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Tag: Secret Service

Secret Service Agent Dies After Kayak Capsized in Maryland River

Secret Service Special Agent Stephanie Hancock, via Facebook.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Secret Service agent has died after her kayak capsized in a Maryland river.

Special Agent Stephanie Hancock, who had served on the Presidential Protective Detail, was kayaking with her boyfriend on the Severn River on Saturday, WJZ-TV reports.

After the boat overturned, her boyfriend tried to rescue her but to no avail. Rescue teams pulled him out of the water.

Hancock’s body was recovered about six hours after she slipped into the water and disappeared.

“On Saturday, June 29, 2019, the Secret Service lost one of our own in a tragic kayaking accident in Maryland. Special Agent Stephanie Hancock had been with the U.S. Secret Service since 2007, last serving on the Presidential Protective Detail,” USSS said in a statement. “Our condolences, as well as our thoughts and prayers, are with the family of Special Agent Hancock.”

It wasn’t immediately clear what caused the kayak to capsize, but authorities said Hancock was not wearing a life jacket.

Trump Profits from Secret Service Agents Who Protect Him

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump is profiting from the Secret Service agents who protect him.

In his first year as president, the Secret Service was charged more than $200,000 for using the Trump International Hotel, which is just five blocks from the White House, according to documents obtained by NBC.

One of the bills exceeded $30,000 for just two days of use by the Secret Service.

The Secret Service declined to discuss the bills.

Some critics have claimed Trump has violated the Constitution’s emoluments clause, which makes it illegal for federal officials to accept benefits from foreign or state governments without congressional approval.

Trump’s financial disclosure forms show his hotel generated more than $40.8 million in revenue in 2018, compared to $40.4 million in 2017.

Secret Service Detained Cocktail Employee Accused of Spitting on Eric Trump

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Secret Service briefly detained a Chicago cocktail bar employee accused of spitting on the face of President Trump’s son, Eric Trump, on Tuesday evening.

Trump’s middle son told the far-right publication Breitbart News that a female employee at The Aviary spat on him because “we’re winning.”

“It was purely a disgusting act by somebody who clearly has emotional problems,” Trump, executive vice president of his family’s real estate firm, The Trump Organization, told Breitbart.

The 35-year-old who often echos his dad’s rhetoric then blamed the Democratic Party.

“For a party that preaches tolerance, this once again demonstrates they have very little civility. When somebody is sick enough to resort to spitting on someone, it just emphasizes a sickness and desperation and the fact that we’re winning.”

The Secret Service declined to comment to news agencies Tuesday night.

Bretibart reported that the Secret Service questioned the employee before releasing her because Eric Trump had declined to press charges.

Black Secret Service Agent Claims He Was Detained, Held at Gunpoint Because of His Race

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

A now-retired Secret Service agent can proceed with his lawsuit claiming two U.S. Park Police officers arrested and held him at gunpoint because he is black, a federal judge ruled.

Nathaniel Hicks alleges in the suit that he was in his Secret Service-issued vehicle on the shoulder of a Maryland highway waiting to join Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson’s motorcade when he was arrested by the Park Police officers in July 2015.

According to the suit, Park Police Officer Gerald L. Ferreyra approached Hicks’ vehicle, “drew his gun, pointed the weapons at Special Agent Hicks, and began screaming at him.”

Hicks said he explained what he was doing and showed his credentials to Ferreyra, who kept his gun pointed at the agent, whose car had a police antenna and a flashing bar.

The lawsuit alleges Ferreyra called for backup anyway, and Park Police Officer Brian Philips arrived. For more than an hour, according to the suit, the officers detained Hicks, and Ferreyra yelled and “spoke to him in a degrading manner.”

Meanwhile the motorcade passed, and one of the officers “mockingly waved his hand goodbye at the motorcade as it passed.”

After a supervisor arrived, Hicks was finally released but he was not able to reach the motorcade. According to the suit, Phillips then pulled over Hicks again and demanded his identification and car registration “despite just having had possession of these documents, and continued to talk to him in a demeaning and degrading tone with no possible justification.”

Hicks was eventually let go.

The officers, who dispute Hicks’ versions of events, asked a judge to dismiss the case against them, arguing immunity because they acted in a reasonably lawful way and did not violate Hicks’ rights.

Hicks’ attorneys disagree, saying the officers had “discriminatory motives,” partly based on their hostility toward Hicks.

