Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

December 2019
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Robert Mueller III

Ex-FBI Director Mueller III Joins Law Firm as Partner After Many Years of Public Service

Robert Mueller

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III is joining the private sector.

The New York Times reports that Mueller, who served as director for 12 years before stepping down in September, is becoming a partner of the law firm WilmerHale.

“Bob brings to the firm his broad range of experience as a career prosecutor, an ability to lead the most sensitive investigations, his steady hand in a crisis and unquestioned integrity,” Robert Novick, co-managing partner of WilmerHale, said in a statement.

Mueller brings quite the background, which includes a Princeton degree, a Bronze Star for his service in Vietnam and years as the U.S. attorney in both San Francisco and Boston.

FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List Really Just Eight Most Wanted for Now

Whitey Bulger

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s legendary Ten Most Wanted list is really only the Eight Most Wanted list these days.

Two of the the most well-known figures on the list — Osama bin Laden and Boston mobster James “Whitey” Bulger — are no longer wanted. Bin Laden was killed by the U.S. military in Pakistan in May and Bulger was captured by the FBI in California in June. No one has replaced them.

Their pictures remain on the list on the FBI webpage. But the word “Captured” has been added to Bulger’s photo and “Deceased” has been added to bin Laden’s.

The FBI told ticklethewire.com on  Friday that there’s “no time frame” for when the two vacancies will be filled. The process of filling the spots is a detailed one that includes FBI field offices around the country submitting recommendations that are then reviewed at headquarters and ultimately approved by FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III.

So in the meantime, it remains the FBI’s Eight Most Wanted list.

The list currently includes less well-known names like Jason Derek Brown, Robert William Fisher and Eduardo Ravelo.

Eduardo Ravelo appears to be one of the more notable fugitives.

The FBI said he is a Captain (Capo) within the Barrio Azteca organization and issues orders to the Barrio Azteca members residing in Juarez, Mexico. He also has ties to El Paso, Tex.

Eduardo Ravelo/fbi photo

Authorities alleged that Ravelo and the Barrio Azteca members act as “hitmen” for the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes Drug Trafficking Organization and are responsible for numerous murders. The FBI said he may have had plastic surgery and altered his fingerprints.

Fisher is wanted on charges of killing his wife and two young children and then blowing up the house in which they all lived in Scottsdale, Az. in April of 2001.

Brown is wanted for murder and armed robbery in Phoenix, Arizona.  Authorities say Brown allegedly shot and killed an armored car guard outside a movie theater in November of 2004 and then fled with the money.

 

FBI Mueller’s Full Statement Before Judiciary: “FBI Has Never Faced a More Complex Threat Environment”

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III began the process on Wednesday of getting a two- year extension when he appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The Committee is considering a bill that would extend his stay two years beyond the 10-year term, which expires in September.

Currently legislation limits the term of an FBI director to 10 years, a move that was taken after J. Edgar Hoover died. Many thought Hoover had stayed on too long and gathered too much political power.

The following is Mueller’s statement before the Judiciary Committee:

Good morning Chairman Leahy, Ranking Member Grassley, and members of the committee. Thank you for the opportunity to appear before the committee today.

As you know, my term as FBI Director is due to expire later this summer. In early May, the president asked if I would be willing to serve an additional two years, and I told him I would be honored to do so.

The president has further asked that Congress pass the legislation necessary to extend my term, and the committee is considering that legislation at today’s hearing. If my term is extended, I look forward to working with the committee and the men and women of the FBI to meet the challenges that face us in the years to come.

The FBI has never faced a more complex threat environment than it does today. Over the past year, we have seen an extraordinary array of national security and criminal threats, from terrorism and espionage to cyber attacks and traditional crimes. These threats have ranged from attempts by Al Qaeda and its affiliates to place bombs on airplanes bound for the United States to lone actors seeking to detonate IEDs in public squares and subways, intent on mass murder.

Read more »

Some FBI Agents See Hypocrisy in FBI Dir. Mueller’s 2-Year Extension

Robert Mueller III/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

When President Obama announced plans to have FBI Dir. Robert S. Mueller III stay on two years beyond his 10-year term, the FBI Agents Association quickly issued a very positive statement even though some of its members were not very happy.

Nonetheless, some of the unhappiness seems to be coming out.

The Washington Post reports some agents are angry that Mueller, who imposed term limits on hundreds of supervisors, is getting an extension himself. They find some hypocrisy in the whole matter, the Post reported.

President Obama has said that he wants Mueller to stay on past his 10-year term, which expires in September, to provide some stability and continuity. Congress will have to pass some type of legislation to keep Mueller on because the law states the FBI director should serve no more than 10 years.

“We understand the desire for stability,’’ Konrad Motyka, president of the FBI Agents Association told the Post. “But people are saying, ‘What about my stability?’ It’s ironic that this desire for stability did not apply to supervisors within the FBI.’’

Konrad Motyka/ticklethewire.com photo

The policy that has so irritated agents surfaced after Sept. 11, 2001. It requires FBI supervisors to move on after seven years and compete for another managerial post, retire or get demoted at the same field office with a pay decrease, the Post reported.

The FBI has defended the policy, saying it has resulted in strong managers being brought in to various posts, the paper reported.

“People are up in arms about this,’’ one agent, who likened the news to “a shot in the kneecaps,” told the Post.

“We have lost valuable experience,’’ the agent said. “I’ve seen people, some really significant contributors to this organization and to this country, who are questioning their self-worth now and who are basically bitter.’’

The Post reported that Mueller did not seek the 2-year extension, but agreed to go along with it.

