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Tag: Morale

Homeland Security Chief Expresses Disappointment with Low Moral in Agency

homeland2department-of-homeland-security-logo-300x300By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

No matter what Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson does to boost morale, his agency continues to rank last in this year’s Best Places to Work in the Federal Government survey.

For the fourth year in a row, employees of Homeland Security were collectively unhappier than employees at the 19 largest federal agencies.

The Washington Post reports that Johnson has tried to improve employee training fairness in hiring and promotions, but that hasn’t been enough.

Less than a third of Homeland Security employees expressed confidence in leadership in this year’s survey, and 43.1% consider DHS a good place to work.

Johnson wrote an email to his 240,000 employees, expressing his frustrations with the rankings.

“I’m disappointed,” he wrote. “We know improving employee satisfaction takes time, and we will not give up. We have an aggressive plan to do this.”

Next Secret Service Director Will Face Herculean Task to Raise Morale, Improve Protection

Secret Service photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Whoever takes over the embattled Secret Service will face an insurmountable task.

They must handle plunging morale, a tarnished reputation, budget holes and plenty of blunders that led to the resignation of Director Julia Pierson, the Wall Street Journal reports.

How disgruntled are employees? A 2013 survey found that Secret Service agents had the lowest employee job satisfaction in a decade.

And now there are elected officials who want to change how the Secret Service operates.

“Long term, we must consider restructuring the Secret Service’s mission,” said Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who has emerged as one of the agency’s most vocal critics in recent days.

From 2010 to 2014, the number of people who protect the president and others fell from 3,800 to 3,533.

Now Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is considering appointing an outsider to operate the Secret Service.

The problems are numerous, said Jon Adler, the president of Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association, a group whose members include Secret Service agents.

“You don’t have the current training, you have an overworked, tired overextended workforce and it’s going to factor into response time,” he said. “If the agency is properly funded, properly staffed and properly trained, those things in conjunction with the right protocols, then the system works,” he added.

Employees: Byzantine Oversight of Homeland Security is Crushing Morale, Hindering Work

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Homeland Security has so much congressional oversight that it’s damaging morale and making the work more difficult, the Washington Post reports.

Consider the number of committees and subcommittees that oversee DHS – more than 90, which exceeds the number that has jurisdiction over the Defense Department by nearly three fold.

“It makes no sense at all,” said Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), a homeland security committee member, who attributed the structure to a “petty fight for power” between committees reluctant to give up their piece of DHS.

When the department was created in 2002, 22 autonomous federal agencies were combined.

“It makes it very difficult for the department,’’ said King, who sees “no movement” in Congress to change the situation. “The amount of time that goes into preparing for a congressional hearing is immense. It’s like this hydra-headed monster they have to deal with.’’

Survey: Homeland Security Continues to Be One Miserable Place to Work

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

If the surveys are true, the Homeland Security Department can be a miserable place to work.

Morale at the department plummeted at a greater rate than the rest of the government, according to a new survey by the Office of Personnel Management, Fierce Homeland Security reports.

While worker satisfaction declined steadily across all federal agencies over the past three years, the decline was much steeper at Homeland Security, which routinely ranks among lowest in worker morale.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST


ATF Tries to Boost Low Morale By Building Store at Washington D.C. Headquarters

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

It’s no secret that ATF employees are struggling with morale problems.

In hopes of turning around that morale, the federal government is opening a store inside ATF headquarters in Washington D.C., Townhall reports.

“Currently the Office of the Director is in the process of coordinating the opening of an ATF store, which will be located in ATF HQ,” ATF Chief of Strategic Management Ron Humphries wrote in an email to employees on October 28, 2013. “The mission of the store is to serve current and former employees of ATF, Task Force Officers, and family members by promoting the general welfare and morale of the employees of ATF by providing, encouraging and supporting social, educational, and recreational activities of interest to its employees. In the coming weeks, more information will follow about the ATF HQ store.”

It’s unclear exactly what would be sold in the store.

Not everyone is sold on the idea.

“At a time when our Bureau is plagued by years of mismanagement, lack of oversight and abuses directed at its agents, it’s very disheartening to the field that headquarter priorities have nothing to do with correcting the broken policies and practices or even relate to strengthening our mission capability,” ATF Special Agent and whistleblower Vince Cefalu told Townhall. “The best they can come up with is selling ATF SWAG. For a Bureau suffering such huge divisions between the field and management, this does nothing to rebuild confidence in our leadership by either the agents or the American public.”

Homeland Security Department Ranked Most Unsatisfying Workplace Among Federal Agencies

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Working has its drawbacks for anyone.

But among federal agencies, the Department of Homeland Security was ranked the most unsatisfying workplace, U.S. News reports.

The survey, “The Best Places to Work in the Federal Government,” ranked DHS last for effective leadership, teamwork, support for diversity and training and development, U.S. News wrote.

DHS employs 240,000 people.

Where was the best place to work? The National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Seems exploring space leads to a better work environment than chasing terrorists, the U.S. News reported.