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Tag: Juarez

Gang Leader Gets Life Sentence in U.S. Consulate Murders

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Arturo Gallegos Castrellon, the Barrio Azteca Lieutenant who ordered the March 2010 murders of a U.S. Consulate employee, her husband and the husband of another U.S. Consulate employee in Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, was sentenced Thursday to life in prison in federal court in El Paso.

“The DEA is committed to ensuring cold-blooded criminals, like Arturo Gallegos Castrellon, who murder innocent victims, traffic huge amounts of drugs worldwide, and incite violence are taken off the street and remain behind bars,” DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart said in a statement. “Castrellon’s conviction and life sentence is a clear sign that the DEA, along with our law enforcement partners, will not tolerate those who attack Americans abroad and is committed to upholding the rule of law, protecting our citizens, and bringing to justice the world’s worst criminals.”

“Arturo Gallegos Castrellon led the teams of assassins who carried out the U.S. Consulate shootings in March 2010 and ruthlessly murdered nearly 1,600 others as part of a cartel conflict over a drug trafficking route from Mexico into the United States,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General O’Neil in a statement. “His gang of killers terrorized and victimized men and women on both sides of the border, but thanks to the hard work of our law enforcement partners he will now spend the rest of his life in prison for his crimes.”

In addition to the sentence,  U.S. District Judge Kathleen Cardone ordered Gallegos Castrellon to pay $998,840 in restitution and $785,500 in forfeiture.

A  federal jury found Gallegos Castrellon guilty of six counts of murder and conspiracies to commit racketeering, narcotics trafficking, narcotics importation, murder in a foreign country and money laundering.

 

Cartel Leader Involved in U.S. Consulate Killings Gets Life

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The Juarez Drug Cartel’s leader in Juarez and Chihuahua, Mexico, pleaded guilty Thursday in El Paso, Texas, and was sentenced to life in prison for his role in drug-trafficking and numerous acts of violence including the deaths of three people tied to the the U.S. Consulate in Mexico, the Justice Department said.

Jose Antonio Acosta-Hernandez, 34, aka “Diego,” “Dienton,” “Diez” and “Bablazo,” of Chihuahua, was extradited to the United States from Mexico on March 16. He pleaded guilty to four counts of racketeering, narcotics trafficking and money laundering.

He also pleaded also pleaded guilty to seven counts of murder and weapons charges, which specifically related to the March 13, 2010, triple homicide in Juarez of U.S. Consulate employee Leslie Enriquez, her husband Arthur Redelfs and Jorge Salcido Ceniceros, the husband of another U.S. Consulate employee.

Immediately after entering his plea, he was sentenced to to seven concurrent life terms, three additional consecutive life terms and 20 years in federal prison.

“As the leader of La Linea’s enforcement wing, Mr. Acosta-Hernandez directed a reign of terror,” Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said in a statement. “Today’s guilty plea and sentence are a significant step in our effort to bring to justice those responsible for the consulate murders, and it would not have been possible without the extraordinary assistance of our law enforcement partners in Mexico, including Attorney General Marisela Morales Ibáñez.

Washington Post Editorial: Mexico’s Massacres- U.S. Needs to Do More

The Washington Post
Editorial Page

WASHINGTON — TIJUANA, one of Mexico’s violence-racked border cities, was supposed to be getting better. A drug kingpin notorious for dissolving his enemies in acid was arrested; a record cache of 134 tons of marijuana was seized and burned.

President Felipe Calderon said the city was a “clear example that the security challenge has a solution.” Then came the massacre. On Oct. 24, gunmen attacked a drug rehabilitation center, slaughtering 13 men. That brought this year’s death toll to 639 in a city of 1.5 million.

The mass slaying was one of three recorded in Mexico in just five days. On Oct. 22, a gang attacked a teenager’s birthday party in Ciudad Juarez, killing 14; the youngest was a 13-year-old girl. On Oct. 27, shooters appeared at a carwash in the Pacific state of Nayarit, where clients of a drug rehabilitation center were working. Some of the workers were wearing T-shirts bearing the words “Faith and Hope.” At least 15 were killed.

The larger message here is that Mexico is still embroiled in a desperate fight to save its liberal democracy.

To read more click here.

FBI and ATF Join Car Bomb Probe in Mexico Allegedly Involving Drug Cartel in Border Town

mexico-border-signBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI and ATF have joined the probe in Mexico into a July 15 car bomb in the border town of Juarez that killed three people, the El Paso Times reported. The bomb, made of  C-4 plastic, was detonated by cell phone.

It was the first time drug cartels had used a car bomb in Mexico, a disturbing sign in a drug war that appears to be only getting worse.

“The FBI sent a small team to the crime scene to consult with our Mexican counterparts and we have offered them technical assistance with the car bombing,” El Paso FBI Special Agent Andrea Simmons said Sunday, according to the the paper. “We would only be involved if the Mexican government asked for our assistance in some way.”

ATF spokesman Tom Crowley in Dallas said his agency was also assisting, the El Paso Times reported.

“The ATF is providing Mexican officials with help on the technical aspects of the bomb,” Crowley told the paper. “We have provided post-blast training to Mexican law enforcement in the past. It is the same kind of training we give to state and local police in the United States.

“Post-blast involves reconstructing the device used in the explosion so investigators can determine what it was and where it might have come from.”

The paper reported that Mexican authorities said the bombing was the result of officials arresting a lieutenant in the Carrillo Fuentes drug cartel.

To read more click here.

Mayor of Juarez on Mexico’s Border Hates The Drug Cartels; They Want Him Dead