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Tag: judge

Trump’s Crackdown on Immigration Is Straining Already Backlogged Immigration Cases

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

New federal immigration rules under President Trump are placing a heavy burden on Border Patrol agents, judges, prosecutors and defense attorneys who already had been swamped.

The USA Today reports that Trump’s crackdown on illegal immigration, which gives agents more leverage to deport undocumented immigrants, has been strain on “an immigration court system already juggling more than a half-million cases and ill-equipped to take on thousands more.”

“We’re at critical mass,” said Linda Brandmiller, a San Antonio immigration attorney who works with juveniles. “There isn’t an empty courtroom. We don’t have enough judges. You can say you’re going to prosecute more people, but from a practical perspective, how do you make that happen?”

The number of backlogged immigration cases have increased from 236,415 in 2010 to 508,036 this year, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, a data research group at Syracuse University. 

The Border Patrol also is understaffed and having trouble hiring enough agents.

Other Stories of Interest

Judge Fatally Shot Outside Chicago Home; FBI Offers $25,000 Reward

Cook County Associate Judge Raymond Myles

Cook County Associate Judge Raymond Myles

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is offering a $25,000 reward for the information leading to the arrest of the gunman who shot and killed a judge outside his Chicago home.

Cook County Associate Judge Raymond Myles, 66, was fatally shot while heading to the gym, police told Fox News. 

A 53-year-old woman who was with the judge was shot in the leg and expected to survive. Police believe the woman was the judge’s girlfriend.

According to the woman, she was shot by a man holding a gun near the garage of Myles’ home. When Myles heard the gunshot, he went outside and exchanged words with the gunman, who shot the judge several times.

Authorities believe the motive may have been robbery.

Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi, Myles also “may have been targeted for one reason or another.”

Judge Tentatively Approves $1M Settlement to Children in Border Patrol Lawsuit

Anastasio Hernandez Rojas.

Anastasio Hernandez Rojas.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Seven years of litigation may finally be over after a San Diego federal judge tentatively approved a $1 million settlement to the children of a Mexican man who was fatally beaten and shot with a Taser at a California port of entry.

The money will be split by the five children of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas, who was killed during the confrontation at the San Ysidro Port of Entry on May 28, 2010, The San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

“This agreement is not justice,” said Hernandez Rojas’ common-law wife, Maria Puga, at a news conference following the hearing. “My husband’s life does not have a price. The decision had to be taken and it was difficult. We had to turn the page.”

Two of the children are still minors.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Louisa Porter told the two 10-year-olds that he delayed signing the final order under to ensure the funds don’t need to go through probate.

“I hope you use the funds so you can have a good life going forward,” Porter told the two 10-year-olds. “He came to this country to improve his life, and he’d like to see your lives improved by virtue of all the sacrifices he made for you.”

Judge Rejects New York Mafia Informant’s Lawsuit Against FBI

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Joseph Barone was a former Mafia informant for the FBI when he spent 19 months in a Brooklyn prison before a federal jury acquitted him in 2010.

Barone, now 55, sued the FBI, saying the bureau wanted to discipline him for refusing to trick a gangster from the Gambino crime family into confessing criminal activity, Reuters reports.

But on Monday, a New York judge ruled against Barone, saying there wasn’t enough evidence to provide that agents conspired to discipline him by charging him with a crime he didn’t commit.

Barone was accused of participating in a murder-for-hire plot.

Judge Andrew J. Peck ruled that the FBI did nothing wrong and had probable cause to arrest Barone.

Judge Rips FBI for Failing to Record 6-Hour Interrogation of Terror Suspect

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI interrogated an Everett terror suspect for six hours without recording the interaction.

That didn’t sit well with U.S. District Court Judge William G. Young, who criticized the FBI during a day-long evidentiary hearing Thursday, the Boston Herald reports. 

“It would have been a very good idea if all this had been recorded,” Young said. “A recording device that is reliable ought to be part of their kit.”

