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Tag: President Reagan

Secret Service Agent Credited with Saving President Reagan’s Life Died

President Reagan assassination attempt, via Wikipedia.

President Reagan assassination attempt, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jerry Parr, the Secret Service agent who helped save President Ronal Reagan from a 1981 assassination attempt, has died at a hospice in Washington, the Los Angeles Times reports. 

He died Friday of congestive heart failure at the age of 85.

Parr shoved the president into a limousine after John Hinckley Jr. unloaded five shots – one of which struck Reagan – outside the Washington Hilton.

“Jerry Parr was one of my true heroes,” Nancy Reagan said in a statement Friday. “Without Jerry looking out for Ronnie on March 30, 1981, I would have certainly lost my best friend and roommate to an assassin’s bullet.”

Parr was born in Montgomery, Ala., in September 1930 and was thrust into the spotlight after being credited with saving the president’s life.

Justice Department Official Who Resigned in Protest in ’80s Dies at 83

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Arnold I. Burns was a top Justice Department official in the 1980s when he and others resigned in protest of Attorney General Edwin Meese III’s handling of Iran contra and a number of other issues.

Burns died of cardiac arrest and complications from Parkinson’s disease, the New York Times reports. He was 83.

Burns rose rapidly through the ranks of the Justice Department under President Reagan.

But he and others resigned after allegations also surfaced that Meese was under investigation for project spending that benefited a friend and families, The Times wrote.

Under Meese, Burns said, the Justice Department had become “a world of Alice in Wonderland – a world of illusion and allusion: a world in which up was down and down was up, in was out, out was in, happy was sad and sad was happy.”

Yankee Boss Steinbrenner Cooperated With FBI to Get a Presidential Pardon

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The sometimes cantankerous and bigger than life N.Y. Yankee owner George Steinbrenner cooperated with the FBI on national security cases and other matters in the 1970s and 1980s, which helped him land a pardon from President Reagan in 1989, the New York Times reported.

His pardon was for a conviction for illegal contributions to President Nixon’s presidential election campaign. He was initially denied a pardon in 1979, the Times reported.

The Times reported that “it is not surprising that Steinbrenner helped the F.B.I., to help his case for a pardon but perhaps also to demonstrate his avowed patriotism. But clearly, he wanted a pardon.” He was fined $15,000 for his conviction, but served no time.

Steinbrenner died in July 2010.

The Times reported that in his “first pardon application in 1979, Steinbrenner wrote that his conviction prevented him from voting, affected his business, led to his suspension from baseball, and limited his participation in civic and charitable activities where his ‘status as a felon’ could embarrass those groups.”

Besides helping with national security matters, he once showed his willingness to let authorities use Yankee Stadium as a roundup point for arrests in a crackdown on organized crime gambling, the Times reported. But cold weather prompted a change in venue.

To read more click here.

Washington Post Reporter Writes Book on Shooting of Pres. Reagan

By JANET MASLIN
New York Times

The patient was 70, fit and very polite. He made it a point of pride to walk into the emergency room under his own steam. The medical staff went to work on him immediately, cutting off clothes, inserting IV lines, starting fluids and hooking up monitors. The process moved so fast that one worker never bothered to look at his face. Another asked for an address and was surprised by the answer: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

It has been nearly 30 years since President Ronald Reagan was shot outside the Washington Hilton Hotel on March 30, 1981. The attack is well remembered, but the details are not. One reason for the memory lapse, according to Del Quentin Wilber, the author of “Rawhide Down,” a newly revealing account of this potentially deadly attack, is that Reagan survived it so smoothly.

Twelve days after being fired upon, he was back at the White House looking sensational. He ultimately enhanced his popularity by rebounding with such courage, resilience and even good cheer.

Mr. Wilber, a Washington Post reporter covering law-enforcement and security issues, had no great interest in dredging up the details of this crisis. But in 2008 he covered a hearing for John W. Hinckley Jr., the blank-faced shooter who had been found not guilty by reason of insanity in 1982. (Mr. Hinckley remains largely confined to a psychiatric hospital.)

To read more click here.

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Infamous John Hinckley Has More Freedom But Secret Service Still Has Interest

John Hinckley, who shot President Reagan in 1981,  is a still a household name after all these years. He’s got more freedom these days. But when he leaves St. Elizabeths Hospital in D.C., he carries a GPS-enabled cellphone so hospital officials and the Secret Service can keep tabs on his whereabouts, the Washington Post reports.

John Hinckley Jr. -abc news photo

John Hinckley Jr. -abc news photo

By Annys Shin
Washington Post

WASHINGTON — John W. Hinckley Jr. is a man of routine. On warm days, he likes to sit on a bench outside the John Howard Pavilion on the grounds of St. Elizabeths Hospital and work his way through a stack of newspapers and magazines. He’s often seen walking alone on the hospital grounds or ducking into Martin’s, a nearby carryout, to pick up four-packs of 9 Lives to feed to stray cats.

At 54, the onetime presidential assailant lives like a kid on perpetual spring break. The closest thing he has to a 9-to-5 job is a volunteer gig at the hospital library. He fills his free time strumming on his guitar, crafting pop songs about ideal love, or going on supervised jaunts to the beach or a bowling alley.

After 28 years at the hospital in Southeast Washington, however, the realities of middle age have begun to set in.

His father, Jack Hinckley, died in 2008, inspiring the son to pen a tribute song titled “Hero.” His mother, Jo Ann, is 84. His siblings, Scott and Diane, live in Dallas. Over the government’s steadfast objections, U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman, who oversees his case, and Hinckley’s doctors are slowly preparing him for what they see as inevitable: his release from St. Elizabeths — life on his own.

To read full story click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST