a pipe bomb and two propane tanks in the stairwell of  the mall.

The Denver Post reported that Moore had been released from prison a week before the incident. He was serving time for bank robbery.

The bomb was planted on the anniversary of the Columbine High School shootings.