The suspect, David Daoud Wright, was charged with conspiring to provide material support to a terrorist organization for allegedly plotting to behead a conservative blogger with Boston terror suspect Usaamah Rahim.

FBI Boston Special Agent David George said the interrogation wan’t recorded because “We were in his living room. We weren’t in the right environment for it … We were not properly equipped,” noting that the bureau prohibits using cell phones to record interviews.

Mississippi Man Who Tried to Join ISIS Credits FBI for Saving His Life

ISIS flag

ISIS flag

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Mississippi man thanked the FBI for saving his life as he was sentenced to eight years in prison Wednesday for trying to join ISIS.

Muhammad Dakhlalla told a federal judge that he didn’t know at the time what ISIS represented, the Associated Press reports. 

The 22-year-old pleaded guilty in March to one count of conspiring to provide material support to a terrorist organization.

Dakhlalla said he watched Internet videos with his former fiancee, Jaelyn Young, and videos depicted ISIS members helping people in Syria and Iraq. While jailed, he said he learned about ISIS’ violence after watching TV news coverage of the terrorist organization.

“I was completely wrong about what ISIS was,” Dakhlalla told U.S. District Judge Sharion Aycock. “I’ve come to the conclusion that they’re really sick and twisted. They twist Islam for their own agenda. I denounce them. I condemn them.”

His former fiancee, Young, was sentenced to 12 years in prison earlier this month.

Sex Offender Gets 70 Years in Prison on Numerous Charges

police tapeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A federal judge wants to make sure 39-year-old Bradley Prucha spends the rest of his life in prison.

The 39-year-old registered sex offender with a long criminal history was sentenced to 70 years in prison.

Prucha was charged and convicted of producing child pornography, acting as the ringleader of a multi-state retail theft scheme, distributing narcotics to minors and witness tampering.

“This man left a tremendous wake of victims and broken lives behind him,” said Special Agent Kevin Kohler, who investigated the case from the FBI’s Omaha Division. “He is a predator in every sense of the word.”

The FBI said Prucha relied to vulnerable teenage girls to help carry out the crimes. He also paid to have sex with them and even filmed himself having sexual encounters with minors.

“For the most part, these were vulnerable teenage girls who didn’t have stable home lives,” Kohler said. “Prucha was able to recruit them by taking them on trips and buying them gifts and pretending to care about them when no one else in their lives did.”

Other Stories of Interest

Former Judge: A Lot of Unanswered Questions Remain in Hillary Clinton Case

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton

Andrew P. Napolitano
for Washington Times

What if the folks who run the Department of Political Justice recently were told that the republic would suffer if Hillary Clinton were indicted for espionage because Donald Trump might succeed Barack Obama in the presidency? What if espionage is the failure to safeguard state secrets and the evidence that Mrs. Clinton failed to safeguard them is unambiguous and overwhelming?

What if President Obama never really liked his former rival whom he appointed as his secretary of state? What if he had no real interest in seeing her succeed him because he and his wife simply could never trust her?

What if, when Mrs. Clinton suggested to the president that the United States wage a secret, undeclared war against Libya, the president went along with it as a no-lose proposition? What if he assumed that if her secret war succeeded he’d get the credit, and if her secret war failed she would get the blame?

What if the means of fighting the secret war consisted of employing intelligence assets rather than the U.S. military? What if Mrs. Clinton concocted that idea because the use of the military requires a public reporting to the entire Congress but the use of intelligence assets requires only a secret reporting to a dozen members of Congress?

What if Mrs. Clinton expanded her war by permitting American and foreign arms dealers to bypass the NATO arms embargo on Libya by selling heavy-duty, military-grade arms directly to militias in Libya? What if this was Mrs. Clinton’s dream scenario — an apparent civil war in Libya in which the victorious side was secretly armed by the United States, with democracy brought to the country and Mrs. Clinton the architect of it all?

Andrew P. Napolitano, a former judge of the Superior Court of New Jersey, is a contributor to The Washington Times. He is the author of seven books on the U.S. Constitution.

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