Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

August 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Patrick Gray

On This Day in 1973: FBI Chief Patrick Gray Quits in Wake of Watergate Scandal

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Patrick Gray was the acting head of the FBI when he was pressured to resign on April 28, 1973, in the wake of the President Nixon Watergate scandal, the Guardian reports.

Gray’s resignation came after news that he had burned incriminating documents tied to convicted Watergate conspirator Howard Hunt.
Gray was in line to succeed J. Edgar Hoover.

Despite the allegations, he claimed he did nothing wrong and was leaving for the sake of “the reputation, the integrity and the effectiveness of the FBI.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

Two Ex-N.Y. Times Journalists Said They Had Watergate Scandal Tip First; Former FBI Dir. Patrick Gray Cited as Source

L. Patrick Gray/fbi photo

L. Patrick Gray/fbi photo

It’s interesting to see that decades later we’re still learning about FBI leaks in the Watergate case, a story that gave journalism new direction and ushered in an era of great investigative reporting.

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA
New York Times

The Watergate break-in eventually forced a presidential resignation and turned two Washington Post reporters into pop-culture heroes.

But almost 37 years after the break-in, two former New York Times journalists have stepped forward to say that The Times had the scandal nearly in its grasp before The Post did – and let it slip.

Robert M. Smith, a former Times reporter, says that two months after the burglary, over lunch at a Washington restaurant, the acting director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, L. Patrick Gray, disclosed explosive aspects of the case, including the culpability of the former attorney general, John Mitchell, and hinted at White House involvement.

Mr. Smith rushed back to The Times’s bureau in Washington to repeat the story to Robert H. Phelps, an editor there, who took notes and tape-recorded the conversation, according to both men. But then Mr. Smith had to hand off the story – he had quit The Times and was leaving town the next day to attend Yale Law School.

Mr. Smith kept the events to himself for more than three decades, but decided to go public after learning that Mr. Phelps planned to include it in his memoir.

For Full Story