Though Mueller has enforced the term limits on supervisors, he has also given extensions to a number of agents who have reached the mandatory retirement age of 57.

The announcement of the proposed two-year extension for Mueller, has been met with mixed reaction within the bureau, ranging from ecstatic to mad to mixed.

Some say he’s been a great leader.  But others want him to go.  They say he’s drifted too far from the core mission of the agency and doesn’t relate to, or truly understand the mindset of the street agents.

Mueller, 66, started on the job  just days after the Sept. 11 attacks, forcing him to retool the agency to focus more on terrorism.

To read more of the Washington Post story click here.

After Hoover, No FBI Director Has Served Longer than Robert S. Mueller III

Robert Mueller

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Next to the big guy, J. Edgar Hoover, Robert S. Mueller III is the longest serving FBI director.

And with Thursday’s announcement of a proposed two-year extension — which seems all but certain Congress will OK —  he’ll add to the record. His 10-year term is set to expire in September.

Next to Mueller, William Webster served the most years with  9 from Feb. 23, 1978 to May 25, 1987; Louis Freeh served nearly 8 years from Sept. 1, 1993 to June 25, 2001; William Sessions served nearly 6 years from Nov. 2, 1987 to July 19, 1993; and Clarence Kelley served nearly 5 from July 9, 1973 to Feb. 15, 1978.

William Webster/fbi photo

Hoover served nearly 37 years from July 1, 1935 to May 2, 1972.

There were also acting directors who served far shorter times.

After Hoover, Congress passed a law capping the FBI director’s term at 10-years. Congress will now have to change the overall legislation or pass some narrowly worded bill so Mueller can stay on for two more years. Mueller is generally well regarded on Capitol Hill, so it appears it won’t be a big problem passing some form of legislation.

That being said, some like Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Ia.) indicated Thursday that they will give the matter some examination.

“This is an unusual step by the President, and is somewhat of a risky precedent to set,” Grassley said in a statement.

“Thirty-five years ago Congress limited the FBI director’s term to one, 10-year appointment as an important safeguard against improper political influence and abuses of the past. There’s no question that Director Mueller has proven his ability to run the FBI. And, we live in extraordinary times.

“So, I’m open to the President’s idea, but I will need to know more about his plan to ensure that this is not a more permanent extension that would undermine the purposes of the term limit.”

Clarence Kelley

William Sessions/fbi photo

Louis Freeh

IG Says FBI Misled Public and Congress About Surveilling Anti-War Rally in 2002

Robert Mueller III / file fbi photo

Robert Mueller III / file fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The FBI including the director gave inaccurate and misleading statements to Congress and the public about reasons why an agent conducted surveillance at an anti-war rally in 2002 at the Thomas Merton Center in Pittsburgh, according a report by the Justice Department’s Inspector General.

The report concluded that the FBI had no legitimate basis to believe that someone in a terrorism investigation would be present at the rally, contrary to what the FBI said in statements and the testimony Director Robert S. Mueller III delivered before Congress.

“We do not believe that the Director intentionally misled Congress,” the report concluded. “We found no evidence that he received information that should have given him reason to doubt the accuracy of the briefing material he relied on in preparing to testify.”

“Yet, it is clear that FBI personnel took insufficient care to ensure that Director Mueller was given accurate information. In this case, the Director was poorly served by those responsible for the contents of routing slip and press response.”

The FBI on Monday referred to a Sept. 14 letter written by FBI Deputy Director Timothy P. Murphy included in the report, which said: “The FBI regrets that incorrect information was provided regarding this matter.”

But it also applauded the findings of the overall report, which focused  on the FBI’s investigations on certain domestic advocacy groups.

“We are pleased the Report concludes the FBI did not target any groups for investigations on the basis of their First Amendment activities,” the letter said. ” As noted in your Report, (t)he FBI’s investigations of these individuals were generally predicated on concerns about potential criminal acts by these individuals, not their First Amendment rights.”

To read report click here.

Read Washington Post story

Number 2 Guy at FBI Ultimate Insider

Timothy Murphy/fbi photo

Timothy Murphy/fbi photo

By Jerry Markon
Washington Post Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — In the federal government, there are inside people and outside people, those who work in the bowels of the bureaucracy and others who seek out the media glare.

Timothy P. Murphy is an inside guy.

The FBI’s new deputy director speaks in the language of corporate governance and tries to run the bureau like a business. He posts “strategy maps” on his wall. Asked if he wants to replace longtime FBI director Robert S. Mueller III when Mueller’s 10-year term expires in 2011, Murphy laughs.

“I’m more of a behind-the-scenes, fix-the-problems type of guy,” says Murphy, 48, who took over the FBI’s second-ranking job in July. “I’m humbled by the director asking me to do this job, but . . . in my opinion, I’m a good number two.”

To read more click here.

Angry FBI Director Mueller Calls Release of Lockerbie Bomber a “Mockery”

Robert Mueller III/file photo

Robert Mueller III/file photo

It really is a disgrace that the man was released so early. Sick or or not sick, the man doesn’t deserve much compassion. Then again, clearly he was not the only one responsible for the death of 270 people.

By CNN
WASHINGTON — FBI Director Robert Mueller harshly criticized the decision to release the Lockerbie bomber in a letter released Saturday, calling it “a mockery of the rule of law.”

Mueller, in a note to Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill, said MacAskill’s decision to release Abdelbeset Ali Mohmed al Megrahi is “as inexplicable as it is detrimental to the cause of justice.”

Al Megrahi had been serving a life sentence for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in which 270 people, including 189 Americans, were killed.

For Full Story

Read Mueller’s Note