“Based on upon the absence of probable cause, or even any reasonable suspicion to justify his prolonged seizure, it appears that Special Agent Hicks was singled out for unlawful treatment because of his race,” the complaint alleges.

In his deposition, Hicks described a tense encounter.

“When there is a gun pointed at you, regardless of what time it is, whether it’s night or day, you’re not going to forget that,” Hicks said. “In all my years of my position as a law enforcement officer, I never had that happen before.”

U.S. District Judge Paul Grimm declined to dismiss the suit this week, saying the officers did not have a good argument for failing to release Hicks before the motorcade arrived, NBC News reports.

“It is clearly established that detaining a person under these circumstances — when the officers had a reasonable suspicion that criminal activity was underway but, after some investigation, became aware that no criminal activity was happening at the scene — is a violation of the individual’s Fourth Amendment rights,” Grimm wrote.

Hicks, who retired shortly after filing the suit, is suing for compensatory and punitive damages, saying he suffered “significant embarrassment, humiliation, emotional distress, and the deprivation of his constitutional rights.”

“In addition to the manner in which defendants spoke to and treated him, it was particularly humiliating to be held on the side of the road as his colleagues passed by. That he was subjected to unlawful treatment because of his race compounds his emotional distress,” Hicks’ lawsuit said.

Paralyzed Secret Service Agent to Join Boston Marathon to Give Back

Garrett FitzGerald and his wife Joan.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Secret Service agent who was paralyzed in a car crash while on duty in New Hampshire in 2015 will join the throngs of runners in the Boston Marathon on Monday.

Agent Garrett FitzGerald will be joined by his supervisor, Don McGrail, who is the assistant to the special agent in charge.

“We were struck head-on by a driver driving the opposite direction who was high on heroin,” FitzGerald told WMUR.com.

FitzGerald and McGail are running under the name, Team Fritz, in hopes of raising $20,000 for Journey Forward, where Fitzgerald spend four days a week for nearly three years in rehabilitation.

As of Monday morning, they have raised $11,662.

“What they do here is nothing short of a miracle,” FitzGerald said.

“Team Fitz is more than just a running club,” McGrail said. “We are there to support the Fitzgerald family, whether that’s a meal train or helping them move in and out of a home — whatever it is. There is a whole group of people there to support the family.”

FitzGerald never gave up, and seven months ago he became a father.

“It’s been wonderful being a dad,” he said. “It’s different. Certainly, nothing can prepare you for that change or the sleepless nights, but it’s good.”

Secret Service Agent Who Said She Wouldn’t Take A Bullet For Trump is Leaving

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Kerry O’Grady, the U.S. Secret Service agent who publicly said in 2017 that she wouldn’t take a bullet President Donald Trump, is leaving the agencies with a black mark. Still, she’ll walk away in about three weeks with her pension intact, Real Clear Politics reports.

After he comment went public, she was removed as head of the Denver office.

Real Clear Politics reports that she has quietly settled a disciplinary action against her.

Secret Service Officer Injured After Protester Jumped in Front of Motorcade near White House

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

A uniformed Secret Service officer was injured after a protester jumped in front of a motorcade carrying Chinese officials near the White House on Wednesday.

An unidentified pedestrian was arrested for crossing a police line and then assaulting the officer just blocks from the White House at 12:55 p.m., NBC reports. 

The officer was taken to the hospital with a leg injury that officials described as serious but not life-threatening.

Details of the incident remained murky Thursday morning.

Secret Service Agents Who Sacrifice Their Lives to Protect the President Are Working without Pay

Photo via Secret Service.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

The men and women who have sworn to sacrifice their own lives to protect the president are not receiving paychecks under the government shutdown.

The 7,000 Secret Service employees, including those on protective details and uniformed officers, missed their first paycheck of the new year.

“These are the people who are closest to him and clearly put their lives on the line for him every single day,” Rick Tyler, a Republican political consultant, told Huffington Post. “He has demonstrated no empathy for them over this situation.” 

Trump has been virtually mum on the tens of thousands of federal law enforcement officials who have been forced to work without pay. They include TSA screeners and FBI, DEA, ATF and Border Patrol agents who are considered “essential” employees.

Thousands of TSA screeners have been calling in sick in protest, causing snarls and security concerns at airports.

The irony is that the shutdown over border protection could make the country more unsafe.