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Tag: women

Marijuana Use and Disorders Double

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

Marijuana use has doubled in the last decade, and with that has come a doubling in the use disorders associated with it, according to a recent medical study by a Columbia University epidemiologist published this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry and in Medscape Medical News.

Dr. Deborah Hasin reported that the attitude of increasing numbers of the population is that the drug is a harmless natural substance. Because of that shift in perception, the prevalence rates of use have increased from 4.1% in 2001 to 9.5% in 2014. This increase was greatest among women (2.6% to 6.9%), African Americans (4.7% to 12.7%), Hispanic Americans (3.3% to 8.4%), and older people (.04% to 1.3%). Lower income groups showed the greatest increase.

The study’s findings were based on two nationally representative, face-to-face interview surveys of US adults aged 18 years and older: the 2001 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, and the 2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

marijuana-istock

The prevalence rates of marijuana use disorders among the general population nearly doubled from 1.5% to 2.9%. Among marijuana users, however, that figure declined from 35.6% to 30.6%. The difference lies in the increased number of users in the general population as more states legalize its use in one way or another and more people consider its use as having no risks. Currently 23 states authorize use for medical purposes and 4 for recreational use.

If the number of states legalizing use continues to rise, the authors of the study advise that we should be prepared for greater numbers of addiction, vehicle crashes, emergency room visits, psychiatric symptoms, poor quality of life, cognitive decline, and use of other drugs, according to other published medical studies.

First Female FBI Agent Killed in Line of Duty 30 Years Ago This Month

Robin Ahrens

Robin Ahrens

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Thirty years ago this month, the first female FBI agent was killed in the line of duty.

Robin Ahrens had only been a special agent for six months when she died following a shootout on Oct. 5, 1985, the Hudson Star-Observer reports. 

She was just 33 years old.

Ahrens was staking out a Phoenix apartment complex when she was shot by two other agents who falsely believed she was the girlfriend of an armed robbery suspect.

Hundreds of people, including FBI Director William Webster, attended the funeral.

Other Stories of Interest

Border Patrol Falls Far Short of Goal of Hiring 1,600 Women As Agents

border patrol 3By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Border Patrol went on a hiring spree for more female agents but came far short of its goal of hiring up to 1,600 women.

The agency wanted to hire more women because of the tens of thousands of parents and children who crossed the border last year.

By last week’s deadline, the Washington Post reports that only 50 women have been selected.

We are really looking to ramp up,” said Stacy King, Supervisory Human Resources Specialist for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency, “but recruitment, hiring and retention of female law enforcement officers continues to be a challenge for us.”

It’s not easy work, said Adriana Palacios, 36, an operations officer and recruiter for the Border Patrol station in Texas.

“You work by yourself,” Palacios said. “You could be alone in the dark and your partner is a mile down the river.”

Hiring More Women As Border Patrol Agents Is About More Than Equality

border patrol 3By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Border Patrol’s unprecedented campaign to hire more women is not just about equality.

It’s also practical, the Los Angeles Times reports. 

Many of the 1,600 agents that the Border Patrol plans to hire by the end of the fiscal year Sept. 30 will be women. Only 5% of the agency’s 21,000 agents are women.

The advantages to having female agents are numerous, proponents of the plan said. For one, female agents generally have better relationships migrants who are sexually assaulted. They also can search for valuables hidden in bras and can gather information from migrants by being talkative.

“The women will tell them a lot through girl talk,” said Monique Grame, 39, a single mother from San Diego who joined the Border Patrol nearly 15 years ago.

“The perception is we’re more natural, we put people at ease.”

One of Secret Service’s First Female Agents to Protect President Writes Book

behind-the-shades-book-e1429300770480By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A former Secret Service agent has published a book about her experience as one of the first women on the presidential protection force, The Hill reports.

Sue Ann Baker’s memoir, “Behind the Shades,” details becoming one of the first five female agents in 1971 – long after the Secret Service was launched more than a century ago.

“I was the first ‘girl agent,’ as they called us back then,” Baker told the Hill.

Seeing female agents wasn’t easy for a lot of them men, Baker said.

“There were a lot of guys that clearly didn’t want us there.”

The Secret Service also didn’t make it easy, she said

“When we first were brought into the White House police, the Executive Protective Service, first of all, they never thought to issue us uniforms,” Baker, 69, said. “So we really couldn’t do what the men did, you know, standing in the guard shacks around the White House, because no one would have ever acknowledged any of our authority because we’re standing there in skirts of varying lengths. No pants then.”

Other Stories of Interest

Weekend Series on Crime History: Dangerous Women in the Criminal World

FBI’s New Special Agent in Charge of Cincinnati Office is Angela Byers

Angela Byers

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The new head of the FBI’s Cincinnati Field Office has a rare opportunity.

Angela Byers, who recently became the new agent in charge of the office, joined the bureau in 1986, just 14 years after the bureau began to allow women to become agents.

When J. Edgar Hoover was the director, he asked the bureau’s first female special agent to resign.

“I would think there were men who wanted this job,” Byers told WKRC Cincinnati. “Yes, there were and I’m sure a lot of men who haven’t worked for a woman in charge may be unsure what that means.”

Byers is the second woman to lead the Cincinnati office.

Byers said she likes her location.

“I lived in Washington D.C. everyone was so transient and I didn’t get warmth from the people like I do here,” said Byers.

Border Patrol’s Recruitment of Women Gets 5,500 Female Applicants for Jobs

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A recruitment effort to hire more women into Border Patrol is paying off as CBP announced recently that it received applications from 5,500 female applicants, Federal News Radio 1500 AM.

The agency’s ranks of 21,000 agents only include about 5% women.

CBP wants more female agents, partly because more women are crossing the border.

“As a police chief for a long time, I know that women in law enforcement bring a huge amount of positive to any law enforcement agency, and increasing those numbers for the border patrol will do exactly the same thing,” CBP Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske said.

“The real goal, of course, is that we needed to increase the numbers at all the levels, all the ranks, and throughout the border patrol of women, because of all of the skills that they bring to the job,” he said.