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Tag: President Ford

President Ford Approved Warrantless Wiretaps in 1974

President Ford/whitehouse photo

President Ford/whitehouse photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — President Gerald Fold authorized the FBI to use domestic warrantless wiretaps in 1974, according to the website WIRED.

The website, which cites a classified memo recently obtained by the Center for Investigative Reporting, says Ford signed a Dec. 19, 1974 memo giving his approval  “just one month before the Senate established an 11-member panel, known as the Church Committee, to investigate government surveillance programs.”

It said he had reviewed the matter and found it was legal. The signing came at a time critics were up in arms over what they considered excessive government surveillance on the domestic front.

“The Church Committee would ultimately uncover other unconstitutional spying activities, such as that conducted by the National Security Agency under the rubric of Operation Shamrock,” WIRED wrote. “Two days after the memo was signed, investigative reporter Seymour Hersh, writing in The New York Times, disclosed a covert government spying program that focused on monitoring political activists in the U.S.”

The website said Ford later supported the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, which required permission from a special court so law enforcement  could conduct domestic surveillance.

The news of Ford’s memo comes after a federal judge in San Francisco ruled last week that the National Security Agency illegally wiretapped conversations of two lawyers and a Saudi charity during the Bush years.

To read more click here.

Read Ford Memo

Retired Secret Service Agent James Parker Who Guarded Pres. Ford During 2 Assassination Attempts Dies at Age 70

Parker Protected Pres. Ford/pres. library photo
Parker Protected Pres. Ford/pres. library photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — James L. “Lee” Parker, a 34-year veteran of the U.S. Secret Service, who worked on presidential details including ones where attempts were made on President Ford’s life, died last month in Virginia at age 70, the Washington Post reported.

The paper reported that he died of brain cancer at the Fairfax Nursing Center in suburban Washington. He had been with the Secret Service from 1965 to 1999.

Parker worked for the Alexandria, Va. police and for the CIA before joining the Secret Service, the Post reported.

At one point in his career, in the 1990s, he headed the global counterfeit division at Interpol in Lyon, France, the Post reported.

He also served on the detail of President Ford “when Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme and, later, Sara Jane Moore tried to kill the president in 1975,” the Post reported.

Woman Who Tried Shooting Pres. Ford — Squeaky Fromme — Will Get Paroled

Few have forgotten her attempt on President Ford’s life 34 years ago. And few have forgotten that name “Squeaky”. Maybe she’ll get a new nickname once she’s on the outside.

Pres. Ford
Pres. Ford

Demian Bulwa and John Koopman
San Francisco Chronicle

Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, the waif-like Charles Manson follower who tried to shoot President Gerald Ford outside the Capitol in Sacramento in 1975, will be released from prison as early as Aug. 14, authorities said Wednesday.
Images

Fromme, now 60, has been serving a life sentence in Texas. A federal parole board granted her parole last year, but her release was delayed because she got extra time after trying to escape from a West Virginia facility in 1987.

Traci Billingsley, spokeswoman for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, said Fromme remains at a prison for women with special medical or mental health needs in Fort Worth, Texas. Billingsley said her agency had the authority to release Fromme Aug. 14, 15 or 16. She said she did not have any information about Fromme’s plans.

For Full Story

A 1987 Interview With Squeaky Fromme