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Tag: Minneapolis

FBI Investigates Deadly Police Shooting in Minneapolis After It’s Ruled a Homicide

police lightsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A deadly Minneapolis police shooting over the weekend that set off angry protests will be investigated by the FBI, the Los Angeles Times reports.

A scuffle between police and Jamar Clark, 24, ended with an officer shot him in the head.

The county medical examiner has ruled the shooting a homicide.

Protesters claim that Clark was shot while in handcuffs, but police dispute that.

The incident happened after Clark was suspected of assaulting an unidentified woman. He’s accused of interfering with paramedics who were treating the alleged victim.

FBI Arrests 6 in Minneapolis, San Diego in Connection with Terrorism Probe

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An FBI terrorism investigation netted six arrests in Minneapolis and San Diego on Sunday.

Information was murky early Monday, but a press conference later in the day is expected to shed light on the charges and allegations.

“There is no threat to public safety,” Ben Petok, spokesman for U.S. Attorney Andy Luger, told the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Among those arrested were members of Minneapolis’ sizable Somali population.

“The community is in a state of confusion,” Jamal said Sunday night. “They don’t know what is going on. … This is a very serious issue. We as a community are concerned about losing our kids to [ISIL].”

Minneapolis FBI Refused to Use Somali Outreach Program to Spy on Groups

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI office deserves kudos for doing the right thing.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that the FBI directed agents in Minneapolis and five other U.S. cities in 2009 to use community outreach with Somali groups as cover to gather intelligence on terrorist recruiting efforts and on individuals who would likely be vulnerable to being radicalized.

But the paper reports that the Minneapolis field office refused from the start to follow the spying directive, which had been approved by then-FBI Director Robert Mueller.

“We never followed it because at the time we believed our brand of community outreach would engender the trust we’d built up here,” said Kyle Loven, the FBI’s spokesman in Minneapolis, according to the paper. “We took great care to make sure our outreach specialists were not involved in any investigations.”

To read more click here.

In December 2010, the Obama administration halted the spy operation against Somalis be stopped immediately, the paper reported.

Homeland Security Spied on Occupy Wall Street Protests in about a Dozen U.S. Cities

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A division of the Department of Homeland Security spied and kept records on the Occupy Wall Street protests, even when they were peaceful the Huffington Post reports.

More than 250 records obtained by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund show the federal government was keeping close tabs on protesters.

“Taken together, the two sets of documents paint a disturbing picture of federal law enforcement agencies using their vast power in a systematic effort to surveil and disrupt peaceful demonstrations,” Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, executive director of the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, said in a statement. “The federal agencies’ actions were not because Occupy represented a ‘terrorist threat’ or a ‘criminal threat,’ but rather because it posed a significant grassroots political challenge to the status quo.”

The department was watching demonstrations in Philadelphia, New York City, Chicago, Denver, Boston, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis and Tampa, Fla.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Don Oswald Hanging Up the Gun and Badge as Head of FBI in Minn.

Donald Oswald/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

It’s adios for Don Oswald after a short stint as head of the FBI in Minneapolis.

Oswald ,53, tells the Associated Press that he’s retiring to practice practice law. He eventually wants to become a judge. He was assigned to the job last May.

“I really would like to pursue that other career option, so I made a personal decision that I was going to close the bureau chapter and move on,” Oswald said. “I don’t know how it will unfold.”

The office covers Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Oswald joined the FBI in 1992 and first served in the Los Angeles Division where he investigated bank robberies and street gang activities and also served as a division legal adviser, the FBI said.

Two years later, he was off to new York, where he investigated complex multi-agency public corruption cases. He also served for more than three years as associate division counsel in the New York Division.

Read more »

Minneapolis FBI Moves to the Burbs

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The Minnesota FBI, which also covers North and South Dakota, has moved.

The Associated Press reports that the office has moved from downtown Minneapolis to a standalone facility in the suburb of Brooklyn Center, just northwest of the city.

Features of the new facility include bulletproof glass and blast-proof walls.

 

New Home For Phoenix FBI Opens

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The Phoenix FBI has a new home.

A 210,202-square-foot building on N. Seventh Street officially opened Wednesday, the Phoenix Business Journal reported. It was built by Ryan Cos., a Minneapolis-based company.

The paper reported that the building consolidates four previous Phoenix FBI locations.

“With more than double the previous space, the Phoenix employees will benefit from a large stand-alone FBI field office, with many improvements to include tighter security and upgraded technology,” said James Turgal Jr., FBI Special Agent-In-Charge, Phoenix Division, according to the paper.

 

New Acting ATF Director Todd Jones No Stranger to Fed Law Enforcement; Considered Pro ATF

U.S. Atty. Jones, new acting ATF Dir.

 By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The new acting director of ATF, B. Todd Jones, is no stranger to federal law enforcement.

In fact Jones is on his second go around as U.S. Attorney in Minnesota.

Jones, who will remain the U.S. Attorney in Minnesota while serving as acting head of ATF, was first appointed to the U.S. Attorney job by President Clinton in 1998. He remained on the job until January 2001.  He was again nominated in 2009, this time by President Obama, and was confirmed in August of that year.

One ATF agent on Tuesday told ticklethewire.com that Jones has a reputation as being pro-ATF, an issue that’s of obvious concern to agents.

After leaving the U.S. Attorney post in 2001, Jones went on to work as a partner with a major national law firm in Minneapolis, Robins, Kaplan, Miller and Ciresi,, where he focused on complex business litigation. He represented a number of organizations and individuals in both criminal and civil regulatory matters.

President Obama nominated him in 2009 as the U.S. Attorney and he was confirmed by the Senate in August of that year.

After taking office, Attorney Gen. Eric Holder Jr. appointed Jones to serve as Chair of the Attorney General Advisory Committee (AGAC), a body that consists of 18 U. S. Attorneys. The committee is responsible for advising the Attorney General on a broad array of Department of Justice policy issues.

Jones earned his law degree from  the University of Minnesota Law School in 1983.  After being accepted by the Minnesota bar, he went on active duty in the United States Marine Corps, where he served as both a trial defense counsel and prosecutor in a number of courts martial proceedings.

In 1989, he and his family returned to Minnesota, where he developed a civil litigation practice encompassing a wide variety of legal matters, ranging from products liability defense and insurance coverage disputes to environmental and labor and employment controversies in both a private and public sector setting.

A  Sept. 19, 2009 story in the Minneapolis Tribune, reported that Jones, as a Marines Corps office, was recalled to active duty in 1991 during the Persian Gulf War, where he learned lesson on juggling multiple responsibilities of national security, law enforcement and justice.

“I learned the importance of focus, of working as a team,” he told the paper.

“Everything cannot be a priority,” he was quoted as saying. “Or nothing is a priority.”